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ENV021-00081

On board a PHI helicopter/media flight covering the deep water horizon oil spill at the spill site, two types of burning are now going on. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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ENV021-00082

On board a PHI helicopter/media flight covering the deep water horizon oil spill at the spill site, two types of burning are now going on. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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ENV021-00083

On board a PHI helicopter/media flight covering the deep water horizon oil spill at the spill site, two types of burning are now going on. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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ENV021-00011

A clean up crew hired by BP tries to sop oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, along the shoreline on Queen Bess island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana.

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ENV021-00050

This aerial shows two types of burn-offs used on the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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ENV021-00051

This aerial shows two types of burn-offs used on the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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ENV021-00032

A former shrimping boat now trawls for oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in Barataria Bay, Louisiana.

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ENV021-00033

Crude oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill coats marshes on a barrier island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. Once oiled this heavily, marsh grasses will die.

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ENV021-00034

Crude oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill coats marshes on a barrier island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. Once oiled this heavily, marsh grasses will die.

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ENV021-00035

An underwater view of surface oil in Barataria Bay, Louisiana, from the Deepwater Horizon spill.

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ENV021-00036

An underwater view of surface oil in Barataria Bay, Louisiana, from the Deepwater Horizon spill.

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ENV021-00027

Oil booms were deployed to defend Cat Island, Louisiana (an important bird rookery) from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. They proved largely ineffective.

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ENV021-00028

Portrait of a dead sea turtle, covered in oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

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ENV021-00030

Massive amounts of oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill ring the outer edges of a marsh near the mouth of the Mississippi river in Louisiana.

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ENV021-00031

Oil booms deployed to protect the bird rookery at Cat Island, Louisiana, from the Deepwater Horizon spill proved largely ineffective.

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ENV021-00015

A brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis), covered with oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, on Queen Bess Island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. The bird was taken to a rehab center.

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ENV021-00016

A brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis), covered with oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, on Queen Bess Island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. The bird was taken to a rehab center.

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ENV021-00017

A brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis), covered with oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, on Queen Bess Island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. The bird was taken to a rehab center.

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ENV021-00018

A brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis), covered with oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, on Queen Bess Island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. The bird was taken to a rehab center.

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ENV021-00019

A brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis), covered with oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, on Queen Bess Island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. The bird was taken to a rehab center.

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ENV021-00020

A man holds a brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) covered with oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, on Queen Bess Island, Louisiana.

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ENV021-00021

A brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis), covered with oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, on Queen Bess Island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. The bird was taken to a rehab center.

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ENV021-00022

Brown pelicans (Pelecanus occidentalis) and their chicks, covered with oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, on Cat island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana.

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ENV021-00023

A dead bait fish in a gloved hand covered with crude oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. This fish was found on the top of a thick oil slick.

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ENV021-00024

A dead bait fish in a gloved hand covered with crude oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. This fish was found on the top of a thick oil slick.

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ENV021-00008

A boat pulls booms over the water in Barataria Bay, Louisiana, cleaning up oil from the Deepwater Horizon Spill.

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ENV021-00025

A thick oil slick, from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, covers the water in Barataria Bay, Louisiana.

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ENV021-00009

Crude oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill washed ashore on Queen Bess Island, Louisiana in Barataria Bay.

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ENV021-00026

A pelican, covered in oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, lies dead on a beach at East Grande Terre, Louisiana.

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ENV021-00010

Joel Sartore, on assignment for National Geographic magazine, while photographing the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in Barataria Bay, Louisiana.

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ENV021-00012

A clean up crew hired by BP tries to sop oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, along the shoreline on Queen Bess island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana.

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ENV021-00014

A brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis), covered with oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, on Queen Bess Island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. The bird was taken to a rehab center.

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ENV021-00003

A failed boom lies washed up in a marsh, showing the effects of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

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ENV021-00006

A dead sea turtle floating in an oil slick from the Deepwater Horizon spill, in Barataria Bay, Louisiana.

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ENV021-00007

A BP clean up crew tries to sop oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill at Queen Bess Island, Louisiana.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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