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BIR041-00024

A juvenile caught by biologists. They hope to track its movements through Alaskan oilfields.

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BIR041-00023

A juvenile caught by biologists. They hope to track its movements through Alaskan oilfields.

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ONA007-00144

Mussel biologist Steve Ahlstedt shows off coal fines, the sediments from Virginia’s coal mines that wash into the rivers of Tennessee. It is thought that coal fines and the use of heavy industrial chemicals to clean coal in Viriginia are both major factors in the disappearance of rare Mussels in the Clinch and Powell Rivers, two of the last places where many rare mussels were found.

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BIR049-00042

A biologist studies a federally endangered male Florida grasshopper sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum floridanus). This sparrow was photographed inside of a shooting tent at the Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park, one of the last examples of Florida dry prairie which is an essential habitat for species like this one.

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BIR049-00043

A biologist studies a federally endangered male Florida grasshopper sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum floridanus). This sparrow was photographed inside of a shooting tent at the Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park, one of the last examples of Florida dry prairie which is an essential habitat for species like this one.

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ESA002-00357

Endangered freshwater mussels. Mussels are the most endangered fauna species, with 50% of them now either threatened, endangered, or extinct.

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ONA005-00002

Biologist scout for federally-endangered birds at Kissemmee Prarie State Park.

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ONA007-00075

A biologist radio collars a lioness in the Ishasha Section of Queen Elizabeth National Park.

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ANI025-00501

A biologist holds up an endangered (IUCN) relict leopard frog (Lithobates onca) near the Hoover Dam. This animal’s habitat has been reduced over the years substantially. Though it is a candidate species for federal protection, federal and state agencies are working to ensure that it doesn’t need to be listed.

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INS009-00047

A biological technician and an intern search for the federally endangered Iowa Pleistocene Snail (Discus macclintocki).

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INS009-00041

Joel on assignment photographing the federally endangered Iowa Pleistocene snail (Discus macclintocki).

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INS009-00042

Joel on assignment photographing the federally endangered Iowa Pleistocene snail (Discus macclintocki).

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INS009-00043

A biologist studying the federally endangered Iowa Pleistocene snail (Discus macclintocki).

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INS009-00045

Joel on assignment photographing the federally endangered Iowa Pleistocene snail (Discus macclintocki).

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ESA001-00187

Red knot (Calidris canutus ssp. rufa), a candidate species for listing due to a rapid decline in population. The bird is dependent on one food during it’s northward migration: horseshoe crab eggs. Overfishing of the crabs has led a dramatic the decline of both knots and crabs. This bird was captured as part of a banding study by the Delaware Bay Shorebird Project.

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ESA001-00180

The federally endangered blowout penstemon (Penstemon haydenii) and the botonist who brought the plant back from just 600 individual plants to more than 20,000 today.

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ESA001-00186

Red knot (Calidris canutus ssp. rufa), a candidate species for listing due to a rapid decline in population. The bird is dependent on one food during it’s northward migration: horseshoe crab eggs. Overfishing of the crabs has led a dramatic the decline of both knots and crabs. This bird was captured as part of a banding study by the Delaware Bay Shorebird Project.

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ANI077-00224

A biologist lifts rocks hunting for snakes in the Ozarks of southern Missouri.

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ANI077-00225

A biologist lifts rocks hunting for snakes in the Ozarks of southern Missouri.

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ANI077-00223

A biologist lifts rocks hunting for snakes in the Ozarks of southern Missouri.

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ANI082-00099

Biologists collect samples from a vulnerable (IUCN) and federally threatened bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) Clark Fork River, Idaho.

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ANI082-00087

A biologist holds a bat that was killed by a wind turbine on a wind farm in southwest Pennsylvania. Biologists calculate that an average of 32 bats and nearly 5 birds are killed per turbine per season here, having a deadly effect on migrating wildlife.

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ANI082-00059

A road-killed bobcat (Lynx rufus) that has been placed along a highway near the Santa Anna NWR. USFWS biologists are conducting a study to determine how often passers will to pick up and take a dead bobcat, which often is just a few minutes. This may be skewing biologist’s road kill statistics.

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ANI082-00060

A USFWS wildlife biologist, runs a radio telemtery set for bobcat signals along the wall on the Lower Rio Grande NWR near Santa Maria. The wall bisects many of the tiny habitat tracts that remain along the border.

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SCE048-00095

A scientist shows the deep freeze in his lab, which contains the DNA of all the frogs in their collection, a kind of frozen ark.

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SCE048-00096

A scientist shows the deep freeze in his lab, which contains the DNA of all the frogs in their collection, a kind of frozen ark.

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SCE048-00073

A scientist examines and feeds captive frogs at the captive breeding facility known as Balsa de los Sapos, or Amphibian Ark, at Quito’s Catholic University, Ecuador.

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SCE048-00072

A scientist holds an endangered San Lucas marsupial frog (Gastrotheca pseustes) at the captive breeding facility known as Balsa de los Sapos, or Amphibian Ark, at Quito’s Catholic University, Ecuador.

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SCE049-00022

A scientist holds a Mount Lyell salamander (Hydromantes platycephalus) in the Sixty Lake Basin of King’s Canyon National Park, Nevada.

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SCE049-00009

A biologist working for the National Parks Service holds an introduced (non-native) trout at the Sixty Lake Basin of King’s Canyon National Park, Nevada.

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SCE049-00010

A biologist working for the National Parks Service collects introduced (non-native) trout at the Sixty Lake Basin of King’s Canyon National Park, Nevada.

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SCE049-00011

A biologist working for the National Parks Service collects introduced (non-native) trout at the Sixty Lake Basin of King’s Canyon National Park, Nevada.

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SCE049-00012

A biologist working for the National Parks Service collects introduced (non-native) trout at the Sixty Lake Basin of King’s Canyon National Park, Nevada.

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SCE049-00013

A biologist working for the National Parks Service holds an introduced (non-native) trout at the Sixty Lake Basin of King’s Canyon National Park, Nevada.

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SCE049-00019

A scientist swabs a Mount Lyell salamander (Hydromantes platycephalus) to test for chytrid fungus in the Sixty Lake Basin of King’s Canyon National Park, Nevada.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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