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BIR050-00081-1

A Toco toucan (Ramphastos toco) at the Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium.

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BIR040-00160-1

A southern bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus leucocephalus) at Sia, the Comanche Nation Ethno-Ornithological Initiative.

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BIR035-00049-1

American flamingos (Phoenicopterus ruber) at the Lincoln Children’s Zoo.

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BIR043-00036-1

A double-wattled cassowary (Casuarius casuarius sclateri) at a private collection in Jakarta, Indonesia. This animal is under the care of PT. Alam Nusantara Jayatama.

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BIR032-00472-1

A male Mandarin duck (Aix galericulata) from a private collection.

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BIR031-00115-1

An Eurasian jay (Garrulus glandarius fasciatus) at Parque Biologico.

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BIR055-00161-1

A male African green pigeon (Treron calvus) at the Dallas World Aquarium.

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BIR053-00237-1

Kambo, a red-crested turaco (Tauraco erythrolophus), at Tracy Aviary.

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BIR053-00201-1

A racket-tailed roller (Coracias spatulatus) at the Columbus Zoo.

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BIR036-00146

Humboldt penguins (Spheniscus humboldti) at Great Plains Zoo.

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BIR006-00222

A studio portrait of a brood of Cornish chicks, Gallus gallus domesticus.

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BIR045-00126

An eastern bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus virginianus) named ‘Quailman’ at the Brevard Zoo.

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BIR045-00125

An eastern bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus virginianus) named ‘Quailman’ at the Brevard Zoo.

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BIR053-00478

A California towhee (Melozone crissalis) at Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network.

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A California towhee (Melozone crissalis) at Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network.

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BIR053-00476

A male and female juvenile hooded oriole, (Icterus cucullatus) at the Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network.

The female is drab while the male has more yellow (in front).

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BIR053-00475

A female, juvenile hooded oriole (Icterus cucullatus) at Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network.

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BIR053-00474

A pair of great-tailed grackle (Quiscalus mexicanus) at Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network.

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BIR053-00473

A pair of great-tailed grackle (Quiscalus mexicanus) at Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network.

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BIR053-00472

A great-tailed grackle (Quiscalus mexicanus) at Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network.

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BIR053-00471

An oak titmouse (Baeolophus mexicanus) at Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network.

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BIR053-00470

An oak titmouse (Baeolophus mexicanus) at Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network.

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BIR053-00469

An oak titmouse (Baeolophus mexicanus) at Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network.

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BIR053-00468

An oak titmouse (Baeolophus mexicanus) at Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network.

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BIR053-00465

A king rail (Rallus elegans) at the Carolina Wildlife Center, a place that rescues and rehabilitates injured and orphaned wildlife.

They get about 3,700 wildlife patients a year, from gray squirrels to opossums to songbirds.

This bird was found wandering on a football field at Williams-Bryce Stadium at the University of South Carolina.

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BIR053-00464

A king rail (Rallus elegans) at the Carolina Wildlife Center, a place that rescues and rehabilitates injured and orphaned wildlife.

They get about 3,700 wildlife patients a year, from gray squirrels to opossums to songbirds.

This bird was found wandering on a football field at Williams-Bryce Stadium at the University of South Carolina.

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BIR053-00463

A king rail (Rallus elegans) at the Carolina Wildlife Center, a place that rescues and rehabilitates injured and orphaned wildlife.

They get about 3,700 wildlife patients a year, from gray squirrels to opossums to songbirds.

This bird was found wandering on a football field at Williams-Bryce Stadium at the University of South Carolina.

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BIR053-00462

A king rail (Rallus elegans) at the Carolina Wildlife Center, a place that rescues and rehabilitates injured and orphaned wildlife.

They get about 3,700 wildlife patients a year, from gray squirrels to opossums to songbirds.

This bird was found wandering on a football field at Williams-Bryce Stadium at the University of South Carolina.

Photo

BIR053-00461

A king rail (Rallus elegans) at the Carolina Wildlife Center, a place that rescues and rehabilitates injured and orphaned wildlife.

They get about 3,700 wildlife patients a year, from gray squirrels to opossums to songbirds.

This bird was found wandering on a football field at Williams-Bryce Stadium at the University of South Carolina.

Photo

BIR053-00460

A northern mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos polyglottos) at the Carolina Wildlife Center, a place that rescues and rehabilitates injured and orphaned wildlife.

They get about 3,700 wildlife patients a year, from gray squirrels to opossums to songbirds.

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BIR053-00459

A northern mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos polyglottos) at the Carolina Wildlife Center, a place that rescues and rehabilitates injured and orphaned wildlife.

They get about 3,700 wildlife patients a year, from gray squirrels to opossums to songbirds.

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BIR076-00052

A hatch year, male common yellowthroat, (Geothlypis trichas) at Nebraska Wildlife Rehab.

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BIR076-00051

A hatch year, male common yellowthroat, (Geothlypis trichas) at Nebraska Wildlife Rehab.

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BIR057-00499

A Wilson’s warbler (Cardellina pusilla) at the Wildlife Rehab Center of Minnesota.

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A Wilson’s warbler (Cardellina pusilla) at the Wildlife Rehab Center of Minnesota.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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