Dear Friends: We are still open for business, but it might take longer to fill your orders and requests as we have shifted to minimal staffing as a precaution against COVID-19. We appreciate your patience.

Photo

ANI050-00032

Emi, a female Sumatran rhino at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of Emi’s calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

Photo

ANI050-00031

Emi, a female Sumatran rhino, with her three-week-old calf, at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of this calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

Photo

ANI050-00030

Emi, a female Sumatran rhino, with her three-week-old calf, at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of this calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

Photo

ANI050-00029

Emi, a female Sumatran rhino, with her three-week-old calf, at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of this calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

Photo

ANI050-00028

Emi, a female Sumatran rhino, with her three-week-old calf, at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of this calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

Photo

ANI050-00027

Emi, a female Sumatran rhino at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of Emi’s calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

Photo

FIS005-00027

A buffalo darter (Etheostoma bison) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center in Knoxville. This fish is common in its restricted range of the Upper and Buffalo Rivers in TN.

Photo

FIS005-00026

A buffalo darter (Etheostoma bison) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center in Knoxville. This fish is common in its restricted range of the Upper and Buffalo Rivers in TN.

Photo

FIS005-00025

A buffalo darter (Etheostoma bison) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center in Knoxville. This fish is common in its restricted range of the Upper and Buffalo Rivers in TN.

Photo

FIS005-00024

A buffalo darter (Etheostoma bison) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center in Knoxville. This fish is common in its restricted range of the Upper and Buffalo Rivers in TN.

Photo

FIS005-00023

A buffalo darter (Etheostoma bison) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center in Knoxville. This fish is common in its restricted range of the Upper and Buffalo Rivers in TN.

Photo

FIS005-00022

A buffalo darter (Etheostoma bison) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center in Knoxville. This fish is common in its restricted range of the Upper and Buffalo Rivers in TN.

Photo

FIS005-00021

A buffalo darter (Etheostoma bison) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center in Knoxville. This fish is common in its restricted range of the Upper and Buffalo Rivers in TN.

Photo

FIS005-00019

A cypress darter (Etheostoma proeliare) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center in Knoxville. This fish is common and widespread in the southeastern U.S.

Photo

FIS005-00018

A cypress darter (Etheostoma proeliare) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center in Knoxville. This fish is common and widespread in the southeastern U.S.

Photo

FIS005-00017

A swamp darter (Etheostoma fusiforme) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center in Knoxville. This fish is common and widespread in the southeastern U.S.

Photo

FIS005-00016

A swamp darter (Etheostoma fusiforme) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center in Knoxville. This fish is common and widespread in the southeastern U.S.

Photo

FIS014-00002

Mountain madtoms (Noturus eleutherus) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center in Knoxville. This fish is common and widespread in the southeastern U.S.

Photo

FIS014-00001

Mountain madtoms (Noturus eleutherus) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center in Knoxville. This fish is common and widespread in the southeastern U.S.

Photo

FIS005-00015

A channel darter (Percina copelandi) at Conservation Fisheries. This is a fairly common stream fish.

Photo

FIS005-00014

A channel darter (Percina copelandi) at Conservation Fisheries. This is a fairly common stream fish.

Photo

FIS005-00013

A channel darter (Percina copelandi) at Conservation Fisheries. This is a fairly common stream fish.

Photo

FIS005-00012

Rainbow darter (Etheostoma caeruleum) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center.

Photo

FIS005-00011

Rainbow darter (Etheostoma caeruleum) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center.

Photo

FIS005-00010

Rainbow darter (Etheostoma caeruleum) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center.

Photo

FIS005-00009

Rainbow darter (Etheostoma caeruleum) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center.

Photo

FIS013-00010

Whitetail shiner (Cyprinella galactura) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center. This is a common species of stream fish that’s being used for mussel propagation work.

Photo

FIS013-00009

Whitetail shiner (Cyprinella galactura) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center. This is a common species of stream fish that’s being used for mussel propagation work.

Photo

FIS013-00008

Whitetail shiner (Cyprinella galactura) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center. This is a common species of stream fish that’s being used for mussel propagation work.

Photo

FIS013-00007

Whitetail shiner (Cyprinella galactura) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center. This is a common species of stream fish that’s being used for mussel propagation work.

Photo

FIS013-00006

Whitetail shiner (Cyprinella galactura) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center. This is a common species of stream fish that’s being used for mussel propagation work.

Photo

FIS013-00005

Whitetail shiner (Cyprinella galactura) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center. This is a common species of stream fish that’s being used for mussel propagation work.

Photo

FIS013-00004

Whitetail shiner (Cyprinella galactura) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center. This is a common species of stream fish that’s being used for mussel propagation work.

Photo

FIS013-00003

Whitetail shiner (Cyprinella galactura) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center. This is a common species of stream fish that’s being used for mussel propagation work.

Photo

FIS013-00002

Whitetail shiner (Cyprinella galactura) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center. This is a common species of stream fish that’s being used for mussel propagation work.

Photo

FIS013-00001

Whitetail shiner (Cyprinella galactura) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center. This is a common species of stream fish that’s being used for mussel propagation work.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

Speaking Engagements

Joel is a popular keynote speaker with conservation, corporate, and civic groups.

Hire him to entertain and inspire your audience.

Book Joel To Speak

The Photo Ark

Joel is the founder of the Photo Ark, a groundbreaking effort to document every species in captivity before it’s too late.

Explore the Photo Ark

Visit Our Store

Every purchase goes directly to support our mission: getting the public to care and helping to save species from extinction.

Help Us Build the Ark