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Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Chincua Mountain near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle–Already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

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Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Chincua Mountain near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle–Already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

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Monarchs (Danaus plexippus) in the Sierra Chincua sanctuary, Mexico.

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Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

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Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

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Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

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Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

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Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

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Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

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Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

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Joel Sartore on assignment at Sierra Chincua in Mexico, home to the world’s largest gathering of monarch butterflies.

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Logging has taken its toll on a former wintering roost for monarch butterflies near Angangueo, Mexico.

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Logging has taken its toll on a former wintering roost for monarch butterflies near Angangueo, Mexico.

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Logging has taken its toll on a former wintering roost for monarch butterflies near Angangueo, Mexico.

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Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

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Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

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Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

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A brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) waits in a holding pen at the rehab center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. This is where most of the oiled birds were brought in from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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An aerial of heavily oiled marshlands surrounded by oil booms in Barataria Bay, Louisiana.

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A crew of BP contractors attempt to siphon oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill out of a marsh in the Gulf of Mexico.

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Portrait of a dead sea turtle, covered in oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

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Massive amounts of oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill ring the outer edges of a marsh near the mouth of the Mississippi river in Louisiana.

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Crude oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill coats marshes on a barrier island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. Once oiled this heavily, marsh grasses will die.

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Crude oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill coats marshes on a barrier island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. Once oiled this heavily, marsh grasses will die.

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An oiled white ibis (Eudocimus albus) lifts off from a rookery on a barrier island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana.

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A clean up crew hired by BP tries to sop oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, along the shoreline on Queen Bess island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana.

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A brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis), covered with oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, on Queen Bess Island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. The bird was taken to a rehab center.

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A brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis), covered with oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, on Queen Bess Island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. The bird was taken to a rehab center.

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A brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis), covered with oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, on Queen Bess Island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. The bird was taken to a rehab center.

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A brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis), covered with oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, on Queen Bess Island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. The bird was taken to a rehab center.

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A brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis), covered with oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, on Queen Bess Island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. The bird was taken to a rehab center.

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A brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis), covered with oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, on Queen Bess Island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. The bird was taken to a rehab center.

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A man holds a brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) covered with oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, on Queen Bess Island, Louisiana.

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A brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis), covered with oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, on Queen Bess Island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. The bird was taken to a rehab center.

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A pelican, covered in oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, lies dead on a beach at East Grande Terre, Louisiana.

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A BP clean up crew tries to sop oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill at Queen Bess Island, Louisiana.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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