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A pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) crossing under a fence near Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada.

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A remote camera captures a leopard and a cape buffalo carcass.

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An infrared camera captures spotted hyenas on their dirt pad.

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An infrared camera captures a spotted hyena on its dirt pad.

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A lion feeds on a cow carcass in Queen Elizabeth National Park.

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An infrared remote camera captures a male lion near a hyena den.

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A pronghorn antelope, Antilocapra americana, crossing under a fence near Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada.

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A pronghorn antelope, Antilocapra americana, crossing under a fence near Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada.

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A pronghorn antelope sneaks under a barbed wire fence.

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A pronghorn antelope, Antilocapra americana, crawls under a fence.

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An Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) named Cila rests near the viewing window at the Indianapolis Zoo. Image was taken with a remote camera place inside the exhibit. Listed as endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered.

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At dusk, a hippo stares down a remote camera placed at a favorite water hole in Queen Elizabeth National Park, Uganda.

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An infrared camera trap captures hyenas near their den in the Queen Elizabeth National Park in Uganda.

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A lioness feeds on the remains of a cow inside Queen Elizabeth National Park in Uganda. As the human population grows in East Africa, more cattle are pushed into the park, leading to more lion kills–and more poisoning of the lions by cattlemen.

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Testing a camera trap on assignment in Brazil’s Pantanal.

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Joel Sartore checks the exposure setting on a camera trap in Brazil’s Pantanal.

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Local guides help position the components of a camera trap in Brazil’s Pantanal region.

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The US-Mexico border wall splits countries and habitat. Animals like this bobcat (Lynx rufus) or its cousin the ocelot, would normally cross the border to hunt or mate. Photograph by Joel Sartore with Mitch Sternberg, Jennifer Lowry, and Naghma Malik, all U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services.

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An eastern bluebird (Sialia sialis) near Pleasantdale, Nebraska.

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A male Baltimore oriole (Icterus galbula) in Raymond, Nebraska.

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A coyote (Canis latrans) walking along a barbed wire fence near Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada.

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A pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) crossing under a fence near Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada.

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A pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) crossing under a fence near Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada.

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An ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) photographed with a camera trap in Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge in Texas.

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A bobcat (Lynx rufus) traverses along the Mexican-Texas border. A border wall along the lower Rio Grande in Texas divides nations as well as habitats, hindering daily essential movements of animals in the area. Bobcats would normally cross the border to find mates or catch dinner. The wall also blocks the dailly rounds of ocelots, another member of the cat family. Photograph by Joel Sartore with Mitch Sternberg, Jennifer Lowry, and Naghma Malik, all U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

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Red-headed woodpeckers (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) feed their young high in the forest canopy at Spring Creek Prairie near Denton, Nebraska.

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Cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) flying into their mud nests under a county bridge near Raymond, Nebraska.

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An interior least tern (Sterna antillarum), a federally endangered species, on its nest at the Western Sand and Gravel mine along the Platte River near Fremont, NE. Many mine companies are pausing work during the nesting season in areas this bird and other rare species use.

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Cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) flying into their mud nests under a county bridge near Raymond, Nebraska.

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A bobcat (Lynx rufus) photographed by a camera trap along the Tex-Mex border wall. The border wall cuts through many places of the last habitat left along the lower Rio Grande river, the wall is a huge impediment to the movement of wildlife species that can’t fly over it.

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Red-headed woodpeckers (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) feed their young high in the forest canopy at Spring Creek Prairie near Denton, Nebraska.

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A bobcat (Lynx rufus) photographed by a camera trap along the Texas-Mexico border in Texas. Cutting in many places through the last of the habitat left along the lower Rio Grande river, the wall is a huge impediment to the movement of wildlife species that can’t fly over it. Photograph by Joel Sartore with Mitch Sternberg, Jennifer Lowry, and Naghma Malik, all U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

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Red-headed woodpeckers (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) feed their young high in the forest canopy at Spring Creek Prairie near Denton, Nebraska.

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Red-headed woodpeckers (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) feed their young high in the forest canopy at Spring Creek Prairie near Denton, Nebraska.

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American goldfinch (Carduelis tristis) feed at Waveland Farm near Walton, Nebraska.

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American goldfinch (Carduelis tristis) feed at Waveland Farm near Walton, Nebraska.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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