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The living room of a native American family in the Pacific Northwest shows images of past and present realities of this salmon-centered culture.

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This tiny snail darter (Percina tanasi) stalled the construction of Tellico dam on the Little Tennessee river. Though the dam was built, the Endangered Species Act was henceforth seen in many quarters as an enemy of progress.

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Hungry Horse Dam, one of the biggest dams that blocks bull trout movements in Northern Montana. Note that biologists say this dam actually prevents non-native fish from moving upstream here, which today is a good thing. No fish ladder or passages were incorporated into this or any other dam in this region at the time they were built.

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The Thompson Falls dam, which is currently starting construction to build a fish passage system on the Clark Fork river in Thompson Falls, Montana. Shown is the road way being constructed on the downstream side that will be used to transport heavy machinery.

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A fisheries technician for dam owner Avista, uses a radio antenna to track tagged bull trout in a stream that feeds into Noxon Reservoir. Biologists track a handful of tagged fish daily to try and learn about their migratory movements, which a series of dams on the nearby Clark Fork River have severely impeded.

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A fisheries technician for Avista, checks a monitoring station for radio-tagged bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) at the base of Noxon Rapids Dam, Montana. (US: Federally threatened; IUCN: Vulnerable)

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Two young girls chat after practicing soccer atop Holmes Lake Dam in Lincoln, NE.

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Two young girls chat after practicing soccer atop Holmes Lake Dam in Lincoln, NE.

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Two young girls practice their soccer skills atop Holmes Lake Dam in Lincoln, NE.

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Two young girls practice their soccer skills atop Holmes Lake Dam in Lincoln, NE.

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A young girl fishes with her father near Tellico Dam in Lenoir City, Tennessee.

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A hydroelectric dam’s giant propeller undergoes repairs along the Pacific Northwest’s Columbia River.

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The Bonneville Dam’s fish collection facility. Salmon are sorted from the Columbia River and worked here by biologists.

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Hydroelectric dams like the Bonneville on the Columbia River cause problems for salmon.

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A Native American catches squawfish at the McNary Dam. A government program allows them to continue fishing for squawfish, a traditional practice.

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Because it threatened the endangered snail darter’s habitat, construction of the Telico Dam (TN) was held up under the Endangered Species Act.

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Because it threatened the endangered snail darter’s habitat, construction of the Telico Dam (TN) was held up under the Endangered Species Act.

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Because it threatened the endangered snail darter’s habitat, construction of the Telico Dam (TN) was held up under the Endangered Species Act.

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Because it threatened the endangered snail darter’s habitat, construction of the Telico Dam (TN) was held up under the Endangered Species Act.

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To move salmon from hatcheries past dams on the Columbia River, the US Army Corps of Engineers has developed an elaborate system of piping and barging the fish out to sea.

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A “fish ladder,” designed to move salmon smolts past dams on the Columbia River and out to sea.

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A “fish ladder,” designed to move salmon smolts past dams on the Columbia River and out to sea.

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A salmon counter at the Bonneville Dam tracks the species as it moves through the Columbia River system.

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A salmon counter at the Bonneville Dam tracks the species as it moves through the Columbia River system.

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A salmon counter at the Bonneville Dam tracks the species as it moves through the Columbia River system.

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A salmon counter at the Bonneville Dam tracks the species as it moves through the Columbia River system.

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A “fish ladder,” designed to move salmon smolts past dams on the Columbia River and out to sea.

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To move salmon from hatcheries past dams on the Columbia River, the US Army Corps of Engineers has developed an elaborate system of piping and barging the fish out to sea.

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To move salmon from hatcheries past dams on the Columbia River, the US Army Corps of Engineers has developed an elaborate system of piping and barging the fish out to sea.

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The US Army Corps of Engineers developed an elaborate system of barging to move salmon smolts past the hydroelectric dams of the Columbia River and out to sea.

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To move salmon from hatcheries past dams on the Columbia River, the US Army Corps of Engineers has developed an elaborate system of piping and barging the fish out to sea.

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A salmon counter at the Bonneville Dam tracks the species as it moves through the Columbia River system.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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