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ANI110-00289

Paru morph of a little devil poison frog or Kiki poison frog (Oophaga sylvatica) at St. Louis Zoo. This facility is famous for studying cures for chytrid fungus and other threats.
The parental stock came from Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador at the Reserva Otokiki.

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ANI110-00288

Paru morph of a little devil poison frog or Kiki poison frog (Oophaga sylvatica) at St. Louis Zoo. This facility is famous for studying cures for chytrid fungus and other threats.
The parental stock came from Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador at the Reserva Otokiki.

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ANI110-00124

A sun glass frog tadpole (Hyalinobatrachium aureoguttatum) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal was originally from Durango, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador.

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ANI110-00107

A Tsachila croaking frog (Scinax tsachila) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal was originally from Guadual, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador.

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ANI110-00106

A Tsachila croaking frog (Scinax tsachila) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal was originally from Guadual, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador.

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ANI110-00105

A spotted-vent thin-toed frog (Leptodactylus ventrimaculatus) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal was originally from Guadual, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador.

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ANI110-00104

A spotted-vent thin-toed frog (Leptodactylus ventrimaculatus) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal was originally from Guadual, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador.

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ANI110-00103

A boulenger poison dart frog (Epipedobates boulengeri) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal was originally from Guadual, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador.

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ANI110-00102

A boulenger poison dart frog (Epipedobates boulengeri) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal was originally from Guadual, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador.

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ANI110-00087

A Spurrell leaf frog (Agalychnis spurrelli) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Otokiki – Alto Tambo, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador.

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ANI110-00086

A Spurrell leaf frog (Agalychnis spurrelli) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Otokiki – Alto Tambo, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador.

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A Calcar monkey frog (Cruziohyla calcarifer) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Alto Tambo, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. This species is threatened by destruction of habitat, intensive agriculture and livestock, pollution, use of agrochemicals, mining, urban development and palm plantations.

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ANI110-00063

A Calcar monkey frog (Cruziohyla calcarifer) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Alto Tambo, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. This species is threatened by destruction of habitat, intensive agriculture and livestock, pollution, use of agrochemicals, mining, urban development and palm plantations.

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ANI110-00060

A black snub-nosed frog (Ctenophryne aterrima) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Alto Tambo, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. This species is threatened by destruction of habitat, intensive agriculture and livestock, pollution, use of agrochemicals, mining, urban development and palm plantations.

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ANI110-00059

A black snub-nosed frog (Ctenophryne aterrima) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Alto Tambo, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. This species is threatened by destruction of habitat, intensive agriculture and livestock, pollution, use of agrochemicals, mining, urban development and palm plantations.

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ANI110-00058

A yellow spotted cochran frog (Sachatamia albomaculata) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Quininde, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. This species is threatened by destruction of habitat, intensive agriculture and livestock, pollution, use of agrochemicals, mining, urban development.

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ANI110-00057

A yellow spotted cochran frog (Sachatamia albomaculata) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Quininde, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. This species is threatened by destruction of habitat, intensive agriculture and livestock, pollution, use of agrochemicals, mining, urban development.

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ANI110-00056

A sun glass frog (Hyalinobatrachium aureoguttatum) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Durango, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. Despite its local abundance in several sites and its adaptability to a certain degree of modification, this species faces serious threats due to the destruction of habitat, intensive agriculture and livestock, pollution, use of agrochemicals, mining, urban development.

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ANI110-00055

A sun glass frog (Hyalinobatrachium aureoguttatum) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Durango, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. Despite its local abundance in several sites and its adaptability to a certain degree of modification, this species faces serious threats due to the destruction of habitat, intensive agriculture and livestock, pollution, use of agrochemicals, mining, urban development.

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ANI110-00054

A sun glass frog (Hyalinobatrachium aureoguttatum) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Durango, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. Despite its local abundance in several sites and its adaptability to a certain degree of modification, this species faces serious threats due to the destruction of habitat, intensive agriculture and livestock, pollution, use of agrochemicals, mining, urban development.

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ANI110-00030

A pair of painted tree frogs (Boana picturata) in amplexus at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. These animals are originally from the Reserva Otokiki – Alto Tambo, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. The species experiences habitat loss due to mining, deforestation road constructions, farm activities, agriculture, mining and urban development.

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ANI110-00029

A painted tree frog (Boana picturata) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from the Reserva Otokiki – Alto Tambo, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. The species experiences habitat loss due to mining, deforestation road constructions, farm activities, agriculture, mining and urban development.

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ANI110-00028

A pair of painted tree frogs (Boana picturata) in amplexus at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. These animals are originally from the Reserva Otokiki – Alto Tambo, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. The species experiences habitat loss due to mining, deforestation road constructions, farm activities, agriculture, mining and urban development.

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ANI110-00027

A painted tree frog (Boana picturata) sits on a camera at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from the Reserva Otokiki – Alto Tambo, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. The species experiences habitat loss due to mining, deforestation road constructions, farm activities, agriculture, mining and urban development.

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ANI110-00026

A painted tree frog (Boana picturata) sits on a camera at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from the Reserva Otokiki – Alto Tambo, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. The species experiences habitat loss due to mining, deforestation road constructions, farm activities, agriculture, mining and urban development.

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ANI110-00025

A painted tree frog (Boana picturata) sits on a camera at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from the Reserva Otokiki – Alto Tambo, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. The species experiences habitat loss due to mining, deforestation road constructions, farm activities, agriculture, mining and urban development.

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ANI110-00024

A painted tree frog (Boana picturata) sits on a camera at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from the Reserva Otokiki – Alto Tambo, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. The species experiences habitat loss due to mining, deforestation road constructions, farm activities, agriculture, mining and urban development.

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ANI110-00005

A giant Blomberg toad (Rhaebo blombergi) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Siete Cascadas, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. A very large toad species, easily measuring up to 25 cm. Local people claim it has measured up to 40cm. The species is declining due to deforestation and agricultural activities, especially palm plantations. Other threats include mining and the introduction of exotic species to the wild.

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ANI110-00004

A giant Blomberg toad (Rhaebo blombergi) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Siete Cascadas, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. A very large toad species, easily measuring up to 25 cm. Local people claim it has measured up to 40cm. The species is declining due to deforestation and agricultural activities, especially palm plantations. Other threats include mining and the introduction of exotic species to the wild.

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ANI110-00003

A giant Blomberg toad (Rhaebo blombergi) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Siete Cascadas, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. A very large toad species, easily measuring up to 25 cm. Local people claim it has measured up to 40cm. The species is declining due to deforestation and agricultural activities, especially palm plantations. Other threats include mining and the introduction of exotic species to the wild.

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ANI110-00002

A giant Blomberg toad (Rhaebo blombergi) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Siete Cascadas, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. A very large toad species, easily measuring up to 25 cm. Local people claim it has measured up to 40cm. The species is declining due to deforestation and agricultural activities, especially palm plantations. Other threats include mining and the introduction of exotic species to the wild.

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ANI110-00001

A giant Blomberg toad (Rhaebo blombergi) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Siete Cascadas, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. A very large toad species, easily measuring up to 25 cm. Local people claim it has measured up to 40cm. The species is declining due to deforestation and agricultural activities, especially palm plantations. Other threats include mining and the introduction of exotic species to the wild.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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