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ANI110-00077

An endangered female gray-bellied marsupial frog (Gastrotheca litonedis) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Busa Lagoon, Azuay Province, Ecuador. This species is threatened by habitat loss.

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ANI110-00076

An endangered male gray-bellied marsupial frog (Gastrotheca litonedis) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Busa Lagoon, Azuay Province, Ecuador. This species is threatened by habitat loss.

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ANI110-00075

An endangered female gray-bellied marsupial frog (Gastrotheca litonedis) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Busa Lagoon, Azuay Province, Ecuador. This species is threatened by habitat loss.

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ANI110-00074

An endangered female gray-bellied marsupial frog (Gastrotheca litonedis) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Busa Lagoon, Azuay Province, Ecuador. This species is threatened by habitat loss.

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ANI110-00073

A male Lojana marsupial frog (Gastrotheca lojana) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Ona, Azuay Province, Ecuador.

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ANI110-00072

A male Lojana marsupial frog (Gastrotheca lojana) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Ona, Azuay Province, Ecuador.

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ANI110-00071

A female Lojana marsupial frog (Gastrotheca lojana) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Ona, Azuay Province, Ecuador. Females of this genus have a marsupial-style pouch in their back where their offspring grow until they born as completely formed juvenile frogs.

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ANI110-00070

A female Lojana marsupial frog (Gastrotheca lojana) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Ona, Azuay Province, Ecuador. Females of this genus have a marsupial-style pouch in their back where their offspring grow until they born as completely formed juvenile frogs.

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ANI110-00066

A Ecuadorean snub-nosed frog (Ctenophryne aequatorialis) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Cuenca, Azuay Province, Ecuador. The species is threatened by urban development, fire, destruction of habitat, intensive agriculture and livestock, pollution, and use of agrochemicals.

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ANI110-00065

A Ecuadorean snub-nosed frog (Ctenophryne aequatorialis) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Cuenca, Azuay Province, Ecuador. The species is threatened by urban development, fire, destruction of habitat, intensive agriculture and livestock, pollution, and use of agrochemicals.

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ANI110-00012

A female Epibatidin dart poison frog (Epipedobates anthonyi) Santa Marta morph, at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Santa Marta, Azuay Province, Ecuador.

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ANI110-00011

A female Epibatidin dart poison frog (Epipedobates anthonyi) Santa Marta morph, at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Santa Marta, Azuay Province, Ecuador.

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ANI110-00010

A female Epibatidin dart poison frog (Epipedobates anthonyi) Santa Marta morph, at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Santa Marta, Azuay Province, Ecuador.

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ANI110-00009

An endangered Mazán harlequin toad (Atelopus exiguus) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Parque Nacional Cajas, Azuay Province, Ecuador. The population used to be very common but now there are only six individuals known. They are breeding yet and extremely hard to find in the wild. Habitat loss (from agriculture, dams, or climate change), chytridiomycosis, and invasive trout are threats.

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ANI110-00008

An endangered Mazán harlequin toad (Atelopus exiguus) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Parque Nacional Cajas, Azuay Province, Ecuador. The population used to be very common but now there are only six individuals known. They are breeding yet and extremely hard to find in the wild. Habitat loss (from agriculture, dams, or climate change), chytridiomycosis, and invasive trout are threats.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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