Photo

BIR067-00286

A red-shafted flicker (Colaptes auratus cafer) at Liberty Wildlife in Phoenix, AZ.

Photo

INS002-00025

A federally endangered Salt Creek Tiger Beetle (Cicindela nevadica lincolniana).
Shot at UNL’s East Campus.

Photo

BIR057-00076

A southern crested caracara (Caracara plancus) at the Gladys Porter Zoo in Brownsville, Texas.

Photo

INS007-00251

An Eastern tailed-blue butterfly (Cupido comyntas) from Neale Woods in Butler County, Nebraska.

Photo

INS007-00252

A Viceroy butterfly (Limenitis archippus) at the Lincoln Children’s Zoo in Lincoln, Nebraska.

Photo

INS007-00254

A Viceroy butterfly (Limenitis archippus) at the Lincoln Children’s Zoo in Lincoln, Nebraska.

Photo

INS007-00258

A Giant swallowtail butterfly (Papilio cresphontes) at the Lincoln Children’s Zoo in Lincoln, Nebraska.

Photo

INS007-00259

A Giant swallowtail butterfly (Papilio cresphontes) at the Lincoln Children’s Zoo in Lincoln, Nebraska.

Photo

BIR053-00028

A racquet-tailed roller (Coracias spatulatus) at the Columbus Zoo.

Photo

ESA002-00393

Miss Sandy Hill, a federally endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. Only 110 of this sandhill crane subspecies exists in the wild. Only another 45 birds are in captivity.

Photo

ANI031-00129

Domestic rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) that are up for adoption at the Capital Humane Society.

Photo

ANI019-00260

Hasari, a federally endangered three-year-old cheetah, at White Oak Conservation Center.

Photo

BIR034-00066

An Atlantic puffin (Fratercula arctica) in winter plumage at the National Aquarium in Baltimore.

Photo

ANI065-00497

Thai bamboo rat snake (Elaphe porphyracea coxi) at the Miller Park Zoo.

Photo

ANI073-00205

A common Monkey Lizard (Polychrus marmoratus) at the National Aquarium, Baltimore.

Photo

INS021-00010

An entomologist scouts for El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

Photo

ESA002-00048

A federally endangered woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou).

Photo

ESA002-00041

Endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered mountain yellow-legged frogs (Rana muscosa). Population locality: San Bernardino.

Photo

ESA002-00042

An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered mountain yellow-legged frog (Rana muscosa). Population locality: San Bernardino.

Photo

ESA002-00008

A critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Santa Catalina Island fox (Urocyon littoralis catalinae). The foxes were trapped for an island-wide population estimate, as well as for vaccinations and various studies.

Photo

ANI025-00498

An endangered (IUCN) relict leopard frog (Lithobates onca) caught near the Hoover Dam. This animal’s habitat has been reduced over the years substantially. Though it is a candidate species for federal protection, federal and state agencies are working to ensure that it doesn’t need to be listed.

Photo

SCE051-00351

Great frigatebirds (Fregata minor) in flight on Tower Island in Galapagos National Park. The males display their giant red neck sacks in hope of attracting a female.

Photo

SCE051-00316

Shown are marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) on Santa Cruz Island, Galapagos National Park.

Photo

SCE051-00288

A tame Galapagos sea lion (Zalophus wollebaeki) beg for fish scraps at a fish market in the town of Puerto Ayora, on Santa Cruz Island.

Photo

SCE051-00285

A zig-zag spider (Neoscona cooksoni) on Floreana Island, in Galapagos National Park. The zig-zag is a species endemic to the Galapagos.

Photo

SCE051-00287

A tame Galapagos sea lion (Zalophus wollebaeki) beg for fish scraps at a fish market in the town of Puerto Ayora, on Santa Cruz Island.

Photo

SCE051-00183

One of the rarest birds in the world, the lava gull (Leucophaeus fuliginosus) on Santa Cruz Island, on the edge of Galapagos National Park.

Photo

SCE051-00127

A beetle (probably Calosoma galapageium Hope) on Urbina Bay, Isabela Island.

Photo

SCE051-00137

Flightless cormorant (Phalacrocorax harrisi) at Tagus Cove in Galapagos National Park. With only 1500 estimated individuals, it is one of the world’s rarest birds and is the subject of an active conservation program.

Photo

SCE051-00056

Galapagos mockingbird (Mimus parvulus) with a grasshopper in its mouth, on Rabida Island in the Galapagos.

Photo

INS007-00087

Miami blue butterfly (Cyclargus thomasi bethunebakeri). This species is being captive bred at the McGuire Center at the Univ. of Florida. Thousands have been released into the wild in South Florida over the past three years. So far, results are indeterminate. Fewer than 250 exist in the wild, making it one of the rarest butterflies in North America.

Photo

INS020-00012

A federally endangered Salt Creek tiger beetle (Cicindela nevadica lincolniana) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. With a count of fewer than 250 adults in the summer of 2007, this subspecies of tiger beetle could be the rarest insect in North America. Found only in the interior saline wetlands of Lancaster County, Nebraska, the beetle has been in decline for years due to habitat loss from development.

Photo

INS020-00010

A federally endangered Salt Creek tiger beetle (Cicindela nevadica lincolniana) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. With a count of fewer than 250 adults in the summer of 2007, this subspecies of tiger beetle could be the rarest insect in North America. Found only in the interior saline wetlands of Lancaster County, Nebraska, the beetle has been in decline for years due to habitat loss from development.

Photo

WOL002-00105

A federally endangered Mexican gray wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) at the Wild Canid Survival and Research Center.

Photo

WOL002-00106

A federally endangered Mexican gray wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) at the Wild Canid Survival and Research Center.

Photo

ESA001-00509

Sara, the endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered whooping crane (Grus americana), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. This is an educational bird.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

Speaking Engagements

Joel is a popular keynote speaker with conservation, corporate, and civic groups.

Hire him to entertain and inspire your audience.

Book Joel To Speak

The Photo Ark

Joel is the founder of the Photo Ark, a groundbreaking effort to document every species in captivity before it’s too late.

Explore the Photo Ark

Visit Our Store

Every purchase goes directly to support our mission: getting the public to care and helping to save species from extinction.

Help Us Build the Ark