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The Navy’s Blue Angels take part in an air show in Lincoln, Nebraska.

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The Navy’s Blue Angels take part in an air show in Lincoln, Nebraska.

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The Navy’s Blue Angels take part in an air show in Lincoln, Nebraska.

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The Navy’s Blue Angels take part in an air show in Lincoln, Nebraska.

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The Navy’s Blue Angels take part in an air show in Lincoln, Nebraska.

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The Navy’s Blue Angels take part in an air show in Lincoln, Nebraska.

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The Navy’s Blue Angels take part in an air show in Lincoln, Nebraska.

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The Navy’s Blue Angels take part in an air show in Lincoln, Nebraska.

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The Navy’s Blue Angels take part in an air show in Lincoln, Nebraska.

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The living room of a native American family in the Pacific Northwest shows images of past and present realities of this salmon-centered culture.

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These are steelhead salmon smolts (Oncorhynchus mykiss) being raised at a hatchery. They will soon be transported to release streams in the hope that some of them will survive their migration to the sea; but the heavily dammed Columbia river and its tributaries have become an obstacle course for several imperiled species. In addition the Native Americans, to whom the salmon runs are crucial, find fishing very poor. (US: Threatened)

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Unplanned product of a foster-parent program for endangered whooping cranes (Grus americana), a “whoopill” was sired out of a whooper out of a great Sandhill crane (Grus canadensis canadensis). Having failed to produce a single breeding female, biologists have abandoned their efforts to create a viable flock of whooping cranes, whose numbers in the wild have crept from 51 in 1973 to about 165 today. Many think that, rather than struggling to restore a creature so near extinction, efforts should be concentrated on species in the early stages of danger.

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South of Los Angeles the implacable sprawl of single-family homes like these has reached critical mass. Or so think local environmentalists, who are challenging new developments to safeguard dwindling parcels of coastal sage scrub, habitat of the California gnatcatcher. Increasingly, developers compromise by setting aside land for imperiled species.

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Hit-and-run victims on Florida’s busy waterways, injured manatees maintain vital buoyancy only with the aid of inflatable wet suits at Orlando’s Sea World.

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A prodigy of adaptation, the endangered least tern (Sterna albifrons) survived the test of evolution by nesting on barren sandbars, protected from predators by the swift flow of surrounding rivers. These moated habitats are created by naturally occurring spring floods, which humans now spend millions to prevent.

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This tiny snail darter (Percina tanasi) stalled the construction of Tellico dam on the Little Tennessee river. Though the dam was built, the Endangered Species Act was henceforth seen in many quarters as an enemy of progress.

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This bird earned questionable notoriety as a job buster. It is the northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis occidentalis), listed as threatened in 1990; it w as expected to cause thousands of job losses by disrupting logging in the forests of the Pacific Northwest. The actual cost of protection to the regional economy is not yet known.

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Fragmentation of fragile habitat has added to the woes of the once-hardy desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizi). They are collected from soon-to-be-developed lands and sent to a center where they are adopted, euthanized (if ill), or used for research.

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An eastern hognose snake (Heterodon platirhinos) plays dead on the Snake Road, a three-mile stretch of road in the Shawnee National Forest in southern Illinois. To prevent herp deaths, this section of road is closed in the spring and fall when snakes are migrating.

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An eastern hognose snake plays dead on the Snake Road, a three-mile stretch of road in the Shawnee National Forest in southern Illinois. To prevent herp deaths, this section of road is closed in the spring and fall when snakes are migrating.

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A snorkeler reaches out to a vulnerable (IUCN) and federally endangered manatee (Trichechus manatus) in Florida.

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Red wolf in a captive breeding program at the Tacoma Park Zoo in Washington state.

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A red wolf pup is netted for easy handling at the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge.

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Native American dip-netting for salmon on the Klickitat River (a tributary of the Columbia) in Washington.

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The endangered El Segundo blue butterfly clings to survival at the foot of a runway at LAX.

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An endangered American burying beetle crawls over a dead mourning dove. (Hwy 47, near Gothenburg, NE.)

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A juvenile whooping crane, (Grus americana), endangered; dead of avian cholera at Bosque del Apache NWR in New Mexico.

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Bald Eagles pick fish out of the shallows at the McNary Damnear Ogallala, NE, on the Platte River.

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Endangered freshwater mussels in the hands of biologists onthe Clinch River in Kentucky. Mussels are the most endangered fauna species, with 50% of them now either threatened, endangered, or extinct.

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The endangered black-footed ferret was saved from extinction through captive breeding programs.

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A diver with the endangered Florida manatee near Crystal River, Florida.

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Biologists study the injuries of a manatee who was killed by a speedboat’s propellers.

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California gray whales (protected) at Laguna San Ignacio near Baja, Mexico.

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The San Diego coast horned lizard (Phrynosoma coronatum), not yet listed, but a species of special concern, in El Segundo, California.

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Biologists hold out their arms so that they look bigger, inorder to discourage a large male Steller sea lion from charging them. (Near Ketchikan, AK.)

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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