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ANI074-00122

Cave dwelling snake (Elaphe taeniura ridleyi) at the Omaha Zoo.

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ANI077-00246

Armstrong’s Dusky Rattlesnake (Crotalus armstrongi) at the Houston Zoo.

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ANI077-00243

Gray-banded kingsnake (Lampropeltis alterna) at the Fort Worth Zoo.

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ANI074-00111

A federally threatened New Mexico ridge-nosed rattlesnake, Crotalus willardi obscurus, at the Arizona Sonora Desert Museum.

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ANI074-00106

Eastern indigo snake, Drymarchon corais couperi, at the Toledo Zoo. This species is federally threatened.

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ANI082-00166

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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ANI082-00024

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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ANI082-00025

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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ANI082-00026

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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ANI082-00027

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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ANI082-00028

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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ANI082-00029

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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ANI082-00030

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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ANI082-00031

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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ANI077-00221

A garter snake (Thamnophis sp.) near the Steamboat Trace trail between Nebraska City and Peru, Nebraska.

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ANI077-00220

A garter snake (Thamnophis sp.) near the Steamboat Trace trail between Nebraska City and Peru, Nebraska.

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ANI077-00120

A Tuxtlan jumping pitviper or Olmecan pitviper (Atropoides olmec) at the Chapultepec Zoo, Mexico City, Mexico.

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ANI077-00088

A Venezuelan or Colombian rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus cumanensis) with juvenile of same species at the Buffalo Zoo, Buffalo, New York.

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ANI077-00089

A corn snake (Elaphe gutatta) at the Lincoln Children’s Zoo, Lincoln, Nebraska.

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ANI077-00081

A Venezuelan or Colombian rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus cumanensis) at the Buffalo Zoo, Buffalo, New York.

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ANI077-00082

A Venezuelan or Colombian rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus cumanensis) with juvenile of same species at the Buffalo Zoo, Buffalo, New York.

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ANI077-00083

A Venezuelan or Colombian rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus cumanensis) at the Buffalo Zoo, Buffalo, New York.

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ANI077-00084

A Venezuelan or Colombian rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus cumanensis) at the Buffalo Zoo, Buffalo, New York.

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ANI077-00085

A Venezuelan or Colombian rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus cumanensis) at the Buffalo Zoo, Buffalo, New York.

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ANI077-00087

A Venezuelan or Colombian rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus cumanensis) at the Buffalo Zoo, Buffalo, New York.

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ANI074-00061

Prairie kingsnake (Lampropeltis calligaster calligaster) collected in Pawnee County, Nebraska.

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ANI074-00065

Northern Plains ratsnake (Pantherophis emoryi) collected in Thayer County, Nebraska.

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ANI074-00058

Prairie kingsnake (Lampropeltis calligaster calligaster) collected in Pawnee County, Nebraska.

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ANI074-00055

Prairie kingsnake (Lampropeltis calligaster calligaster) collected in Pawnee County, Nebraska.

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ANI074-00056

Prairie kingsnake (Lampropeltis calligaster calligaster) collected in Pawnee County, Nebraska.

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ANI074-00057

Prairie kingsnake (Lampropeltis calligaster calligaster) collected in Pawnee County, Nebraska.

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ANI074-00046

Central Plains milk snake (Lampropeltis triangulum gentilis) collected in Jefferson County, Nebraska.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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