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An African sharptooth catfish (Clarias gariepinus) at Davao Crocodile Park.

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An African sharptooth catfish (Clarias gariepinus) at Davao Crocodile Park.

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An African sharptooth catfish (Clarias gariepinus) at Davao Crocodile Park.

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An African sharptooth catfish (Clarias gariepinus) at Davao Crocodile Park.

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A Catfish (Clarias batrachus) at the University of the Philippines.

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A Catfish (Clarias batrachus) at the University of the Philippines.

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A Catfish (Clarias batrachus) at the University of the Philippines.

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African sharptooth catfish (Clarias gariepinus) at Davao Crocodile Park. This species can ‘walk’ considerable distances to get to better water sources when their body of water dries up.

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Mexican blindcat (Prietella phreatophila) at the Conservation Department of the San Antonio Zoo.
This species is endangered on the IUCN Red List as well as on the US Federal list.

This stygobitic catfish is known from about a dozen sites in Coahuila, Mexico and is listed as endangered in both Mexico and the United States. A single population (represented by this individual) was recently discovered in Val Verde County, Texas, after two decades of searching by cave biologists. The San Antonio Zoo Department of Conservation and Research (SAZ DOCR) maintains a captive colony of this species, including two individuals that have been in captivity for over twenty years. Members of the Blindcat Working Group (a multinational team of researchers) are exploring the geographic distribution and population genetics of this species using eDNA, Next Generation sequencing, and boots-on-the-ground field efforts.

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Mexican blindcat (Prietella phreatophila) at the Conservation Department of the San Antonio Zoo.
This species is endangered on the IUCN Red List as well as on the US Federal list.

This stygobitic catfish is known from about a dozen sites in Coahuila, Mexico and is listed as endangered in both Mexico and the United States. A single population (represented by this individual) was recently discovered in Val Verde County, Texas, after two decades of searching by cave biologists. The San Antonio Zoo Department of Conservation and Research (SAZ DOCR) maintains a captive colony of this species, including two individuals that have been in captivity for over twenty years. Members of the Blindcat Working Group (a multinational team of researchers) are exploring the geographic distribution and population genetics of this species using eDNA, Next Generation sequencing, and boots-on-the-ground field efforts.

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Pygmy catfish (Corydoras pygmaeus) from a private collection.

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Pygmy catfish (Corydoras pygmaeus) from a private collection.

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Sterba’s corydoras (Corydoras sterbai) from a private collection.

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Sterba’s corydoras (Corydoras sterbai) from a private collection.

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L260 Queen Arabesque plecostomus, Hypancistrus sp., from a private collection. Plecostumus have identification numbers because many of them are quite similar. L, standing for Loricariidae, followed by their number.

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L260 Queen Arabesque plecostomus, Hypancistrus sp., from a private collection. Plecostumus have identification numbers because many of them are quite similar. L, standing for Loricariidae, followed by their number.

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L134 Leopard frog plecostomus (Peckoltia compta) from a private collection. Pleco have identification numbers because many of them are so similar. L, standing for Loricariidae, followed by their number.

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L134 Leopard frog plecostomus (Peckoltia compta) from a private collection. Pleco have identification numbers because many of them are so similar. L, standing for Loricariidae, followed by their number.

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A whiptail cat (Hemiloricaria fallax) at the Dallas World Aquarium.

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A whiptail cat (Hemiloricaria fallax) at the Dallas World Aquarium.

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A spoon head catfish (Planiloricaria cryptodon) at the Dallas World Aquarium.

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A spoon head catfish (Planiloricaria cryptodon) at the Dallas World Aquarium.

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A spoon head catfish (Planiloricaria cryptodon) at the Dallas World Aquarium.

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A spoon head catfish (Planiloricaria cryptodon) at the Dallas World Aquarium.

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A duplicate cory (Corydoras duplicareus) at Dallas World Aquarium.

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A duplicate cory (Corydoras duplicareus) at Dallas World Aquarium.

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Sand’s cory (Corydoras davidsandsi) at Dallas World Aquarium.

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Sand’s cory (Corydoras davidsandsi) at Dallas World Aquarium.

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A skunk cory (Corydoras arcuatus) at the Dallas World Aquarium.

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A skunk cory (Corydoras arcuatus) at the Dallas World Aquarium.

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Pictus catfish (Pimelodus pictus) at the Oklahoma City Zoo.

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Pictus catfish (Pimelodus pictus) at the Oklahoma City Zoo.

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Pictus catfish (Pimelodus pictus) at the Oklahoma City Zoo.

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Bloch’s catfish (Pimelodus blochii) at the Oklahoma City Zoo.

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Bloch’s catfish (Pimelodus blochii) at the Oklahoma City Zoo.

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Agassiz’s catfish (Corydoras agassizi) at the Oklahoma City Zoo.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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