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An emerald beetle (Smaragdestes orzini) at the Cincinnati Zoo.

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A tortoise beetle (Aspidomorpha citrina) in Gorongosa National Park. These beetles feed on leaves, and their larvae have an interesting habit of camouflaging themselves with their own feces.

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A tortoise beetle (Aspidomorpha citrina) in Gorongosa National Park. These beetles feed on leaves, and their larvae have an interesting habit of camouflaging themselves with their own feces.

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A tortoise beetle (Aspidomorpha citrina) in Gorongosa National Park. These beetles feed on leaves, and their larvae have an interesting habit of camouflaging themselves with their own feces.

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A whirligig beetle (Dineutes sp.) in the family Gyrinidae collected in Gorongosa National Park. They have compound eyes- divided into lower and upper halves, which give them perfect vision above and below the water surface.

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The federally endangered Salt Creek tiger beetle, Cicindela nevadica lincolniana.

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The federally endangered Salt Creek tiger beetle, Cicindela nevadica lincolniana.

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A swamp milkweed leaf beetle (Labidomera clivicollis) at the Audubon Insectarium in New Orleans.

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Pleasing fungus beetle (Megalodacne fasciata) at the Audubon Insectarium in New Orleans.

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Swamp milkweed leaf beetle (Labidomera clivicollis) at the Audubon Insectarium in New Orleans.

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Brown-and-yellow flower beetles (Pachnoda sinuata flaviventris) at the Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo.

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Larval stage of the atlas beetle (Chalcosoma atlas) at the Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo. When grown into an adult, this type of beetle is able to lift 850 times its own body weight making it the strongest animal on earth compared to its body weight.

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A zookeeper holds two larva of the atlas beetle (Chalcosoma atlas) at the Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo.When grown into an adult, this type of beetle is able to lift 850 times its own body weight making it the strongest animal on earth compared to its body weight.

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Pupal stage of the atlas beetle (Chalcosoma atlas) at the Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo. When grown into an adult, this type of beetle is able to lift 850 times its own body weight making it the strongest animal on earth compared to its body weight.

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A male Atlas beetle (Chalcosoma atlas) and a female (smaller, hornless) at the Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo. This type of beetle is able to lift 850 times its own body weight making it the strongest animal on earth compared to its body weight.

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A blue death-feigning beetle (Asboulus verrucosus) at the Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo.

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A beetle (probably Calosoma galapageium Hope) on Urbina Bay, Isabela Island.

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A beetle (probably Calosoma galapageium Hope) on Urbina Bay, Isabela Island.

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The Salt Creek tiger beetle (Cicindela nevadica lincolniana) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. With a count of fewer than 205 adults in the summer of 2010, this subspecies of tiger beetle could be the rarest insect in North America. Found only in the interior saline wetlands of Lancaster County, Nebraska, the beetle has been in decline for years due to habitat loss from development. (US: Endangered)

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A federally endangered Salt Creek tiger beetle (Cicindela nevadica lincolniana) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. With a count of fewer than 250 adults in the summer of 2007, this subspecies of tiger beetle could be the rarest insect in North America. Found only in the interior saline wetlands of Lancaster County, Nebraska, the beetle has been in decline for years due to habitat loss from development.

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A federally endangered Salt Creek tiger beetle (Cicindela nevadica lincolniana) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. With a count of fewer than 250 adults in the summer of 2007, this subspecies of tiger beetle could be the rarest insect in North America. Found only in the interior saline wetlands of Lancaster County, Nebraska, the beetle has been in decline for years due to habitat loss from development.

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A federally endangered Salt Creek tiger beetle (Cicindela nevadica lincolniana) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. With a count of fewer than 250 adults in the summer of 2007, this subspecies of tiger beetle could be the rarest insect in North America. Found only in the interior saline wetlands of Lancaster County, Nebraska, the beetle has been in decline for years due to habitat loss from development.

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A federally endangered Salt Creek tiger beetle (Cicindela nevadica lincolniana) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. With a count of fewer than 250 adults in the summer of 2007, this subspecies of tiger beetle could be the rarest insect in North America. Found only in the interior saline wetlands of Lancaster County, Nebraska, the beetle has been in decline for years due to habitat loss from development.

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A federally endangered Salt Creek tiger beetle (Cicindela nevadica lincolniana) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. With a count of fewer than 250 adults in the summer of 2007, this subspecies of tiger beetle could be the rarest insect in North America. Found only in the interior saline wetlands of Lancaster County, Nebraska, the beetle has been in decline for years due to habitat loss from development.

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A federally endangered Salt Creek tiger beetle (Cicindela nevadica lincolniana) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. With a count of fewer than 250 adults in the summer of 2007, this subspecies of tiger beetle could be the rarest insect in North America. Found only in the interior saline wetlands of Lancaster County, Nebraska, the beetle has been in decline for years due to habitat loss from development.

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A federally endangered Salt Creek tiger beetle (Cicindela nevadica lincolniana) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. With a count of fewer than 250 adults in the summer of 2007, this subspecies of tiger beetle could be the rarest insect in North America. Found only in the interior saline wetlands of Lancaster County, Nebraska, the beetle has been in decline for years due to habitat loss from development.

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A federally endangered Salt Creek tiger beetle (Cicindela nevadica lincolniana) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. With a count of fewer than 250 adults in the summer of 2007, this subspecies of tiger beetle could be the rarest insect in North America. Found only in the interior saline wetlands of Lancaster County, Nebraska, the beetle has been in decline for years due to habitat loss from development.

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A federally endangered Salt Creek tiger beetle (Cicindela nevadica lincolniana) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. With a count of fewer than 250 adults in the summer of 2007, this subspecies of tiger beetle could be the rarest insect in North America. Found only in the interior saline wetlands of Lancaster County, Nebraska, the beetle has been in decline for years due to habitat loss from development.

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A federally endangered Salt Creek tiger beetle (Cicindela nevadica lincolniana) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. With a count of fewer than 250 adults in the summer of 2007, this subspecies of tiger beetle could be the rarest insect in North America. Found only in the interior saline wetlands of Lancaster County, Nebraska, the beetle has been in decline for years due to habitat loss from development.

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A federally endangered Salt Creek tiger beetle (Cicindela nevadica lincolniana) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. With a count of fewer than 250 adults in the summer of 2007, this subspecies of tiger beetle could be the rarest insect in North America. Found only in the interior saline wetlands of Lancaster County, Nebraska, the beetle has been in decline for years due to habitat loss from development.

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A federally endangered Salt Creek tiger beetle (Cicindela nevadica lincolniana) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. With a count of fewer than 250 adults in the summer of 2007, this subspecies of tiger beetle could be the rarest insect in North America. Found only in the interior saline wetlands of Lancaster County, Nebraska, the beetle has been in decline for years due to habitat loss from development.

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A weevil (Coleoptera sp.) from Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea.

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A weevil (Coleoptera sp.) from Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea.

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A critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered American burying beetle (Nicrophorus americanus) at the St. Louis Zoo, St. Louis, Missouri.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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