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A biologist uses radio telemetry to track animals at the SESC reserved in Brazil’s Pantanal.

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In order to photograph the endangered El Segundo Blue Butterfly at LAX, photographer Joel Sartore asked a biologist licensed to handle and study the species to help him build a plexiglass box to enclose the insect temporarily, as jets roared overhead. After several days of work, it paid off see image INS003-00001.

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The endangered El Segundo blue butterfly clings to survival at the foot of a runway at LAX.

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Entomologist Steve Spomer walks down the bank of Salt Creekin northern Lancaster County, Nebraska, looking for the Salt Creek tiger beetle. The insect only exists in this rare inland saline marsh, and is threatened by development.

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Entomologist Steve Spomer walks down the bank of Salt Creekin northern Lancaster County, Nebraska, looking for the Salt Creek tiger beetle. The insect only exists in this rare inland saline marsh, and is threatened by development.

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Scientists at the Toolik Research Center study the effects of global warming on the tundra. If the permafrost melts, the amount of carbon released into the air could make man-madeemissions look trivial, the scientists said. Shown are botanists studying a thermokarst in which the permafrost has melted away

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Scientists at the Toolik Research Center study the effects of global warming on the tundra. If the permafrost melts, the amount of carbon released into the air could make man-madeemissions look trivial, the scientists said. Shown are botanists studying tundra plants by the square meter.

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Vernal pools like this one in California’s central valley are home to a number of unique species that have carved their niche in these seasonally flooded areas. Development and pollution from agricultural run off threaten the vernal pool habitat.

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A juvenile raven caught by biologists tries to fly away. Biologists hope to track its movements through Alaskan oilfields.

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Biologists tie down and net juvenile ravens in order to track their movements among Alaskan oil fields.

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Biologists band black brandt and check for avian flu on Alaska’s North Slope.

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White-fronted geese under go capture and leg banding by biologists on the western part of the Slope near Teshukpuk Lake. The on going study has surveyed the population, age and health of several goose species for decades in hope of better managing the flocks.

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White-fronted geese under go capture and leg banding by biologists on the western part of the Slope near Teshukpuk Lake. The on going study has surveyed the population, age and health of several goose species for decades in hope of better managing the flocks.

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A white-fronted goose runs to freedom after being leg-banded by biologists. Annual goose surveys take place in the Teshekpuk Lake area, home to critical nesting habitat for many species of waterfowl.

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Biologists gather white-fronted geese to band and test for the avian flu in Alaska’s North Slope near Teshukpuk Lake.

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Biologists gather white-fronted geese to band and test for the avian flu in Alaska’s North Slope near Teshukpuk Lake.

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White-fronted geese under go capture and leg banding by biologists on the western part of the Slope near Teshukpuk Lake. The on going study has surveyed the population, age and health of several goose species for decades in hope of better managing the flocks.

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White-fronted geese under go capture and leg banding by biologists on the western part of the Slope near Teshukpuk Lake. The on going study has surveyed the population, age and health of several goose species for decades in hope of better managing the flocks.

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A biologist removes an endangered California gnatcatcher from mist netting near Fullerton, CA.

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A biologist at the San Diego Wild Animal park displays the puppet used to feed juvenile condors so they don’t imprint on humans.

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A biologist at the San Diego Wild Animal park displays the puppet used to feed juvenile condors so they don’t imprint on humans.

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At the Sutton Avian Research Center, bald eagle eggs are hatched as part of the Southern Bald Eagle Restoration Program. This particular egg developed a small hole during incubation that workers mended with a special adhesive so that the chick could continue to develop and hatch.

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At the Sutton Avian Research Center, bald eagle eggs are hatched as part of the Southern Bald Eagle Restoration Program. This chick has bandages on his stomach to staunch bleeding where his stomach was connected to the inside of the egg.

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At the Sutton Avian Research Center, bald eagle eggs are hatched as part of the Southern Bald Eagle Restoration Program. This particular egg developed a small hole during incubation that workers mended with a special adhesive so that the chick could continue to develop and hatch.

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At the Sutton Avian Research Center, bald eagle eggs are hatched as part of the Southern Bald Eagle Restoration Program. This particular egg developed a small hole during incubation that workers mended with a special adhesive so that the chick could continue to develop and hatch.

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At the Sutton Avian Research Center, bald eagle eggs are hatched as part of the Southern Bald Eagle Restoration Program. This particular egg developed a small hole during incubation that workers mended with a special adhesive so that the chick could continue to develop.

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At the Sutton Avian Research Center, bald eagle eggs are hatched as part of the Southern Bald Eagle Restoration Program. This particular egg developed a small hole during incubation that workers mended with a special adhesive so that the chick could continue to develop.

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At the Sutton Avian Research Center, bald eagle eggs are hatched as part of the Southern Bald Eagle Restoration Program.

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Biologists at the Sutton Avian Research Center’s Southern bald eagle recovery program wear camouflage ghost costumes around the young eagles. This keeps the birds from imprintingon humans.

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A recently hatched bald eagle rests in the hand of a biologist at the Sutton Avian Research Center in Oklahoma.

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Biologist Dick Shideler studies tranquilized Grizzly Bears in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska.

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Biologist Dick Shideler studies tranquilized Grizzly Bears in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska.

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Biologist Dick Shideler studies tranquilized Grizzly Bears in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska.

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Biologists collared this tranquilized grizzly bear near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska on the Arctic coastal plain. They are studying how the bears live with the oil fields in the area.

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Biologists weigh and collar a tranquilized grizzly bear near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska on the Arctic coastal plain. They arestudying how the bears live with the oil fields in the area.

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Biologists collared this tranquilized grizzly bear near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska on the Arctic coastal plain. They are studying how the bears live with the oil fields in the area.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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