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A road near Queen Elizabeth National Park in Uganda, Africa.

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A road near Queen Elizabeth National Park in Uganda, Africa.

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A ravine is demolished by a road-widening/gravel mining project in Ecuador.

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Runoff from a road-widening project clogs up a frog breeding stream near Limon, Ecuador.

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Two scientists examine a ravine demolished by a road-widening/gravel mining project in Ecuador. The spot was once prime amphibian habitat.

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A researcher surveys a ravine that was clogged by a road-widening/gravel mining project near Limon, Ecuador. The area was once prime amphibian habitat.

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A cliff in Alaska has slumped into the sea because of erosion from runoff, as a result of climate change.

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A cliff in Alaska has slumped into the sea because of erosion from runoff, as a result of climate change.

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Scientists from the Toolik Research Station examine a thermokarst on Alaska’s North Slope. A thermokarst is a place where the permafrost has melted away, causing severe erosion.

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Scientists from the Toolik Research Station examine a thermokarst on Alaska’s North Slope. A thermokarst is a place where the permafrost has melted away, causing severe erosion.

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Scientists from the Toolik Research Station examine a thermokarst on Alaska’s North Slope. A thermokarst is a place where the permafrost has melted away, causing severe erosion.

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Scientists from the Toolik Research Station examine a thermokarst on Alaska’s North Slope. A thermokarst is a place where the permafrost has melted away, causing severe erosion.

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Scientists from the Toolik Research Station examine a thermokarst on Alaska’s North Slope. A thermokarst is a place where the permafrost has melted away, causing severe erosion.

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Runoff from the mountains in Cabeza Prieta NWR, (AZ) creates patterns on the desert floor. The plants that dot the landscape are not only a food source for the animals that live there, but important in preventing erosion as well

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Runoff from the mountains in Cabeza Prieta NWR, (AZ) creates patterns on the desert floor. The plants that dot the landscape are not only a food source for the animals that live there, but important in preventing erosion as well

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Runoff from the mountains in Cabeza Prieta NWR, (AZ) creates patterns on the desert floor. The plants that dot the landscape are not only a food source for the animals that live there, but important in preventing erosion as well

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Runoff from the mountains in Cabeza Prieta NWR, (AZ) creates patterns on the desert floor. The plants that dot the landscape are not only a food source for the animals that live there, but important in preventing erosion as well

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Runoff from the mountains in Cabeza Prieta NWR, (AZ) creates patterns on the desert floor. The plants that dot the landscape are not only a food source for the animals that live there, but important in preventing erosion as well

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A split-hull hopper dredge opens up in the Gulf of Mexico and dumps silt from erosion that has been deposited in the Mississippi. The river is constantly dredged near the city ofNew Orleans to keep it open to shipping and barge traffic.The silt from that dredging is most often dumped in the Gulf of Mexico.

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A split-hull hopper dredge opens up in the Gulf of Mexico and dumps silt from erosion that has been deposited in the Mississippi. The river is constantly dredged near the city of New Orleans to keep it open to shipping and barge traffic. The silt from that dredging is most often dumped in the Gulf of Mexico.

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Barges filled with hazardous chemicals move through the Intercoastal Waterway in Sabine NWR every day. In addition to marsh erosion, one spill could destroy the ecosystem.

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Barges filled with hazardous chemicals move through the Intercoastal Waterway in Sabine NWR every day. In addition to marsh erosion, one spill could destroy the ecosystem.

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Barges filled with hazardous chemicals move through the Intercoastal Waterway in Sabine NWR every day. In addition to marsh erosion, one spill could destroy the ecosystem.

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Barges filled with hazardous chemicals move through the Intercoastal Waterway in Sabine NWR every day. In addition to marsh erosion, one spill could destroy the ecosystem.

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Barges filled with hazardous chemicals move through the Intercoastal Waterway in Sabine NWR every day. In addition to marsh erosion, one spill could destroy the ecosystem.

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Barges filled with hazardous chemicals move through the Intercoastal Waterway in Sabine NWR every day. In addition to marsh erosion, one spill could destroy the ecosystem.

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Volunteers work to plant beach grass in a sand dune along the Louisiana coast. The dune was eroding rapidly due to rising ocean levels.

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A dredge ship piles up fill to try and save buildings on a beach. Rising ocean levels eroded their foundations and caused structural damage.

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Volunteers work to plant beach grass in a sand dune along the Louisiana coast. The dune was eroding rapidly due to rising ocean levels.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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