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ANI071-00489

A phantasmal dart frog (Epipediobates tricolor) at the National Aquarium in Baltimore. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN.

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ANI071-00490

A blue morph of the yellow-striped poison frog (Dendrobates truncatus) from a private collection.

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ANI071-00488

A yellow-lined poison dart frog (Dendrobates truncatus) at the National Aquarium in Baltimore.

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ANI071-00491

A darkland morph of the strawberry poison dart frog (Oophaga pumilo) from a private collection.

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ANI071-00493

A tungarra frog (Engystomps pustulosus) at the captive breeding facility in Quito, Ecuador.

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ANI071-00492

A tree frog (Arthroleptis poecilonotus) from Southern Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea.

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ANI071-00459

A splash-backed poison frog (Dendrobates galactonotus), orange morph, from a private collection.

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ANI071-00450

A Gordon’s purple mossy frog (Theloderma gordoni) plays dead at Reptile Gardens.

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ANI071-00460

A splash-backed poison frog (Dendrobates galactonotus), 75% yellow morph, from a private collection.

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ANI071-00458

A red Amazonicus poison frog (Dendrobates amazonicus) from a private collection.

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ANI071-00454

An endangered blue-legged mantella (Mantella expectata) at the National Aquarium in Baltimore.

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ANI071-00453

A Malaysian gliding tree frog (Rhacophorus pardalis) from a private collection.

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ANI071-00457

An endangered golden poison frog (Phyllobates terribilis), orange morph, from a private collection. This is the most toxic species of frog. One wild frog can contain enough toxin to kill 10-15 adult humans. Captive bred specimens don’t contain any toxin due to their diet.

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ANI071-00452

A Malaysian gliding tree frog (Rhacophorus pardalis) from a private collection.

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ANI071-00455

An endangered golden poison frog (Phyllobates terribilis), orange morph, from a private collection. This is the most toxic species of frog. One wild frog can contain enough toxin to kill 10-15 adult humans. Captive bred specimens don’t contain any toxin due to their diet.

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ANI071-00456

An endangered golden poison frog (Phyllobates terribilis), orange morph, from a private collection. This is the most toxic species of frog. One wild frog can contain enough toxin to kill 10-15 adult humans. Captive bred specimens don’t contain any toxin due to their diet.

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ANI071-00448

Two Gordon’s purple mossy frogs (Theloderma gordoni) play dead at Reptile Gardens.

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ANI071-00441

A red-legged running frog (Phlyctimantis maculatus) at Safari Land Pet Center.

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ANI071-00444

A red-legged running frog (Phlyctimantis maculatus) at Safari Land Pet Center.

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ANI071-00446

A giant monkey frog (Phyllomedusa bicolor) at the Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo.

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ANI071-00443

A red-legged running frog (Phlyctimantis maculatus) at Safari Land Pet Center.

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ANI071-00447

A Gordon’s purple mossy frog (Theloderma gordoni) plays dead at Reptile Gardens.

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ANI071-00449

A Gordon’s purple mossy frog (Theloderma gordoni) at Reptile Gardens.

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ANI071-00442

A red-legged running frog (Phlyctimantis maculatus) at Safari Land Pet Center.

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ANI071-00445

A giant monkey frog (Phyllomedusa bicolor) at the Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo.

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ANI071-00468

A Pichincha robber frog (Pristimantis parvillus) from a cloud forest reserve near Mindo, Ecuador.

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ANI071-00472

An endangered Yosemite toad (Anaxyrus canorus) from San Francisco State University.

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ANI071-00469

An Ecuador cochran frog (Nymphargus griffithsi) from a cloud forest reserve near Mindo, Ecuador.

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ANI071-00475

A Pacific treefrog (Pseudacris regilla) from San Francisco State University.

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ANI071-00471

A Roque treefrog (Hyloscirctus phyllognathus) from Limon, Ecuador.

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ANI071-00464

A jade gliding frog (Rhacophorus prominanus) at the Houston Zoo.

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ANI071-00480

A red toad (Schismaderma carens) from Gorongosa National Park.

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ANI071-00465

A common tree frog (Polypedates leucomystax) at the Singapore Zoo.

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ANI071-00466

A Chiriboga robber frog (Pristimantis eremitus) from a cloud forest reserve near Mindo, Ecuador. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN.

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ANI071-00479

A Mozambique ridged frog (Ptychadena mossambica) from Gorongosa National Park.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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