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ONA007-00144

Mussel biologist Steve Ahlstedt shows off coal fines, the sediments from Virginia’s coal mines that wash into the rivers of Tennessee. It is thought that coal fines and the use of heavy industrial chemicals to clean coal in Viriginia are both major factors in the disappearance of rare Mussels in the Clinch and Powell Rivers, two of the last places where many rare mussels were found.

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ESA002-00355

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered oyster mussels (Epioblasma capsaeformis). These mussels and many others are in danger of extinction because of habitat loss due to impoundments and pollution. Pollution from coal mining in the Clinch River watershed is of special concern. The fine sedimentation that comes downstream from the mines is thought to impede mussel survival.

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ESA002-00356

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens). It has lures that look like fish eggs on top that are used to attract fish. When a fish strikes at the lures, the mussels then eject their larvae into the fish’s gills and are able to increase their distribution, even upstream. The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA002-00358

Endangered mussels extend their feet to move around. All are from the Clinch River in eastern TN. More endangered aquatic animals are found here than anywhere else in North America.

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ESA002-00359

Endangered mussels extend their feet to move around. All are from the Clinch River in eastern TN. More endangered aquatic animals are found here than anywhere else in North America.

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ESA002-00349

A federally endangered fine-rayed pigtoe (Fusconaia cuneolus) taken from the Clinch River near Sneedville. The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA002-00350

A federally endangered fine-rayed pigtoe (Fusconaia cuneolus) taken from the Clinch River near Sneedville. The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA002-00351

A federally endangered fine-rayed pigtoe (Fusconaia cuneolus) taken from the Clinch River near Sneedville. The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA002-00353

A critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered oyster mussel (Epioblasma capsaeformis). These mussels and many others are in danger of extinction because of habitat loss due to such as impoundments and pollution. Pollution from coal mining in the Clinch River watershed is of special concern. The fine sedimentation that comes downstream from the mines is thought to impede mussel survival.

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ESA002-00354

A critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered oyster mussel (Epioblasma capsaeformis) displaying its blue-white mantle. These mussels and many others are in danger of extinction because of habitat loss due to impoundments and pollution. Pollution from coal mining in the Clinch River watershed is of special concern. The fine sedimentation that comes downstream from the mines is thought to impede mussel survival.

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ESA002-00345

A critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered oyster mussel (Epioblasma capsaeformis) displaying its blue-white mantle. These mussels and many others are in danger of extinction because of habitat loss due to such as impoundments and pollution. Pollution from coal mining in the Clinch River watershed is of special concern. The fine sedimentation that comes downstream from the mines is thought to impede mussel survival.

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ESA002-00346

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens). It has lures that look like fish eggs on top that are used to attract fish. When a fish strikes at the lures, the mussels then eject their larvae into the fish’s gills and are able to increase their distribution, even upstream. The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet it is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA002-00344

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens) taken from the Clinch River near Sneedville. They have ball lures on top that are used to attract fish to come near. When a fish strikes at the lures, the freshwater mussels then eject their larvae into the fish’s gills and are able to increase their distribution.

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ESA001-00309

Federally listed endangered freshwater mussels taken from the Clinch River near Sneedville. Shown is a finerayed pigtoe (Fusconaia cuneolus).The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA001-00310

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens). It has lures that look like fish eggs on top that are used to attract fish. When a fish strikes at the lures, the mussels then eject their larvae into the fish’s gills and are able to increase their distribution, even upstream. The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA001-00312

Endangered mussels extend their feet to move around. All are from the Clinch River in eastern TN. More endangered aquatic animals are found here than anywhere else in North America.

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ESA001-00297

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens) taken from the Clinch River near Sneedville. These mussels and many others are in danger of extinction due to habitat loss due such as impoundments and pollution. Pollution from coal mining in the Clinch River watershed is of special concern. The fine sedimentation that comes downstream from the mines is thought to impede mussel survival.

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ESA001-00298

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens) taken from the Clinch River near Sneedville. These mussels and many others are in danger of extinction due to habitat loss due such as impoundments and pollution. Pollution from coal mining in the Clinch River watershed is of special concern. The fine sedimentation that comes downstream from the mines is thought to impede mussel survival.

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ESA001-00299

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens). It has lures that look like fish eggs on top that are used to attract fish. When a fish strikes at the lures, the mussels then eject their larvae into the fish’s gills and are able to increase their distribution, even upstream. The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA001-00300

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens). It has lures that look like fish eggs on top that are used to attract fish. When a fish strikes at the lures, the mussels then eject their larvae into the fish’s gills and are able to increase their distribution, even upstream. The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA001-00301

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens). It has lures that look like fish eggs on top that are used to attract fish. When a fish strikes at the lures, the mussels then eject their larvae into the fish’s gills and are able to increase their distribution, even upstream. The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA001-00302

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens). It has lures that look like fish eggs on top that are used to attract fish. When a fish strikes at the lures, the mussels then eject their larvae into the fish’s gills and are able to increase their distribution, even upstream. The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA001-00303

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens). It has lures that look like fish eggs on top that are used to attract fish. When a fish strikes at the lures, the mussels then eject their larvae into the fish’s gills and are able to increase their distribution, even upstream. The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA001-00288

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens) taken from the Clinch River near Sneedville. They have ball lures on top that are used to attract fish to come near. When a fish strikes at the lures, the freshwater mussels then eject their larvae into the fish’s gills and are able to increase their distribution that way.

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ESA001-00304

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens). It has lures that look like fish eggs on top that are used to attract fish. When a fish strikes at the lures, the mussels then eject their larvae into the fish’s gills and are able to increase their distribution, even upstream. The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA001-00289

A federally endangered fanshell (Cyprogenia stegaria) taken from the Clinch River near Sneedville.

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ESA001-00305

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens). It has lures that look like fish eggs on top that are used to attract fish. When a fish strikes at the lures, the mussels then eject their larvae into the fish’s gills and are able to increase their distribution, even upstream. The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA001-00290

A federally endangered fanshell (Cyprogenia stegaria) taken from the Clinch River near Sneedville.

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ESA001-00306

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens). It has lures that look like fish eggs on top that are used to attract fish. When a fish strikes at the lures, the mussels then eject their larvae into the fish’s gills and are able to increase their distribution, even upstream. The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA001-00291

A critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered rough pigtoe (Pleurobema plenum) taken from the Clinch River near Sneedville.

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ESA001-00307

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally listed endangered freshwater mussels taken from the Clinch River near Sneedville. Shown is the oyster mussel (Epioblasma capsaeformis) displaying its blue-white mantle.The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA001-00292

A critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered rough pigtoe (Pleurobema plenum) taken from the Clinch River near Sneedville.

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ESA001-00308

A critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered rough pigtoe (Pleurobema plenum) taken from the Clinch River near Sneedville. Shown is the rough pigtoe (Pleurobema plenum). The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA001-00293

A federally endangered cracking pearly mussel (Hemistena lata) taken from the Clinch River near Sneedville.

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ESA001-00294

A critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered oyster mussel (Epioblasma capsaeformis) displaying its blue-white mantle. These mussels and many others are in danger of extinction due to habitat loss due such as impoundments and pollution. Pollution from coal mining in the Clinch River watershed is of special concern. The fine sedimentation that comes downstream from the mines is thought to impede mussel survival.

Photo

ESA001-00295

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens) taken from the Clinch River near Sneedville. These mussels and many others are in danger of extinction due to habitat loss due such as impoundments and pollution. Pollution from coal mining in the Clinch River watershed is of special concern. The fine sedimentation that comes downstream from the mines is thought to impede mussel survival.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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