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ANI014-00204

A Kuhl’s pipistrelle bat (Pipistrellus kuhlii kuhlii) at Centro Fauna Selvatica “Il Pettirosso”.

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ANI014-00205

A Savi’s pipistrelle (Hypsugo savii savii) at Centro Fauna Selvatica “Il Pettirosso”.

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ANI014-00206

A Savi’s pipistrelle (Hypsugo savii savii) at Centro Fauna Selvatica “Il Pettirosso”.

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ANI014-00200

A common noctule bat (Nyctalus noctula noctula) at Centro Fauna Selvatica “Il Pettirosso”.

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ANI014-00201

A common noctule bat (Nyctalus noctula noctula) at Centro Fauna Selvatica “Il Pettirosso”.

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ANI014-00202

A common noctule bat (Nyctalus noctula noctula) at Centro Fauna Selvatica “Il Pettirosso”.

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ANI014-00203

A Kuhl’s pipistrelle bat (Pipistrellus kuhlii kuhlii) at Centro Fauna Selvatica “Il Pettirosso”.

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ANI014-00196

A Curaçaoan long-nosed bat or southern long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris curasoae) at the Plzen Zoo in the Czech Republic. This species is listed as vulnerable.

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ANI014-00197

Pale spear nosed bat (Phyllostomus discolor) at the Plzen Zoo in the Czech Republic.

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ANI014-00198

Pale spear nosed bat (Phyllostomus discolor) at the Plzen Zoo in the Czech Republic.

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ANI014-00199

Pale spear nosed bat (Phyllostomus discolor) at the Plzen Zoo in the Czech Republic.

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ANI014-00194

A Curaçaoan long-nosed bat or southern long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris curasoae) at the Plzen Zoo in the Czech Republic. This species is listed as vulnerable.

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ANI014-00195

A Curaçaoan long-nosed bat or southern long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris curasoae) at the Plzen Zoo in the Czech Republic. This species is listed as vulnerable.

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ANI014-00191

Southeastern myotis (Myotis austroriparius) at Big Bend Wildlife Management Area.

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ANI014-00192

Southeastern myotis (Myotis austroriparius) at Big Bend Wildlife Management Area.

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ANI014-00193

Southeastern myotis (Myotis austroriparius) at Big Bend Wildlife Management Area.

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ANI014-00188

A Madagascan rousette (Rousettus madagascariensis) from Madagascar.

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ANI014-00189

A Madagascan rousette (Rousettus madagascariensis) from Madagascar.

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ANI014-00190

A Madagascan rousette (Rousettus madagascariensis) from Madagascar.

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ANI014-00185

A vulnerable northern long eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis) being cared for by Nebraska Wildlife Rehab.

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ANI014-00186

A vulnerable northern long eared (Myotis septentrionalis) being cared for by Nebraska Wildlife Rehab.

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ANI014-00187

A vulnerable northern long eared (Myotis septentrionalis) being cared for by Nebraska Wildlife Rehab.

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ANI014-00180

A female evening bat (Nycticeius humeralis) named ‘Io’ at the WildCare Foundation.

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ANI014-00181

A female evening bat (Nycticeius humeralis) at the WildCare Foundation.

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ANI014-00179

A female fringe-lipped bat (Trachops cirrhosus) from the wild in Gamboa, Panama.

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ANI014-00176

A Pallas’s long-tongued bat (Glossophaga soricina) at the Houston Zoo.

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ANI014-00177

A Jamaican fruit bat (Artibeus jamaicensis) at the Houston Zoo.

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ANI014-00175

A vulnerable, federally endangered lesser long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris yerbabuenae) at the Fort Worth Zoo.

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SCE054-00113

A cave with thousands of Egyptian fruit bats in the Maramagambo Forest in Africa.

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ANI014-00170

A female fringe-lipped bat, Trachops cirrhosus, at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute.

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ANI014-00171

A female fringe-lipped bat, Trachops cirrhosus, at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute.

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ANI014-00172

A female fringe-lipped bat, Trachops cirrhosus, at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute.

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ANI014-00173

A female fringe-lipped bat, Trachops cirrhosus, at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute.

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ANI014-00174

A female fringe-lipped bat, Trachops cirrhosus. Also sometimes known as the frog-eating bat. The function of the mouth tubercles are a mystery. Its long been hypothesized that they are used for chemo-reception, that the bat can fly over a frog or toad and just brush its skin with its lips, thus very quickly (and non-lethally) assess the palatability of its prey. Nobody knows for sure though.

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ANI014-00167

A silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans) at the Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Northern Utah.

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ANI014-00168

A silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans) at the Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Northern Utah.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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