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A chocolate phased Dominican red mountian boa (Chilabothrus striatus striatus) from a private collection.

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A Mexican burrowing python (Loxocemus bicolor) at the Sedgwick County Zoo in Wichita, Kansas.

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Broad-banded watersnake (Nerodia fasciata confluens) a subspecies of the southern watersnake at the Houston Zoo.

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A Calabar python (Calabaria reinhardtii) at the Columbus Zoo.

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A children’s python (Antaresia childreni) at the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans.

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A children’s python (Antaresia childreni) at the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans.

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A children’s python (Antaresia childreni) at the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans.

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Cave dwelling snake (Elaphe taeniura ridleyi) at the Omaha Zoo.

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Armstrong’s Dusky Rattlesnake (Crotalus armstrongi) at the Houston Zoo.

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A federally threatened New Mexico ridge-nosed rattlesnake, Crotalus willardi obscurus, at the Arizona Sonora Desert Museum.

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Eastern indigo snake, Drymarchon couperi, at the Toledo Zoo. This species is federally threatened.

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A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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A garter snake (Thamnophis sp.) near the Steamboat Trace trail between Nebraska City and Peru, Nebraska.

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A garter snake (Thamnophis sp.) near the Steamboat Trace trail between Nebraska City and Peru, Nebraska.

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A garter snake (Thamnophis sp.) near the Steamboat Trace trail between Nebraska City and Peru, Nebraska.

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A garter snake (Thamnophis sp.) near the Steamboat Trace trail between Nebraska City and Peru, Nebraska.

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A Tuxtlan jumping pitviper or Olmecan pitviper (Atropoides olmec) at the Chapultepec Zoo, Mexico City, Mexico.

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Mexican lance-headed rattlesnakes (Crotalus polystictus) at the St. Louis Zoo.

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Two Rowley’s palm pit vipers (Bothriechis rowleyi) at the St. Louis Zoo, St. Louis, Missouri.

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A Venezuelan or Colombian rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus cumanensis) with juvenile of same species at the Buffalo Zoo, Buffalo, New York.

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A corn snake (Elaphe gutatta) at the Lincoln Children’s Zoo, Lincoln, Nebraska.

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An emerald tree boa (Corallus caninus) at the Buffalo Zoo, Buffalo, New York.

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A Venezuelan or Colombian rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus cumanensis) at the Buffalo Zoo, Buffalo, New York.

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A Venezuelan or Colombian rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus cumanensis) with juvenile of same species at the Buffalo Zoo, Buffalo, New York.

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A Venezuelan or Colombian rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus cumanensis) at the Buffalo Zoo, Buffalo, New York.

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A Venezuelan or Colombian rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus cumanensis) at the Buffalo Zoo, Buffalo, New York.

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A Venezuelan or Colombian rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus cumanensis) at the Buffalo Zoo, Buffalo, New York.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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