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A federally endangered Ozark hellbender (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis bishopi), infected with chytrid fungus, at the St. Louis Zoo, St. Louis, Missouri. (IUCN: Near Threatened)

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A federally endangered Ozark hellbender (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis bishopi), infected with chytrid fungus, at the St. Louis Zoo, St. Louis, Missouri. (IUCN: Near Threatened)

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An extinct splendid poison frog (Oophaga speciosa) preserved in alcohol at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Gamboa, Panama.

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Extinct Chiriqui harlequin frogs (Atelopus chiriquiensis) preserved in alcohol at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Gamboa, Panama.

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Two extinct frog species, a Chiriqui harlequin frog (Atelopus chiriquiensis) and a splendid poison frog (Oophaga speciosa) at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Gamboa, Panama.

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A stubfoot toad (Atelopus limon) infected with chytrid fungus at a lab in Quito, Ecuador. (IUCN: Critically Endangered)

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ANI078-00332

A stubfoot toad (Atelopus limon), infected with chytrid fungus, at a lab in Quito, Ecuador. (IUCN: Critically Endangered)

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ANI078-00252

A critically endangered stubfoot toad (Atelopus limon), infected with chytrid fungus, at a lab in Quito, Ecuador.

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SCE049-00019

A scientist swabs a Mount Lyell salamander (Hydromantes platycephalus) to test for chytrid fungus in the Sixty Lake Basin of King’s Canyon National Park, Nevada.

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A scientist swabs a Mount Lyell salamander (Hydromantes platycephalus) to test for chytrid fungus in the Sixty Lake Basin of King’s Canyon National Park, Nevada.

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A male harlequin frog (Atelopus sp.) is swabbed for chytrid fungus at a research site near Limon, Ecuador.

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After being examined for chytrid fungus, a male harlequin frog (Atelopus sp.) is shown to members of the press at a research site near Limon, Ecuador.

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A researcher holds a male harlequin frog (Atelopus sp.) collected for captive breeding near Limon, Ecuador.

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A harlequin frog (Atelopus sp.) is swabbed for study at a research site near Limon, Ecuador.

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Joel Sartore with a long-snouted robber frog (Pristimantis appendiculatus) in the cloud forest reserve near Mindo, Ecuador.

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Recently killed introduced trout in the Sixty Lake Basin of King’s Canyon National Park, Nevada.

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A harlequin frog (Atelopus sp.) photographed in Ecuador.

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ANI076-00019

Chytrid fungus has swept through Kings Canyon National Park with a vengance. This is one of the last southern moutain yellow-legged frogs (Rana muscosa) in the area. The disease first appeared in this High Sierra basin in 2004, and has virtually wiped out the last stronghold metapopulations of this species. “Worldwide, this is the worst case of a disease causing extinctions in recorded history, and we’re seeing the results of it right here,” said Vance Vredenburg, an amphibian ecologist who has studied the basin for 13 years. (IUCN: EN, US: EN)

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A live male harlequin frog (Atelopus sp.) in amplexus with a female, dead from chytrid fungus, near Limon, Ecuador. The male died a few days later of the same disease. This species is critically endangered and headed toward extinction due to habitat loss and disease, including chytrid fungus.

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ANI076-00001

In King’s Canyon National Park, California, chytrid fungus has swept through with a vengeance. Shown are some of the last southern moutain yellow-legged frogs (Rana muscosa) as they lay dead from the fungus. The disease first appeared in this High Sierra basin in 2004, and has virtually wiped out the last stronghold metapopulations of this species. Where once tens of thousands lived, now fewer than 100 remain. “Worldwide, this is the worst case of a disease causing extinctions in recorded history, and we’re seeing the results of it right here,” said Vance Vredenburg, an amphibian ecologist who has studied the basin for 13 years.

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Imitating or mimic poison dart frog (Ranitameya imitator) at the Baltimore Aquarium. This animal is a descendant of the few remaining animals in El Cope National Park in Panama, where the chytrid fungus may wipe out the animal at any time.

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Imitating or mimic poison dart frog (Ranitameya imitator) at the Baltimore Aquarium. This animal is a descendant of the few remaining animals in El Cope National Park in Panama, where the chytrid fungus may wipe out the animal at any time.

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ANI068-00286

Imitating or mimic poison dart frog (Ranitameya imitator) at the Baltimore Aquarium. This animal is a descendant of the few remaining animals in El Cope National Park in Panama, where the chytrid fungus may wipe out the animal at any time.

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Imitating or mimic poison dart frog (Ranitameya imitator) at the Baltimore Aquarium. This animal is a descendant of the few remaining animals in El Cope National Park in Panama, where the chytrid fungus may wipe out the animal at any time.

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ANI068-00284

Imitating or mimic poison dart frog (Ranitameya imitator) at the Baltimore Aquarium. This animal is a descendant of the few remaining animals in El Cope National Park in Panama, where the chytrid fungus may wipe out the animal at any time.

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ANI068-00283

Imitating or mimic poison dart frog (Ranitameya imitator) at the Baltimore Aquarium. This animal is a descendant of the few remaining animals in El Cope National Park in Panama, where the chytrid fungus may wipe out the animal at any time.

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Imitating or mimic poison dart frog (Ranitameya imitator) at the Baltimore Aquarium. This animal is a descendant of the few remaining animals in El Cope National Park in Panama, where the chytrid fungus may wipe out the animal at any time.

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ANI068-00281

Imitating or mimic poison dart frog (Ranitameya imitator) at the Baltimore Aquarium. This animal is a descendant of the few remaining animals in El Cope National Park in Panama, where the chytrid fungus may wipe out the animal at any time.

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Imitating or mimic poison dart frog (Ranitameya imitator) at the Baltimore Aquarium. This animal is a descendant of the few remaining animals in El Cope National Park in Panama, where the chytrid fungus may wipe out the animal at any time.

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ANI068-00279

Imitating or mimic poison dart frog (Ranitameya imitator) at the Baltimore Aquarium. This animal is a descendant of the few remaining animals in El Cope National Park in Panama, where the chytrid fungus may wipe out the animal at any time.

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ANI068-00278

Imitating or mimic poison dart frog (Ranitameya imitator) at the Baltimore Aquarium. This animal is a descendant of the few remaining animals in El Cope National Park in Panama, where the chytrid fungus may wipe out the animal at any time.

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ANI068-00277

Imitating or mimic poison dart frog (Ranitameya imitator) at the Baltimore Aquarium. This animal is a descendant of the few remaining animals in El Cope National Park in Panama, where the chytrid fungus may wipe out the animal at any time.

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ANI068-00273

An El Cope morph of the green and black poison dart frog (Dendrobates auratus) at the Baltimore Aquarium. This animal is a descendant of the few remaining animals in El Cope National Park in Panama, where the chytrid fungus may wipe out the animal at any time.

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ANI068-00272

An El Cope morph of the green and black poison dart frog (Dendrobates auratus) at the Baltimore Aquarium. This animal is a descendant of the few remaining animals in El Cope National Park in Panama, where the chytrid fungus may wipe out the animal at any time.

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ANI068-00271

An El Cope morph of the green and black poison dart frog (Dendrobates auratus) at the Baltimore Aquarium. This animal is a descendant of the few remaining animals in El Cope National Park in Panama, where the chytrid fungus may wipe out the animal at any time.

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ANI068-00270

An El Cope morph of the green and black poison dart frog (Dendrobates auratus) at the Baltimore Aquarium. This animal is a descendant of the few remaining animals in El Cope National Park in Panama, where the chytrid fungus may wipe out the animal at any time.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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