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ANI110-00031

A critically endangered Coyne’s harlequin frog (Atelopus coynei) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Chinambi, Carchi Province, Ecuador. This species experiences habitat degradation due to deforestation, agriculture, human activities such as agriculture and cattle raising. Like most Atelopus species, climate change has raised temperatures, stressing this cold weather animal, leaving them vulnerable to chytrid fungus.

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ANI110-00029

A painted tree frog (Boana picturata) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from the Reserva Otokiki – Alto Tambo, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. The species experiences habitat loss due to mining, deforestation road constructions, farm activities, agriculture, mining and urban development.

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ANI110-00028

A pair of painted tree frogs (Boana picturata) in amplexus at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. These animals are originally from the Reserva Otokiki – Alto Tambo, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. The species experiences habitat loss due to mining, deforestation road constructions, farm activities, agriculture, mining and urban development.

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ANI110-00020

A condor dart poison frog (Dendrobates condor) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Cordillera del Condor – Paquisha Alto, Zamora Chinchipe Province, Ecuador.

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ANI110-00018

A Chinambi harlequin frog, Atelopus sp. nov. (Chinambi), at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Chinambí, Carchi Province, Ecuador. The known population area occurrence is tiny, and the habitat is affected by habitat destruction, mining activities, and floods in the river system as well.

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ANI110-00017

A Condor harlequin frog, Atelopus sp. nov. (Cordillera del Condor), at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Alto Nangaritza, Zamora Chinchipe Province, Ecuador. The population is affected by mining activities. There are a few individuals in captivity with no successful laboratory breeding yet. At the time this photograph was taken (January 2019) Centro Jambatu had 8 males and 2 females.

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ANI110-00015

A critically endangered Morona Santiago subfoot toad (Atelopus halihelos) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Zamora Chinchipe Province, Ecuador. This is a very rare species and it was the only individual in captivity at the time this photograph was taken (January 2019).

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ANI110-00014

A rubi poison frog (Ameerega parvula) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Shiripuno, Orellana Province, Ecuador. With this and many other species of poison dart frog, the male is in charge of the parental care.

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ANI110-00013

A rubi poison frog (Ameerega parvula) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Shiripuno, Orellana Province, Ecuador. With this and many other species of poison dart frog, the male is in charge of the parental care.

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ANI110-00010

A female Epibatidin dart poison frog (Epipedobates anthonyi) Santa Marta morph, at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Santa Marta, Azuay Province, Ecuador.

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ANI110-00008

An endangered Mazán harlequin toad (Atelopus exiguus) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Parque Nacional Cajas, Azuay Province, Ecuador. The population used to be very common but now there are only six individuals known. They are breeding yet and extremely hard to find in the wild. Habitat loss (from agriculture, dams, or climate change), chytridiomycosis, and invasive trout are threats.

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ANI110-00006

A critically endangered Jambato toad (Atelopus ignescens) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Angamarca in the Cotopaxi Province of Ecuador. This species used to be very common during the early 1980s but it was not seen for 28 years in the wild (between 1988 and 2016). However, one more wild population was found in 2016. A wild pair laid a clutch of eggs (about 600) in captivity in 2017, and nearly 200 juveniles are successfully growing and reaching adulthood at the time this photo was taken (in January 2019) at Centro Jambatu. This species could have been negatively affected by a global warming and also possible pathogens.

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ANI110-00003

A giant Blomberg toad (Rhaebo blombergi) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Siete Cascadas, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. A very large toad species, easily measuring up to 25 cm. Local people claim it has measured up to 40cm. The species is declining due to deforestation and agricultural activities, especially palm plantations. Other threats include mining and the introduction of exotic species to the wild.

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ANI110-00002

A giant Blomberg toad (Rhaebo blombergi) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Siete Cascadas, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. A very large toad species, easily measuring up to 25 cm. Local people claim it has measured up to 40cm. The species is declining due to deforestation and agricultural activities, especially palm plantations. Other threats include mining and the introduction of exotic species to the wild.

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ANI110-00001

A giant Blomberg toad (Rhaebo blombergi) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Siete Cascadas, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. A very large toad species, easily measuring up to 25 cm. Local people claim it has measured up to 40cm. The species is declining due to deforestation and agricultural activities, especially palm plantations. Other threats include mining and the introduction of exotic species to the wild.

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ANI101-00498

A limon harlequin toad (Atelopus sp.) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador.

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ANI101-00496

An endangered female elegant stubfoot toad (Atelopus elegans) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador.

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ANI101-00493

A male critically endangered Rio Pescado stubfoot toad (Atelopus balios) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador.

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ANI101-00492

A female critically endangered Rio Pescado stubfoot toad (Atelopus balios) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador.

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ANI101-00491

A male and a female critically endangered Rio Pescado stubfoot toads (Atelopus balios) in amplexus at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador.

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ANI101-00489

A mindo morph of the poison dart frog (Epipedobates darwinwallacei) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador.

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ANI101-00487

A pants nurse frog (Allobates femoralis) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador.

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ANI101-00485

A pucayacu morph of the Darwin-Wallace poison dart frog (Epipedobates darwinwallacei) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador.

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ANI101-00483

An ankas morph of the Epibatidin poison dart frog (Epipedobates anthonyi) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador.

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ANI101-00481

A rio morph of the tricolor poison dart frog (Epipedobates tricolor) at Centro Jamatu in Quito, Ecuador.

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ANI101-00479

A cielito morph of the tricolor poison dart frog (Epipedobates tricolor) at Centro Jamatu in Quito, Ecuador. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN.

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ANI101-00477

A diablo morph of the little devil poison dart frog (Oophaga sylvatica) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador.

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BIR069-00050

A Mrs. Hume’s pheasant (Syrmaticus humiae humiae) from a private collection.

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BIR069-00049

A Mrs. Hume’s pheasant (Syrmaticus humiae humiae) from a private collection.

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BIR069-00048

A Mrs. Hume’s pheasant (Syrmaticus humiae humiae) from a private collection.

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BIR069-00045

A golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) from a private collection.

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BIR069-00044

A golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) from a private collection.

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ANI102-00483

A Northern Pacific rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus oreganus) at the American International Rattlesnake Museum in Albuquerque, NM.

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ANI102-00482

A Northern Pacific rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus oreganus) at the American International Rattlesnake Museum in Albuquerque, NM.

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ANI102-00480

A Northern Pacific rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus oreganus) at the American International Rattlesnake Museum in Albuquerque, NM.

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ANI102-00479

A Northern Pacific rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus oreganus) at the American International Rattlesnake Museum in Albuquerque, NM.

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