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A mother and daughter take a picture of themselves as they cross the Equator, near Isabella Island in Galapagos National Park.

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A guide encourages tourists to get on board a zodiac loading at day’s end on Rabida Island in Galapagos National Park.

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A Galapagos guide, prepares to leave the island of Rabida in Galapagos National Park.

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A nuetral density filter is explained to photography-interested guests on Rabida Island in Galapagos National Park.

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In this winter nursery for gray whales (Eschrichtius glaucus), one of the cetaceans swims close to two whale-watching boats, seeking contact with now-friendly humans. Restored to healthy populations, California grays were recently taken off the endangered list. Atlantic grays, however, were long ago hunted into extinction .

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A father and son view a fish kill, some of the 182 million fish which suffocated when organic matter depleted the oxygen supply in the Atchafalaya river basin after hurricane Andrew.

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A Louisiana-built oil drilling and production platform is carried by a Barge toward the Gulf of Mexico.

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Congealed tallow, spilled in careless loading, cakes a section of the Houston shipping channel in Galveston Bay, Texas. A cleanup worker sits in a dory nearby the confinement barriers.

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Vietnamese teenagers search for oysters with hands and feet to earn pocket money.

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A group of fisherman cleaning lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) at Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho.

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A group of fisherman cleaning lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) at Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho.

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On board a PHI helicopter/media flight covering the deep water horizon oil spill at the spill site, two types of burning are now going on. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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ENV021-00082

On board a PHI helicopter/media flight covering the deep water horizon oil spill at the spill site, two types of burning are now going on. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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ENV021-00083

On board a PHI helicopter/media flight covering the deep water horizon oil spill at the spill site, two types of burning are now going on. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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An aerial of an watercraft cutting through the surface oil near the deep water horizon spill site in the Gulf of Mexico.

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An aerial of watercraft cutting through the surface oil near the deep water horizon spill site in the Gulf of Mexico.

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A clean up crew hired by BP tries to sop oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, along the shoreline on Queen Bess island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana.

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Burning surface oil not far from the Deepwater Horizon spill site creates huge black columns of smoke in the Gulf of Mexico.

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Boats burning off surface oil not near the Deepwater Horizon spill site creating huge black columns of smoke in the Gulf of Mexico.

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This aerial shows two types of burn-offs used on the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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ENV021-00051

This aerial shows two types of burn-offs used on the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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Shrimp boats sit idle at the Myrtle Grove marina in Belle Chasse, Louisiana. The economic impact of the Deepwater Horizon spill will be felt for years to come.

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A former shrimping boat now trawls for oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in Barataria Bay, Louisiana.

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Hundreds of pipeline canals and shipping lanes have been cut into the coastal marshes of Louisiana. Each one allows more saltwater to intrude from the Gulf, killing the marsh and allowing more oil to penetrate from the Deepwater Horizon spill.

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A crew of BP contract workers remove booms saturated with oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill from important bird breeding habitat in the Gulf of Mexico.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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