Photo

ESA001-00159

A prodigy of adaptation, the endangered least tern (Sterna albifrons) survived the test of evolution by nesting on barren sandbars, protected from predators by the swift flow of surrounding rivers. These moated habitats are created by naturally occurring spring floods, which humans now spend millions to prevent.

Photo

ESA001-00160

This tiny snail darter (Percina tanasi) stalled the construction of Tellico dam on the Little Tennessee river. Though the dam was built, the Endangered Species Act was henceforth seen in many quarters as an enemy of progress.

Photo

ESA001-00161

This bird earned questionable notoriety as a job buster. It is the northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis occidentalis), listed as threatened in 1990; it w as expected to cause thousands of job losses by disrupting logging in the forests of the Pacific Northwest. The actual cost of protection to the regional economy is not yet known.

Photo

ESA001-00156

Fragmentation of fragile habitat has added to the woes of the once-hardy desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizi). They are collected from soon-to-be-developed lands and sent to a center where they are adopted, euthanized (if ill), or used for research.

Photo

ESA001-00157

South of Los Angeles the implacable sprawl of single-family homes like these has reached critical mass. Or so think local environmentalists, who are challenging new developments to safeguard dwindling parcels of coastal sage scrub, habitat of the California gnatcatcher. Increasingly, developers compromise by setting aside land for imperiled species.

Photo

ESA001-00084

Slackwater darters (Etheostoma boschungi) at the Conservation Fisheries, Knoxville, Tennessee. (IUCN: Endangered, US: Threatened)

Photo

ESA001-00148

Lewis and Clark spotted their first grizzly bear at the place where the Heart River meets the Missouri River near Bismarck, ND. Today it serves as a corn field.

Photo

ESA001-00149

Federally endangered Alabama beach mice (Peromyscus polionotus ammobates) are captured and measured as part of a population survey along the Fort Morgan Peninsula near Gulf Shores, Alabama. Houses and condos have inundated the area, with many more planned, eliminating more habitat yearly. Many more are planned. Besides development, feral cats pose a huge problem as well.

Photo

ESA001-00150

Gopher tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus) (US: Threatened, IUCN: Vulnerable) in the southeastern U.S. often end up as roadkill. Invasive fire ants and armadillos prey on their eggs and young, while urban expansion, logging and fire mismanagement degrade tortoise habitat, pushing these reptiles closer to the edge.

Photo

ESA001-00151

A critically endangered Miami blue butterfly (Cyclargus thomasi bethunebakeri) along with a caterpillar. This species is being bred in captivity at the McGuire Center at the University of Florida. Thousands have been released into the wild in South Florida over the past three years. So far, results are indeterminate. Fewer than 250 exist in the wild, making it one of the rarest butterflies in North America.

Photo

ESA001-00152

A Key Largo woodrat (Neotoma floridana) (US: Endangered) at Disney’s Animal Kingdom. Fewer than 250 adults are believed left in the wild, in just two parcels of public land on Key Largo. Captive breeding efforts are underway at both Disney’s Animal Kingdom and the Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa, thought the captive population still numbers less than 50 animals.

Photo

ESA001-00153

Perforate reindeer lichen (Cladonia perforata) at Archbold Biological Station, Florida. (US: Endangered)

Photo

ESA001-00143

Federally endangered woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) named Costello. He is eight years old.

Photo

ESA001-00144

A northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis) named Opal at Wildlife Images, a wildlife rehabilitation and education center near Merlin, Oregon. (IUCN: Near Threatened; US: Threatened)

Photo

ESA001-00145

A captive northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) in healthy habitat in the Siskiyou National Forest near Merlin, Oregon. (IUCN: Near Threatened; US: Threatened)

Photo

ESA001-00146

A grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) at the Sedgwick County Zoo.

Photo

ESA001-00147

A grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) at the Sedgwick County Zoo.

Photo

ESA001-00140

An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered mountain yellow-legged frog (Rana muscosa). Population locality: San Bernardino.

Photo

ESA001-00141

A three-year-old ocelot (Leopardus pardalis). (Captive)

Photo

ESA001-00142

A group of juvenile pink mucket mussels (Lampsilis abrupta). These endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered animals are four months old, and are from the Osage River in Missouri. They are part of a captive rearing project at the Missouri State University.

Photo

ESA001-00134

A Nichol’s turk’s head cactus (Echinocactus horizonthalonius var. nicholii). (US: Endangered)

Photo

ESA001-00135

A Nichol’s turk’s head cactus (Echinocactus horizonthalonius var. nicholii). (US: Endangered)

Photo

ESA001-00136

A Quitobaquito pupfish (Cyprinodon macularis eremus) at Organ Pipe National Park, Arizona. (US: Endangered)

Photo

ESA001-00137

An endangered (IUCN) relict leopard frog (Lithobates onca).

Photo

ESA001-00138

A captive Catalina Island fox (Urocyon littoralis catalinae) named Tachi at Quail Valley Fox Clinic in Middle Ranch on Catalina Island, California. (US: Endangered, IUCN: Critically Endangered)

Photo

ESA001-00139

An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered mountain yellow-legged frog (Rana muscosa). Population locality: San Bernardino.

Photo

ESA001-00125

Northern monkshood (Aconitum noveboracense), a plant native to eastern Iowa and in nearby states. (US: Threatened)

Photo

ESA001-00128

A vulnerable (IUCN) and federally endangered Texas blind salamander (Eurycea rathbuni) at the Detroit Zoo.

Photo

ESA001-00130

A masked bobwhite quail (Colinus virginanus ridgwayi) at the Phoenix Zoo, Phoenix, Arizona. (US: Endangered)

Photo

ESA001-00131

An Arizona hedgehog cactus (Echinocereus triglochidiatus var. arizonicus). (US: Endangered)

Photo

ESA001-00123

Alula (Brighamia insignis) at the U.S. Botanic Garden, Washington, DC. This critically endangered Hawiian plant now has to be hand pollinated because botanists believe that its pollinator is extinct.

Photo

ESA001-00124

A Tennessee coneflower (Echinacea tennesseenisi) at the U.S. Botanic Garden, Washington, DC. (US: Endangered)

Photo

ESA001-00114

A whooping crane (Grus americana) at the Audubon Nature Institute, New Orleans, Louisiana. (US: Endangered, IUCN: Endangered)

Photo

ESA001-00115

A whooping crane (Grus americana) at the Audubon Nature Institute, New Orleans, Louisiana. (US: Endangered, IUCN: Endangered)

Photo

ESA001-00116

A red knot (Calidris canutus rufa) in Gandys Beach, New Jersey.

Photo

ESA001-00117

A red knot (Calidris canutus) is released into the wild.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

Speaking Engagements

Joel is a popular keynote speaker with conservation, corporate, and civic groups.

Hire him to entertain and inspire your audience.

Book Joel To Speak

The Photo Ark

Joel is the founder of the Photo Ark, a groundbreaking effort to document every species in captivity before it’s too late.

Explore the Photo Ark

Visit Our Store

Every purchase goes directly to support our mission: getting the public to care and helping to save species from extinction.

Help Us Build the Ark