Photo

ANI106-00205

An adult female Common Marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) named Liilu and her three-month old baby named Marshmallow at the University of Nebraska, Omaha.

Photo

ANI106-00204

An adult female Common Marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) named Liilu and her three-month old baby named Marshmallow at the University of Nebraska, Omaha.

Photo

ANI106-00203

An adult female Common Marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) named Liilu at the University of Nebraska, Omaha.

Photo

ANI106-00202

An adult female Common Marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) named Liilu at the University of Nebraska, Omaha.

Photo

ANI106-00201

An adult female Common Marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) named Liilu and her three-month old baby named Marshmallow at the University of Nebraska, Omaha.

Photo

ANI106-00200

An adult female Common Marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) named Liilu and her three-month old baby named Marshmallow at the University of Nebraska, Omaha.

Photo

ANI008-00037

A Steller sea lion cow (Eumetopias jubatus) exchanges a “kiss” with her pup. Lowrie is a small island on the north end of Forrester National Wildlife Refuge; it serves as the rookery of the world’s largest concentration of these mammals. About 5,000 gather here at the height of the breeding/pupping season in late June and early July. Biologists puzzle over the fact that the species is faring so badly in relatively wild Alaska. Slow starvation may be the answer, since its principal food, pollock, has become increasingly popular with human competitors.

Photo

SCE049-00026

Horses are ridden through King’s Canyon National Park.

Photo

FIS014-00045

Juvenile Carolina madtoms (Noturus furiosus) at Conservation Fisheries in Knoxville, Tennessee. Collected as eggs in the Tar River drainage of North Carolina. These fish are less than one year old, and have very different markings than adult Carolina madtoms.

This species depends on mussels to survive; empty mussel shells provide them with both cover and nesting habitat. Mussels are also not doing well in these places, which hurts this fish. Factory farms and introduced flathead catfish are leading to their demise as well.

Photo

FIS014-00043

An endangered adult Carolina madtom (Noturus furiosus) at Conservation Fisheries in Knoxville, Tennessee. This fish was collected in Neuse River in North Carolina. This is one of just two fish collected in this place in the past 8 years, so biologists fear that the species may soon be extinct in this river in the near future. It persists in one other river system, the Tar River in North Carolina.

This fish depends on mussels to survive; empty mussel shells provide them with both cover and nesting habitat. Mussels are also not doing well in these places, which hurts this fish. Factory farms and introduced flathead catfish are leading to their demise as well.

Photo

FIS014-00042

An endangered adult Carolina madtom (Noturus furiosus) at Conservation Fisheries in Knoxville, Tennessee. This fish was collected in Neuse River in North Carolina. This is one of just two fish collected in this place in the past 8 years, so biologists fear that the species may soon be extinct in this river in the near future. It persists in one other river system, the Tar River in North Carolina.

This fish depends on mussels to survive; empty mussel shells provide them with both cover and nesting habitat. Mussels are also not doing well in these places, which hurts this fish. Factory farms and introduced flathead catfish are leading to their demise as well.

Photo

FIS014-00041

An endangered adult Carolina madtom (Noturus furiosus) at Conservation Fisheries in Knoxville, Tennessee. This fish was collected in Neuse River in North Carolina. This is one of just two fish collected in this place in the past 8 years, so biologists fear that the species may soon be extinct in this river in the near future. It persists in one other river system, the Tar River in North Carolina.

This fish depends on lots of mussels to survive; empty mussel shells provide them with both cover and nesting habitat. Mussels are also not doing well in these places, which hurts this fish. Factory farms and introduced flathead catfish are leading to their demise as well.

Photo

FIS014-00040

An endangered adult Carolina madtom (Noturus furiosus) at Conservation Fisheries in Knoxville, Tennessee. Collected in Neuse River in North Carolina. This is one of just two fish collected in this place in the past 8 years, so biologists fear that the species may soon be extinct in this river in the near future. It persists in one other river system, the Tar River in North Carolina.

This fish depends on lots of mussels to survive; empty mussel shells provide them with both cover and nesting habitat. Mussels are also not doing well in these places, which hurts this fish. Factory farms and introduced flathead catfish are leading to their demise as well.

Photo

FIS014-00039

An endangered adult Carolina madtom (Noturus furiosus) at Conservation Fisheries in Knoxville, Tennessee. Collected in Neuse River in North Carolina. This is one of just two fish collected in this place in the past 8 years, so biologists fear that the species may soon be extinct in this river in the near future. It persists in one other river system, the Tar River in North Carolina.

This fish depends on lots of mussels to survive; empty mussel shells provide them with both cover and nesting habitat. Mussels are also not doing well in these places, which hurts this fish. Factory farms and introduced flathead catfish are leading to their demise as well.

Photo

BIR076-00045

An adult gray catbird (Dumetella carolinensis carolinensis) at Rum River Central Park.

This bird was caught and banded as part of a nation-wide study of birds called MAPS (Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship) coordinated by the Institute for Bird Populations.

Photo

BIR076-00043

An adult gray catbird (Dumetella carolinensis carolinensis) at Rum River Central Park.

This bird was caught and banded as part of a nation-wide study of birds called MAPS (Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship) coordinated by the Institute for Bird Populations.

Photo

BIR049-00135

An adult female song sparrow (Melospiza melodia euphonia) at Rum River Central Park.

This bird was caught and banded as part of a nation-wide study of birds called MAPS (Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship) coordinated by the Institute for Bird Populations.

Photo

BIR049-00134

An adult female song sparrow (Melospiza melodia euphonia) at Rum River Central Park.

This bird was caught and banded as part of a nation-wide study of birds called MAPS (Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship) coordinated by the Institute for Bird Populations.

Photo

BIR049-00124

A male and female Florida grasshopper sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum floridanus) at White Oak Conservation Center, Yulee, Florida. The female has yellow, red blue split colors on her leg bands, while the male has green/blue leg bands. These adults were both hatched here last year.

These birds are part of a captive breeding program for this critically endangered bird, a few of which still live in the vanishing prairies of central Florida. There are nearly 100 adults, nestlings and hatch year birds here now at White Oak. This is likely more than are left in the wild now.

Photo

BIR049-00122

A male Florida grasshopper sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum floridanus) at White Oak Conservation Center, Yulee, Florida. This adult bird was hatched here last year.

This bird is part of a captive breeding program for this critically endangered species, a few of which still live in the vanishing prairies of central Florida. There are nearly 100 adults, nestlings and hatch year birds here now at White Oak. This is likely more than are left in the wild now.

Photo

BIR049-00121

A Florida grasshopper sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum floridanus) at White Oak Conservation Center, Yulee, Florida. This adult bird was hatched here last year.

This bird is part of a captive breeding program for this critically endangered species, a few of which still live in the vanishing prairies of central Florida. There are nearly 100 adults, nestlings and hatch year birds here now at White Oak. This is likely more than are left in the wild now.

Photo

BIR049-00120

A Florida grasshopper sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum floridanus) at White Oak Conservation Center, Yulee, Florida. This adult bird was hatched here last year.

This bird is part of a captive breeding program for this critically endangered species, a few of which still live in the vanishing prairies of central Florida. There are nearly 100 adults, nestlings and hatch year birds here now at White Oak. This is likely more than are left in the wild now.

Photo

ANI110-00196

An adult Rosenberg’s gladiator treefrog (Boana rosenberg) at Balsa de los Sapos. This species is a part of a breeding study center at the Universidad Católica del Ecuador in Quito.

This individual was from Santo Domingo de los Tsachilas.

Photo

ANI110-00195

An adult Rosenberg’s gladiator treefrog (Boana rosenberg) at Balsa de los Sapos. This species is a part of a breeding study center at the Universidad Católica del Ecuador in Quito.

This individual was from Santo Domingo de los Tsachilas.

Photo

ANI110-00194

An adult Rosenberg’s gladiator treefrog (Boana rosenberg) at Balsa de los Sapos. This species is a part of a breeding study center at the Universidad Católica del Ecuador in Quito.

This individual was from Santo Domingo de los Tsachilas.

Photo

BIR024-00258

A male, Harris’s hawk (Parabuteo unicinctus unicinctus) at Zoologico de Quito.

Photo

BIR024-00257

A male, Harris’s hawk (Parabuteo unicinctus unicinctus) at Zoologico de Quito.

Photo

BIR024-00256

A male, Harris’s hawk (Parabuteo unicinctus unicinctus) at Zoologico de Quito.

Photo

BIR024-00255

A male, Harris’s hawk (Parabuteo unicinctus unicinctus) at Zoologico de Quito.

Photo

ANI108-00068

An adult, male white-tailed titi (Callicebus discolor) at Zoologico de Quito.

Photo

ANI108-00067

An adult, male white-tailed titi (Callicebus discolor) at Zoologico de Quito.

Photo

ANI108-00066

An adult, male white-tailed titi (Callicebus discolor) at Zoologico de Quito.

Photo

ANI108-00057

A female Venezuelan red howler monkey (Alouatta seniculus juara) at Mantenedor da Fauna Silvestre Cariuá. This animal is named Ella.

Photo

ANI108-00056

A female Venezuelan red howler monkey (Alouatta seniculus juara) at Mantenedor da Fauna Silvestre Cariuá. This animal is named Ella.

Photo

ANI108-00055

A female Venezuelan red howler monkey (Alouatta seniculus juara) at Mantenedor da Fauna Silvestre Cariuá. This animal is named Ella.

Photo

INS002-00451

Adult darkling beetles (Zophobas morio) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. These animals are used for feed amphibians and other animals.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

Speaking Engagements

Joel is a popular keynote speaker with conservation, corporate, and civic groups.

Hire him to entertain and inspire your audience.

Book Joel To Speak

The Photo Ark

Joel is the founder of the Photo Ark, a groundbreaking effort to document every species in captivity before it’s too late.

Explore the Photo Ark

Visit Our Store

Every purchase goes directly to support our mission: getting the public to care and helping to save species from extinction.

Help Us Build the Ark