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At the fishing village of Kyehoro, local boys now catch what few fish remain. This lake used to be famous for its massive Nile perch, but sizes and stocks have dwindled due to massive overfishing.

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At the fishing village of Kyehoro, the locals catch tiny carpenter fish for food for themselves, and to sell as animal feed. Here, a woman spreads fish on a dirt road to dry in the sun, and adds dirt to give the fish more weight when she sells them. This is the smallest fish (and last fish species) they can strain from Lake Albert; people turned to it after Nile perch populations dwindled due to overfishing.

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The Sunshine Coast Koala Rescue team pulls a female koala with conjunctivitis out of a tree in Kilcoy, Australia. She’ll be treated and released to a safe area once she’s healed.

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Galapagos mockingbird (Mimus parvulus) with a grasshopper in its mouth, on Rabida Island in the Galapagos.

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Galapagos mockingbird (Mimus parvulus) with a grasshopper in its mouth, on Rabida Island in the Galapagos.

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Two biologists catch snakes in the Ozarks of southern Missouri.

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Two biologists catch snakes in the Ozarks of southern Missouri.

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A ranch hand holds a dorado he has caught in the flooded forest on Barra Bansa ranch in Brazil.

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This tiny snail darter (Percina tanasi) stalled the construction of Tellico dam on the Little Tennessee river. Though the dam was built, the Endangered Species Act was henceforth seen in many quarters as an enemy of progress.

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A man, who owns a animal capture business called “Pesky Critter”, attempts to rope a stray pig after hurricane Andrew.

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Herpetologists look for central newts (Notophthalmus viridescens louisianensis) at a vernal pool in Bennett Springs State Park near Lebanon, Missouri.

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A fisherman in the Bighorn (Ram) Creek, part of the Kootenay River system in British Columbia, Canada.

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A lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) caught in a net by fishermen in Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho.

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A man proudly displays the fish he caught with his sister-in-law at Crosslake, Minnesota.

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A man gets a thumbs up from his sister-in-law as he proudly shows off his catch of fish at Crosslake, Minnesota.

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Kathy Sartore goes fishing with her brother-in-law, Paul Sartore.

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A man proudly holds up a northern pike (Esox lucius) he caught while fishing with his sister-in-law in Crosslake, Minnesota.

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A young boy fishing from a boat on a pond near Ceresco, Nebraska.

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A young boy fishing from a boat on a pond near Ceresco, Nebraska.

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A young boy fishing in a boat on a pond near Ceresco, Nebraska.

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A vulnerable (IUCN) male lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) that was caught in a walk-in trap to be radio collared. Lesser prairie-chicken numbers have declined drastically all through their limited range in the Southern Great Plains in recent years. Biologists fear that this species could be lost without habitat improvement such as the marking of fences that the birds often hit in flight, as well as the restriction of wind turbine farms that cause major disruption to the bird.

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A vulnerable (IUCN) male lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) that was caught in a walk-in trap to be radio collared. Lesser prairie-chicken numbers have declined drastically all through their limited range in the Southern Great Plains in recent years. Biologists fear that this species could be lost without habitat improvement such as the marking of fences that the birds often hit in flight, as well as the restriction of wind turbine farms that cause major disruption to the bird.

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A vulnerable (IUCN) male lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) that was caught in a walk-in trap to be radio collared. Lesser prairie-chicken numbers have declined drastically all through their limited range in the Southern Great Plains in recent years. Biologists fear that this species could be lost without habitat improvement such as the marking of fences that the birds often hit in flight, as well as the restriction of wind turbine farms that cause major disruption to the bird.

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A vulnerable (IUCN) male lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) that was caught in a walk-in trap to be radio collared. Lesser prairie-chicken numbers have declined drastically all through their limited range in the Southern Great Plains in recent years. Biologists fear that this species could be lost without habitat improvement such as the marking of fences that the birds often hit in flight, as well as the restriction of wind turbine farms that cause major disruption to the bird.

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A vulnerable (IUCN) male lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) that was caught in a walk-in trap to be radio collared. Lesser prairie-chicken numbers have declined drastically all through their limited range in the Southern Great Plains in recent years. Biologists fear that this species could be lost without habitat improvement such as the marking of fences that the birds often hit in flight, as well as the restriction of wind turbine farms that cause major disruption to the bird.

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A young girl fishes with her father near Tellico Dam in Lenoir City, Tennessee.

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A fish is suspended in the air during a fishing trip to Snyder pond near Bennet, Nebraska.

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A fish is suspended in the air during a fishing trip to Snyder pond near Bennet, Nebraska.

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A fish is suspended in the air during a fishing trip to Snyder pond near Bennet, Nebraska.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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