Dear Friends: We are still open for business, but it might take longer to fill your orders and requests as we have shifted to minimal staffing as a precaution against COVID-19. We appreciate your patience.

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Red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) at Tracy Aviary.

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A zookeeper with lilac-breasted rollers at the Omaha Zoo.

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A bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) named Bensar at the George M. Sutton Avian Research Center.

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Buckwheat, a golden Polish chicken at the Soukup Farm.

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Madagascar ibis (Lophotibis cristata) at the Omaha Zoo.

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White-backed magpies (Gymnorhina tibicen hypoleuca) at the Oklahoma City Zoo.

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A male (front) and female brown-headed cowbird (Molothrus ater) at the San Antonio Zoo.

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A western red-billed hornbill (Tockus erythrorhynchus kempi) at Sylvan Heights Bird Park in Scotland Neck, North Carolina.

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A western red-billed hornbill (Tockus erythrorhynchus kempi) at Sylvan Heights Bird Park in Scotland Neck, North Carolina.

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A western red-billed hornbill (Tockus erythrorhynchus kempi) at Sylvan Heights Bird Park in Scotland Neck, North Carolina.

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A western red-billed hornbill (Tockus erythrorhynchus kempi) at Sylvan Heights Bird Park in Scotland Neck, North Carolina.

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A pair of black-headed ducks (Heteronetta atricapilla) at Sylvan Heights Bird Park in Scotland Neck, North Carolina.

The male is darker, while the female is brown.

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A male black-headed duck (Heteronetta atricapilla) at Sylvan Heights Bird Park in Scotland Neck, North Carolina.

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A male black-headed duck (Heteronetta atricapilla) at Sylvan Heights Bird Park in Scotland Neck, North Carolina.

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A male black-headed duck (Heteronetta atricapilla) at Sylvan Heights Bird Park in Scotland Neck, North Carolina.

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A fawn-breasted bowerbird (Chlamydera cerviniventris) at Sylvan Heights Bird Park in Scotland Neck, North Carolina.

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A fawn-breasted bowerbird (Chlamydera cerviniventris) at Sylvan Heights Bird Park in Scotland Neck, North Carolina.

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A fawn-breasted bowerbird (Chlamydera cerviniventris) at Sylvan Heights Bird Park in Scotland Neck, North Carolina.

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A timor zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata timor) at Sylvan Heights Bird Park in Scotland Neck, North Carolina.

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A timor zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata timor) at Sylvan Heights Bird Park in Scotland Neck, North Carolina.

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A Senegal thick-knee (Burhinus senegalensis) at Sylvan Heights Bird Park in Scotland Neck, North Carolina.

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A Senegal thick-knee (Burhinus senegalensis) at Sylvan Heights Bird Park in Scotland Neck, North Carolina.

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A Senegal thick-knee (Burhinus senegalensis) at Sylvan Heights Bird Park in Scotland Neck, North Carolina.

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A Senegal thick-knee (Burhinus senegalensis) at Sylvan Heights Bird Park in Scotland Neck, North Carolina.

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A hairy woodpecker (Leuconotopicus villosus) at the Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Minnesota.

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A hairy woodpecker (Leuconotopicus villosus) at the Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Minnesota.

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A hairy woodpecker (Leuconotopicus villosus) at the Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Minnesota.

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An American robin (Turdus migratorius migratorius) at Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. in St. Louis, Missouri. This bird is either nominate or nigrideus subspecies.

The tail of this bird was pulled off by a cat. Hundreds of millions of birds are killed by house cats in the United States every year

Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. is the only songbird rehabilitation center in the state of Missouri. They have been open for 25 years and help rehabilitate over 2,500 wild birds every year.

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An American robin (Turdus migratorius migratorius) at Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. in St. Louis, Missouri. This bird is either nominate or nigrideus subspecies.

The tail of this bird was pulled off by a cat. Hundreds of millions of birds are killed by house cats in the United States every year

Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. is the only songbird rehabilitation center in the state of Missouri. They have been open for 25 years and help rehabilitate over 2,500 wild birds every year.

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A Carolina wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus) at Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. in St. Louis, Missouri.

This bird was caught in fly paper, a common death trap for songbirds, along with the sticky traps used for mice and insects. It’s important to not use these devices in areas where songbirds are present.

Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. is the only songbird rehabilitation center in the state of Missouri. They have been open for 25 years and help rehabilitate over 2,500 wild birds every year.

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An American goldfinch (Spinus tristis tristis) at Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. in St. Louis, Missouri.

Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. is the only songbird rehabilitation center in the state of Missouri. They have been open for 25 years and help rehabilitate over 2,500 wild birds every year.

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An American goldfinch (Spinus tristis tristis) at Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. in St. Louis, Missouri.

Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. is the only songbird rehabilitation center in the state of Missouri. They have been open for 25 years and help rehabilitate over 2,500 wild birds every year.

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A cedar waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum cedrorum) at Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. in St. Louis, Missouri.

Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. is the only songbird rehabilitation center in the state of Missouri. They have been open for 25 years and help rehabilitate over 2,500 wild birds every year.

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A cedar waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum cedrorum) at Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. in St. Louis, Missouri.

Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. is the only songbird rehabilitation center in the state of Missouri. They have been open for 25 years and help rehabilitate over 2,500 wild birds every year.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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