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An aerial of Boston, Massachusetts at night with time exposure car lights, the Custom House tower is seen.

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A person running on a roof top track at the Boston Racquet Club.

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White pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) in migration flight over a barrier island fringing a Louisiana salt marsh in the Gulf of Mexico.

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Condominiums along Sand Key along the Gulf of Mexico near Clearwater-St. Petersburg, Florida.

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A Louisiana-built oil drilling and production platform is carried by a Barge toward the Gulf of Mexico.

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A crucifix sculpture by artists of the Baptist center stands amid students and sunbathers on South Padre Island, Texas.

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Aerials of the Jonah Field in the Green River Basin, Wyoming. A once-wild area that’s now an industrial zone due to natural gas drilling. Sage grouse, mule deer and pronghorn antelope habitat has mostly been ruined here, with no end in sight as the drilling increases across the Pinedale Anticline, the large mesa that caps the gas deposits.

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Aerials of the Jonah Field in the Green River Basin, Wyoming. A once-wild area that’s now an industrial zone due to natural gas drilling. Sage grouse, mule deer and pronghorn antelope habitat has mostly been ruined here, with no end in sight as the drilling increases across the Pinedale Anticline, the large mesa that caps the gas deposits.

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A large herd of bison (Bison bison) running across the prairie on the Triple U Bison Ranch near Fort Pierre, South Dakota. This ranch has about 2,000 head of bison on over 50,000 acres.

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A large herd of bison (Bison bison) running across the prairie on the Triple U Bison Ranch near Fort Pierre, South Dakota. This ranch has about 2,000 head of bison on over 50,000 acres.

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A large herd of bison (Bison bison) running across the prairie on the Triple U Bison Ranch near Fort Pierre, South Dakota. This ranch has about 2,000 head of bison on over 50,000 acres.

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A large herd of bison (Bison bison) running across the prairie on the Triple U Bison Ranch near Fort Pierre, South Dakota. This ranch has about 2,000 head of bison on over 50,000 acres.

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A large herd of bison (Bison bison) running across the prairie on the Triple U Bison Ranch near Fort Pierre, South Dakota. This ranch has about 2,000 head of bison on over 50,000 acres.

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A large herd of bison (Bison bison) running across the prairie on the Triple U Bison Ranch near Fort Pierre, South Dakota. This ranch has about 2,000 head of bison on over 50,000 acres.

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An aerial of the Bowden natural gas drilling area along the MIlk river northeast of Malta, Montana.

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Aerial of the Bowdoin natural gas drilling area northeast of Malta, Montana.

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Aerials of the world’s largest wind farm near Abilene, TX. The farm spreads out over 47,000 acres in Nolan and Taylor Counties in Texas. There are more than 500 turbines in this development, which sprawls over farmland, pasture and mesquite and juniper scrub. Environmentalists are quite concerned that wind turbines are killing increasing numbers of migrating bats and birds.

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Aerials of the world’s largest wind farm near Abilene, TX. The farm spreads out over 47,000 acres in Nolan and Taylor Counties in Texas. There are more than 500 turbines in this development, which sprawls over farmland, pasture and mesquite and juniper scrub. Environmentalists are quite concerned that wind turbines are killing increasing numbers of migrating bats and birds.

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Aerials of the world’s largest wind farm near Abilene, TX. The farm spreads out over 47,000 acres in Nolan and Taylor Counties in Texas. There are more than 500 turbines in this development, which sprawls over farmland, pasture and mesquite and juniper scrub. Environmentalists are quite concerned that wind turbines are killing increasing numbers of migrating bats and birds.

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Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River, forming living sandbars, during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

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On board a PHI helicopter/media flight covering the deep water horizon oil spill at the spill site, two types of burning are now going on. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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On board a PHI helicopter/media flight covering the deep water horizon oil spill at the spill site, two types of burning are now going on. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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On board a PHI helicopter/media flight covering the deep water horizon oil spill at the spill site, two types of burning are now going on. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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Sand berms frame rows of beach houses on Dauphin Island, Alabama during the deep water horizon oil spill.

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Sand berms frame rows of beach houses on Dauphin Island, Alabama during the deep water horizon oil spill.

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An aerial of watercraft cutting through the surface oil near the deep water horizon spill site in the Gulf of Mexico.

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Helicopter shadow over oiled marsh near Port Sulphur, Louisiana.

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An aerial of heavily oiled marshlands surrounded by oil booms in Barataria Bay, Louisiana.

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An aerial of an watercraft cutting through the surface oil near the deep water horizon spill site in the Gulf of Mexico.

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Approximately 500 wild horses (Equus ferus) at the Triple U Bison Ranch near Fort Pierre, South Dakota.

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Approximately 500 wild horses (Equus ferus) at the Triple U Bison Ranch near Fort Pierre, South Dakota.

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Burning surface oil not far from the Deepwater Horizon spill site creates huge black columns of smoke in the Gulf of Mexico.

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Burning surface oil not far from the Deepwater Horizon spill site creates huge black columns of smoke in the Gulf of Mexico.

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Berms were built on a barrier island near Grand Isle, Louisiana, in an attempt to protect it from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

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Boats burning off surface oil not near the Deepwater Horizon spill site creating huge black columns of smoke in the Gulf of Mexico.

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This aerial shows two types of burn-offs used on the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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