Photo

ANI111-00026

Southern hognose snakes (Heterodon simus) in red and white color phases, at a private collection.

These individuals are “playing dead”, a common defense tactic for this species as some predators don’t want to touch something that’s sick, dying or dead.

This species is listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.

Photo

ANI111-00025

A southern hognose snake (Heterodon simus) in red and white color phases, at a private collection.

This individual is “playing dead”, a common defense tactic for this species as some predators don’t want to touch something that’s sick, dying or dead.

This species is listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.

Photo

ANI111-00024

Southern hognose snakes (Heterodon simus) in red and white color phases, at a private collection.

These individuals are “playing dead”, a common defense tactic for this species as some predators don’t want to touch something that’s sick, dying or dead.

This species is listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.

Photo

ANI111-00023

A southern hognose snake (Heterodon simus) in red and white color phases, at a private collection.

This individual is “playing dead”, a common defense tactic for this species as some predators don’t want to touch something that’s sick, dying or dead.

This species is listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.

Photo

ANI111-00022

A southern hognose snake (Heterodon simus) in red and white color phases, at a private collection.

This species is listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.

Photo

ANI111-00021

A southern hognose snake (Heterodon simus) in red and white color phases, at a private collection.

This species is listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.

Photo

ANI111-00020

A southern hognose snake (Heterodon simus) in red and white color phases, at a private collection.

In many frames, they are shown “playing dead”, a common defense tactic for this species as some predators don’t want to touch something that’s sick, dying or dead.

This species is listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.

Photo

INS011-00050

Cook Strait giant weta (Deinacrida rugosa) at Zealandia, a wildlife preserve in Wellington.

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BIR060-00055

The black spur-winged goose, Plectropterus gambensis niger, at Sylvan Heights Bird Park. This species has spurs on the wing joints that can be used defensively.

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BIR060-00056

The black spur-winged goose, Plectropterus gambensis niger, at Sylvan Heights Bird Park. This species has spurs on the wing joints that can be used defensively.

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BIR060-00057

The black spur-winged goose, Plectropterus gambensis niger, at Sylvan Heights Bird Park. This species has spurs on the wing joints that can be used defensively.

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INS006-00138

A Sydney funnelweb spider (Atrax robustus) at the Taronga Zoo.

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INS006-00139

A Sydney funnelweb spider (Atrax robustus) at the Taronga Zoo.

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INS006-00140

A Sydney funnelweb spider (Atrax robustus) at the Taronga Zoo.

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INS005-00044

A female jungle nymph walking stick (Heteropteryx dilatata) in a defensive posture, at Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo.

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ANI082-00166

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

Photo

ANI082-00024

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

Photo

ANI082-00025

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

Photo

ANI082-00026

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

Photo

ANI082-00027

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

Photo

ANI082-00028

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

Photo

ANI082-00029

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

Photo

ANI082-00030

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

Photo

ANI082-00031

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

Photo

ANI063-00013

A southern three-banded armadillo (Tolypeutes matacus) at the Lincoln Children’s Zoo, Lincoln, Nebraska. (IUCN: Near Threatened)

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ANI063-00012

A southern three-banded armadillo (Tolypeutes matacus) at the Lincoln Children’s Zoo, Lincoln, Nebraska. (IUCN: Near Threatened)

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ANI063-00011

A southern three-banded armadillo (Tolypeutes matacus) at the Lincoln Children’s Zoo, Lincoln, Nebraska. (IUCN: Near Threatened)

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ANI063-00015

A southern three-banded armadillo (Tolypeutes matacus) at the Lincoln Children’s Zoo, Lincoln, Nebraska. (IUCN: Near Threatened)

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ANI074-00099

A tiger rat snake (Spilotes pullatus) profile at the Gladys Porter Zoo.

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ANI074-00097

A tiger rat snake (Spilotes pullatus) profile at the Gladys Porter Zoo.

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ANI074-00098

A tiger rat snake (Spilotes pullatus) profile at the Gladys Porter Zoo.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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