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Fauna Andina

A guina (Leopardus guigna tigriillo) whose name is Pikumche from Fauna Andina in Santiago, Chile. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN red list.

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A red-fronted coot (Fulica rufifrons) at the Buin Zoo.

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A red-fronted coot (Fulica rufifrons) at the Buin Zoo.

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A leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius) at the Buin Zoo.

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A South American fur seal (Arctocephalus australis) named Eddy at Buin Marino.

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A male guiña (Leopardus guigna guigna) from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile.

He has only three legs, having lost one in a trapper’s snare. He was brought here to be taken care of by the Chilean Wildlife Authority.

Despite the loss of his front leg, he moves around well and has a good life here at Fauna Andina, a wildlife conservation and research center in Chile. Their goal is to protect wildlife through study and, captive breeding and release back into the wild.

The guiña has the smallest distribution of any wild cat on the planet. This makes it very susceptible to being endangered.

The Fauna Andina conservation center near is the only known center that’s ever bred this species in captivity.

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A male guiña (Leopardus guigna guigna) from Fauna Andina in central-south Chile.

He has only three legs, having lost one in a trapper’s snare. He was brought here to be taken care of by the Chilean Wildlife Authority.

Despite the loss of his front leg, he moves around well and has a good life here at Fauna Andina, a wildlife conservation and research center in Chile. Their goal is to protect wildlife through study and, captive breeding and release back into the wild.

The guiña has the smallest distribution of any wild cat on the planet. This makes it very susceptible to being endangered.

The Fauna Andina conservation center near is the only known center that’s ever bred this species in captivity.

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A male guiña (Leopardus guigna guigna) from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile.

He has only three legs, having lost one in a trapper’s snare. He was brought here to be taken care of by the Chilean Wildlife Authority.

Despite the loss of his front leg, he moves around well and has a good life here at Fauna Andina, a wildlife conservation and research center in Chile. Their goal is to protect wildlife through study and, captive breeding and release back into the wild.

The guiña has the smallest distribution of any wild cat on the planet. This makes it very susceptible to being endangered.

The Fauna Andina conservation center near is the only known center that’s ever bred this species in captivity.

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A male guiña (Leopardus guigna guigna) from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile.

He has only three legs, having lost one in a trapper’s snare. He was brought here to be taken care of by the Chilean Wildlife Authority.

Despite the loss of his front leg, he moves around well and has a good life here at Fauna Andina, a wildlife conservation and research center in Chile. Their goal is to protect wildlife through study and, captive breeding and release back into the wild.

The guiña has the smallest distribution of any wild cat on the planet. This makes it very susceptible to being endangered.

The Fauna Andina conservation center near is the only known center that’s ever bred this species in captivity.

Photo

ANI100-00094

A male guiña (Leopardus guigna guigna) from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile.

He has only three legs, having lost one in a trapper’s snare. He was brought here to be taken care of by the Chilean Wildlife Authority.

Despite the loss of his front leg, he moves around well and has a good life here at Fauna Andina, a wildlife conservation and research center in Chile. Their goal is to protect wildlife through study and, captive breeding and release back into the wild.

The guiña has the smallest distribution of any wild cat on the planet. This makes it very susceptible to being endangered.

The Fauna Andina conservation center near is the only known center that’s ever bred this species in captivity.

Photo

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A male guiña (Leopardus guigna guigna) from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile.

He has only three legs, having lost one in a trapper’s snare. He was brought here to be taken care of by the Chilean Wildlife Authority.

Despite the loss of his front leg, he moves around well and has a good life here at Fauna Andina, a wildlife conservation and research center in Chile. Their goal is to protect wildlife through study and, captive breeding and release back into the wild.

The guiña has the smallest distribution of any wild cat on the planet. This makes it very susceptible to being endangered.

The Fauna Andina conservation center near is the only known center that’s ever bred this species in captivity.

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A guiña (Leopardus guigna tigrillo) whose name is Pikumche from Fauna Andinain central-south, Chile. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN red list.

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A guiña (Leopardus guigna tigrillo) whose name is Pikumche from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN red list.

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A guiña (Leopardus guigna tigrillo) whose name is Pikumche from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN red list.

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A guiña (Leopardus guigna tigrillo) whose name is Pikumche from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN red list.

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A guiña (Leopardus guigna tigrillo) whose name is Pikumche from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN red list.

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A guina (Leopardus guigna tigrillo) whose name is Pikumche from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN red list.

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Vicunas in the high Andes near the Chile/Bolivia border in the Atacama Desert.

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A cat gets some attention while standing on the stone corral that protects an Aymara woman’s herd of sheep in Chile’s Atacama desert.

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A dust devil springs up near the Pan-American Highway in Chile’s Atacama Desert.

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A cat gets some attention while standing on the stone corral that protects an Aymara woman’s herd of sheep in Chile’s Atacama desert.

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A cat gets some attention while standing on the stone corral that protects an Aymara woman’s herd of sheep in Chile’s Atacama desert.

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A dust devil springs up near the Pan-American Highway in Chile’s Atacama Desert.

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A dust devil springs up near the Pan-American Highway in Chile’s Atacama Desert.

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A dust devil springs up near the Pan-American Highway in Chile’s Atacama Desert.

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A Humboldt penguin on a nest on the Pacific coast of Chile, near Antofagasta.

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Humboldt penguins on the Pacific coast of Chile, near Antofagasta.

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Scenics on the Pacific coast of Chile, near Antofagasta, showing sea stacks.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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