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A biologist looks at a long-snouted cutin frog (Pristimantis appendiculatus) in the cloud forest reserve near Mindo, Ecuador.

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An anole (Polychrotidae) in the cloud forest reserve near Mindo, Ecuador.

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An anole (Polychrotidae) in the cloud forest reserve near Mindo, Ecuador.

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A velvet-purple coronet hummingbird (Boissonneaua jardini) in a cloud forest reserve near Mindo, Ecuador.

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Searching for frogs along the cloud forest reserve near Mindo, Ecuador.

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A biologist searches for amphibians in a cloud forest reserve near Mindo, Ecuador.

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A team searching for amphibians in a cloud forest reserve near Mindo, Ecuador.

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A marsupial frog (Gastrotheca cuencana) at a captive breeding facility in Ecuador. Formerly known as Azuay marsupial frog (Gastrotheca litonedis).

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Atelopus spumarius at a captive breeding facility in Ecuador. Though the species is listed as Vulnerable, almost all Atelopus species still in existence are in serious trouble if not extinct.

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Rana marsupial frog (Gastrotheca testudinea) at a captive breeding at Pontificia Universidad Catolica in Quito, Ecuador.

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A marsupial frog (Gastrotheca pseustes) at a captive breeding at Pontificia Universidad Catolica in Quito, Ecuador. (IUCN: EN)

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A care taker holds up a specimen of Gastrotheca pseutes at a captive breeding at Pontificia Universidad Catòlica in Quito, Ecuador. (IUCN: EN)

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Atelopus nanay at a captive breeding at Pontificia Universidad Catolica in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is critically endangered and very well could be extinct in the wild. Only seven animals are in captivity. (IUCN: CR)

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Portraits of Hyloscirtus pantostictus at a captive breeding at Pontificia Universidad Catòlica in Quito, Ecuador. This is an endangered frog. This is the only one in captivity and it could be extinct in the wild. (IUCN: EN)

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Oophaga sylvatica, the “little devil poison frog” at a captive breeding facility at Pontificia Universidad Catolica in Quito, Ecuador. The species is being heavily affected by habitat loss.

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Extinct species of amphibians at Pontificia Universidad Catòlica in Quito, Ecuador. Many have gone extinct in the last decade or less.

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Ceratophrys stolzmanni, the Pacific horned frog, an endemic burrowing species at the captive breeding facility in Quito, Ecuador. (IUCN: Vulnerable)

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A live male harlequin frog (Atelopus sp.) in amplexus with a female, dead from chytrid fungus, near Limon, Ecuador. The male died a few days later of the same disease. This species is critically endangered and headed toward extinction due to habitat loss and disease, including chytrid fungus.

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A rare male Atelopus frog is swabbed for chytrid fungus by a scientist near Limon, Ecuador.

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An egg mass with developing tadpoles of a glass frog species, possibly Cochranella flavopuctata, near Limon, Ecuador.

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A rare Atelopus frog near Limon, Ecuador. The genus — one of the most threatened in Central and South America — has been wiped out in most other places, and this patch of habitat is threatened by road expansion.

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Tim Krynak holds up a specimen of a Ecuador cochran frog, Nymphargus griffithsi (IUCN: Vulnerable), a type of glass frog. Tim and his wife Kathy have been coming to this place near Mindo, Ecuador for several years to monitor amphibian life. The Krynaks and their team hope that chytrid fungus does not show up here, but know that many other parts of Ecuador have already seen catastrophic declines due to the fungus. “Every time we come back, if it’s quiet on that first night, we think, ‘oh no’. We’re scared. We think, this is it,” said Tim.

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A tarantula (Aphonopelma sp.) in Mindo, Ecuador, near the cloud forest.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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