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A vulnerable grey-headed flying fox (Pteropus poliocephalus) at the Australian Bat Clinic. Bats act as pollinators and seed dispensers, however bats are in serious decline around Australia largely due to entanglement in fruit tree netting.

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Little red flying fox (Pteropus scapulatus) from the Australian Bat Clinic and Narrow Leaf Retreat.

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An injured black flying fox delicately “tastes” Joel’s thumb at the Australia Bat Clinic in Advancetown, Queensland. Huge bats such as these are smart, social and play extremely critical roles in the environment, both as pollinators of crops and as seed dispersers.

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Joel Sartore’s photo of a bat is featured on the cover of the January-February 2011 issue of NEBRASKAland magazine.

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A studio portrait of an eastern red bat, Lasiurus borealis.

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A studio portrait of an eastern red bat, Lasiurus borealis.

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A biologist holds a bat that was killed by a wind turbine on a wind farm in southwest Pennsylvania. Biologists calculate that an average of 32 bats and nearly 5 birds are killed per turbine per season here, having a deadly effect on migrating wildlife.

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One turbine’s deadly harvest: biologists calculate that on average, 32 bats and five birds are killed in one season by each turbine on this wind farm in southwest Pennsylvania. Big birds aren’t immune, as this red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) shows.

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Mexican free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) swirl out of the Eckert James River Bat Cave at sunset to feed on insects. This maternity colony builds to more than 6 million bats in late July, making it one of the largest in the world. It is owned and managed by The Nature Conservancy.

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Mexican free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) swirl out of the Eckert James River Bat Cave at sunset to feed on insects. This maternity colony builds to more than 6 million bats in late July, making it one of the largest in the world. It is owned and managed by The Nature Conservancy.

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A big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus fuscus) at Nebraska Wildlife Rehab.

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A big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus fuscus) at Nebraska Wildlife Rehab.

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A big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus fuscus) at Nebraska Wildlife Rehab.

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A big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus fuscus) at Nebraska Wildlife Rehab.

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A big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus fuscus) at Nebraska Wildlife Rehab.

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A big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus fuscus) at Nebraska Wildlife Rehab.

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A big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus fuscus) at Nebraska Wildlife Rehab.

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A coastal cave filled with what most likely are Noack’s roundleaf bats (Hipposideros ruber) in Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea.

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A coastal cave filled with what most likely are Noack’s roundleaf bats (Hipposideros ruber) in Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea.

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A coastal cave filled with what most likely are Noack’s roundleaf bats (Hipposideros ruber) in Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea.

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A coastal cave filled with what most likely are Noack’s roundleaf bats (Hipposideros ruber) in Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea.

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A coastal cave filled with what most likely are Noack’s roundleaf bats (Hipposideros ruber) in Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea.

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A coastal cave filled with what most likely are Noack’s roundleaf bats (Hipposideros ruber) in Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea.

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A coastal cave filled with what most likely are Noack’s roundleaf bats (Hipposideros ruber) in Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea.

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A coastal cave filled with what most likely are Noack’s roundleaf bats (Hipposideros ruber) in Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea.

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A coastal cave filled with what most likely are Noack’s roundleaf bats (Hipposideros ruber) in Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea.

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A coastal cave filled with what most likely are Noack’s roundleaf bats (Hipposideros ruber) in Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea.

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A coastal cave filled with what most likely are Noack’s roundleaf bats (Hipposideros ruber) in Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea.

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A coastal cave filled with what most likely are Noack’s roundleaf bats (Hipposideros ruber) in Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea.

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A coastal cave filled with what most likely are Noack’s roundleaf bats (Hipposideros ruber) in Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea.

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A coastal cave filled with what most likely are Noack’s roundleaf bats (Hipposideros ruber) in Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea.

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A coastal cave filled with what most likely are Noack’s roundleaf bats (Hipposideros ruber) in Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea.

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A coastal cave filled with what most likely are Noack’s roundleaf bats (Hipposideros ruber) in Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea.

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A common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus) at the Buffalo Zoo, Buffalo, New York.

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A common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus) at the Buffalo Zoo, Buffalo, New York.

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A common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus) at the Buffalo Zoo, Buffalo, New York.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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