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ANI075-00263

A very ill, critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) at the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital.

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BIR048-00117

An acorn woodpecker (Melanerpes formicivorus bairdi) at the Big Bear Alpine Zoo. This bird’s name is Narwhal.

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An acorn woodpecker (Melanerpes formicivorus bairdi) at the Big Bear Alpine Zoo. This bird’s name is Narwhal.

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BIR048-00115

An acorn woodpecker (Melanerpes formicivorus bairdi) at the Big Bear Alpine Zoo. This bird’s name is Narwhal.

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BIR064-00245

A red-necked tanager (Tangara cyanocephala cyanocephala) at the Membeca Lagos Farm, near Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

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A red-necked tanager (Tangara cyanocephala cyanocephala) at the Membeca Lagos Farm, near Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

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BIR064-00243

A red-necked tanager (Tangara cyanocephala cyanocephala) at the Membeca Lagos Farm, near Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

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BIR064-00242

A green-headed tanager (Tangara seledon) at the Membeca Lagos Farm, near Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

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BIR064-00241

A green-headed tanager (Tangara seledon) at the Membeca Lagos Farm, near Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

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BIR069-00200

A male brown eared pheasant (Crossoptilon mantchuricum) in Somerset County, England. This animal is listed as vulnerable by IUCN.

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BIR069-00199

A male brown eared pheasant (Crossoptilon mantchuricum) in Somerset County, England. This animal is listed as vulnerable by IUCN.

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A male brown eared pheasant (Crossoptilon mantchuricum) in Somerset County, England. This animal is listed as vulnerable by IUCN.

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BIR069-00197

A male brown eared pheasant (Crossoptilon mantchuricum) in Somerset County, England. This animal is listed as vulnerable by IUCN.

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BIR069-00070

A blue eared-pheasant (Crossoptilon auritum) at Tierpark Berlin.

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A blue eared-pheasant (Crossoptilon auritum) at Tierpark Berlin.

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BIR069-00068

A blue eared-pheasant (Crossoptilon auritum) at Tierpark Berlin.

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BIR020-00139

A lesser yellow-headed vulture (Cathartes burrovianus) at Tierpark Berlin.

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BIR020-00138

A lesser yellow-headed vulture (Cathartes burrovianus) at Tierpark Berlin.

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A lesser yellow-headed vulture (Cathartes burrovianus) at Tierpark Berlin.

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ANI110-00118

A male, endangered, elegant stubfoot toad (Atelopus elegans) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This is one of the few species of Atelopus not threatened by chytrid fungus because it lives at lower elevations in warmer climates.

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ANI110-00099

A venter motted rocket frog (Hyloxalus infragutattus) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal was originally from Norte de Bucay, Chimborazo Province, Ecuador. Threats to the species include farming, urban development, and Cacao plantations.

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ANI110-00098

A venter motted rocket frog (Hyloxalus infragutattus) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal was originally from Norte de Bucay, Chimborazo Province, Ecuador. Threats to the species include farming, urban development, and Cacao plantations.

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ANI110-00075

An endangered female gray-bellied marsupial frog (Gastrotheca litonedis) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Busa Lagoon, Azuay Province, Ecuador. This species is threatened by habitat loss.

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ANI110-00074

An endangered female gray-bellied marsupial frog (Gastrotheca litonedis) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Busa Lagoon, Azuay Province, Ecuador. This species is threatened by habitat loss.

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ANI110-00033

A critically endangered Coyne’s harlequin frog (Atelopus coynei) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Chinambi, Carchi Province, Ecuador. This species experiences habitat degradation due to deforestation, agriculture, human activities such as agriculture and cattle raising. Like most Atelopus species, climate change has raised temperatures, stressing this cold weather animal, leaving them vulnerable to chytrid fungus.

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ANI110-00032

A critically endangered Coyne’s harlequin frog (Atelopus coynei) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Chinambi, Carchi Province, Ecuador. This species experiences habitat degradation due to deforestation, agriculture, human activities such as agriculture and cattle raising. Like most Atelopus species, climate change has raised temperatures, stressing this cold weather animal, leaving them vulnerable to chytrid fungus.

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ANI110-00031

A critically endangered Coyne’s harlequin frog (Atelopus coynei) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Chinambi, Carchi Province, Ecuador. This species experiences habitat degradation due to deforestation, agriculture, human activities such as agriculture and cattle raising. Like most Atelopus species, climate change has raised temperatures, stressing this cold weather animal, leaving them vulnerable to chytrid fungus.

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ANI110-00023

Two critically endangered Limon harlequin frogs (Atelopus sp. spumarius complex) in amplexus at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. These two animals were originally from San Carlos de Limón, Morona Santiago Province, Ecuador. The captive breeding program has been successful in Centro Jambatu, saving the species from the extinction. The natural habitat of this species faces numerous obstacles, including loss due to mining, deforestation road constructions and farming activities.

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ANI110-00022

A critically endangered webbed harlequin frog, (Atelopus palmatus) a at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Rio Negro, Tungurahua Province, Ecuador. Its habitat is affected by habitat destruction, deforestation, agriculture, cattle raising and mining activities.

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ANI110-00005

A giant Blomberg toad (Rhaebo blombergi) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Siete Cascadas, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. A very large toad species, easily measuring up to 25 cm. Local people claim it has measured up to 40cm. The species is declining due to deforestation and agricultural activities, especially palm plantations. Other threats include mining and the introduction of exotic species to the wild.

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ANI110-00004

A giant Blomberg toad (Rhaebo blombergi) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Siete Cascadas, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. A very large toad species, easily measuring up to 25 cm. Local people claim it has measured up to 40cm. The species is declining due to deforestation and agricultural activities, especially palm plantations. Other threats include mining and the introduction of exotic species to the wild.

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ANI110-00003

A giant Blomberg toad (Rhaebo blombergi) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Siete Cascadas, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. A very large toad species, easily measuring up to 25 cm. Local people claim it has measured up to 40cm. The species is declining due to deforestation and agricultural activities, especially palm plantations. Other threats include mining and the introduction of exotic species to the wild.

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ANI110-00002

A giant Blomberg toad (Rhaebo blombergi) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Siete Cascadas, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. A very large toad species, easily measuring up to 25 cm. Local people claim it has measured up to 40cm. The species is declining due to deforestation and agricultural activities, especially palm plantations. Other threats include mining and the introduction of exotic species to the wild.

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ANI110-00001

A giant Blomberg toad (Rhaebo blombergi) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Siete Cascadas, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. A very large toad species, easily measuring up to 25 cm. Local people claim it has measured up to 40cm. The species is declining due to deforestation and agricultural activities, especially palm plantations. Other threats include mining and the introduction of exotic species to the wild.

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ANI101-00499

A limon harlequin toad (Atelopus sp.) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador.

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ANI101-00498

A limon harlequin toad (Atelopus sp.) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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