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ANI040-00255

An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered mature male drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) named Lyle at Zoo Atlanta.

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ANI040-00256

An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered mature male drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) named Lyle at Zoo Atlanta.

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ANI040-00257

An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered mature male drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) named Lyle at Zoo Atlanta.

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ANI040-00258

An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered mature male drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) named Lyle at Zoo Atlanta.

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ANI040-00259

An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered mature male drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) named Lyle at Zoo Atlanta.

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ANI079-00236

Bush meat shoppers pay to have the fur singed off a drill monkey in Malabo on Bioko island, Equatorial Guinea.

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ANI079-00235

An orphaned mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx) in the market at Malabo on Bioko island, Equatorial Guinea.

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ANI082-00181

Aerials of the Jonah Field in the Green River Basin, Wyoming. A once-wild area that’s now an industrial zone due to natural gas drilling. Sage grouse, mule deer and pronghorn antelope habitat has mostly been ruined here, with no end in sight as the drilling increases across the Pinedale Anticline, the large mesa that caps the gas deposits.

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ANI082-00182

Aerials of the Jonah Field in the Green River Basin, Wyoming. A once-wild area that’s now an industrial zone due to natural gas drilling. Sage grouse, mule deer and pronghorn antelope habitat has mostly been ruined here, with no end in sight as the drilling increases across the Pinedale Anticline, the large mesa that caps the gas deposits.

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ANI082-00103

An aerial of the Bowden natural gas drilling area along the MIlk river northeast of Malta, Montana.

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ENV021-00081

On board a PHI helicopter/media flight covering the deep water horizon oil spill at the spill site, two types of burning are now going on. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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ENV021-00082

On board a PHI helicopter/media flight covering the deep water horizon oil spill at the spill site, two types of burning are now going on. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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ENV021-00083

On board a PHI helicopter/media flight covering the deep water horizon oil spill at the spill site, two types of burning are now going on. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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ENV021-00050

This aerial shows two types of burn-offs used on the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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ENV021-00051

This aerial shows two types of burn-offs used on the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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ANI064-00050

A pair of captive orphaned drills (Mandrillus leucophaeus) that live in a cage behind a restaurant in the Ela Nguema section of Malabo, Equatorial Guinea, Africa. The male has been in this cage made of construction rebar for six years. Species is endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered

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ANI064-00051

A captive orphaned drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) that lives in a cage behind a restaurant in the Ela Nguema section of Malabo, Equatorial Guinea, Africa. The male has been in this cage made of construction rebar for six years. Species is endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered

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ANI064-00046

A pair of captive orphaned drills (Mandrillus leucophaeus) that live in a cage behind a restaurant in the Ela Nguema section of Malabo, Equatorial Guinea, Africa. The male has been in this cage made of construction rebar for six years. Species is endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered

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ANI064-00047

A captive orphaned drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea, Africa. The male has been in this cage made of construction rebar for six years. Species is endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered.

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ANI064-00048

The hand of a captive orphaned drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea, Africa. The male has been in this cage made of construction rebar for six years. Species is endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered.

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ANI064-00049

The hand of a captive orphaned drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea, Africa. The male has been in this cage made of construction rebar for six years. Species is endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered.

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ANI064-00045

A pair of captive orphaned drills (Mandrillus leucophaeus) that live in a cage behind a restaurant in the Ela Nguema section of Malabo, Equatorial Guinea, Africa. The male has been in this cage made of construction rebar for six years. Species is endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered

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ANI064-00009

A captive, five-month-old mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx) in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea. IUCN: Vulnerable

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ENV011-00022

Encana-owned drilling sites on the mamm field near Rifle/Silt, Colorado. These rigs are drilling amongst the 40-acre housing sites in the Grass Mesa subdivision. The pipe drills some 60 feet per hour at dusk.

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ENV011-00021

Encana-owned drilling sites on the mamm field near Rifle/Silt, Colorado. These rigs are drilling amongst the 40-acre housing sites in the Grass Mesa subdivision. The pipe drills some 60 feet per hour at dusk.

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ENV011-00020

A sign warns drillers of potential risk at a site near Rifle/Silt, Colorado.

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ENV011-00019

Encana-owned drilling sites on the mamm field near Rifle/Silt, Colorado. These rigs are drilling amongst the 40-acre housing sites in the Grass Mesa subdivision. The pipe drills some 60 feet per hour at dusk.

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ENV011-00018

Encana-owned drilling sites on the mamm field near Rifle/Silt, Colorado. These rigs are drilling amongst the 40-acre housing sites in the Grass Mesa subdivision. The pipe drills some 60 feet per hour at dusk.

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ENV011-00017

Encana-owned drilling sites on the mamm field near Rifle/Silt, Colorado. These rigs are drilling amongst the 40-acre housing sites in the Grass Mesa subdivision. The pipe drills some 60 feet per hour at dusk.

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ENV011-00016

Encana-owned drilling sites on the mamm field near Rifle/Silt, Colorado. These rigs are drilling amongst the 40-acre housing sites in the Grass Mesa subdivision. The pipe drills some 60 feet per hour at dusk.

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ENV011-00015

Encana-owned drilling sites on the mamm field near Rifle/Silt, Colorado. These rigs are drilling amongst the 40-acre housing sites in the Grass Mesa subdivision. The pipe drills some 60 feet per hour at dusk.

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ENV013-00043

A coal bed methane crew near Buffalo, Wyoming drills for oil.

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ENV013-00042

Drillers take a rest after working to free gas in Buffalo, Wyoming.

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ENV013-00041

Drillers take a nap after working to free gas in Buffalo, Wyoming.

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ENV016-00014

Ranchers move cattle through a compressor station on their Bureau of Land Management grazing allotment in Aztec, New Mexico.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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