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A partula snail (Partula nodosa) at the St. Louis Zoo’s Monsanto Insectarium.

This species is listed as extinct in the wild on the IUCN Red List.

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Bryn, the federally endangered Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), sat for this portrait in 2007 at the Oregon Zoo in Portland, Oregon. She was one of two female Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits left, the end of the line for this race of animals. Since there are no males left, this means only animals intercrossed with the Idaho race will survive. She died in 2008, marking the end of her genetic line. This subpopulation lost its sagebrush habitat as the land was developed for agriculture in the state of Washington.

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An extinct in the wild (IUCN) Simandoa cave roach (Simandoa conserfariam) at the Bugarium at the Albuquerque BioPark.

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An extinct in the wild (IUCN) Simandoa cave roach (Simandoa conserfariam) at the Bugarium at the Albuquerque BioPark.

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Extinct Pheres blue butterflies (Icaricia icarioides pheres) at the McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity.

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An extinct Pheres blue butterfly (Icaricia icarioides pheres) at the McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity.

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Two extinct Pheres blue butterflies (Icaricia icarioides pheres) at the McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity.

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An extinct Pheres blue butterfly (Icaricia icarioides pheres) at the McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity.

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Two extinct Sthenele wood nymphs (mounted on pins) (Cercyonis sthenele sthenele) at the McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity.

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An extinct Sthenele wood nymph (mounted on a pin) (Cercyonis sthenele sthenele) at the McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity.

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Two extinct Sthenele wood nymphs (mounted on pins) (Cercyonis sthenele sthenele) at the McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity.

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An extinct rockland skipper (mounted on pins) (Hesperia meskei pinocayo) at the McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity.

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Two extinct rockland skippers (mounted on pins) (Hesperia meskei pinocayo) at the McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity.

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Extinct Atossa fritillaries (mounted on pins) (Speyeria adiaste atossa) at the McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity.

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An extinct Atossa fritillary (mounted on a pin) (Speyeria adiaste atossa) at the McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity.

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A possibly extinct Bachman’s warbler (Vermivora bachmanii) at Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

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A possibly extinct Bachman’s warbler (Vermivora bachmanii) at Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

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A possibly extinct Bachman’s warbler (Vermivora bachmanii) at Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

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The last known critically endangered Rabbs’ fringe-limbed tree frog (Ecnomiohyla rabborum) at the Atlanta Botanical Garden. (Image ID: ANI078-00515)

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An extinct splendid poison frog (Oophaga speciosa) preserved in alcohol at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Gamboa, Panama.

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Extinct Chiriqui harlequin frogs (Atelopus chiriquiensis) preserved in alcohol at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Gamboa, Panama.

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The last known critically endangered Rabbs’ fringe-limbed tree frog (Ecnomiohyla rabborum) at the Atlanta Botanical Garden. This photo was taken in 2013. This frog passed away in 2016, making the species extinct.

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The last known critically endangered Rabbs’ fringe-limbed tree frog (Ecnomiohyla rabborum) at the Atlanta Botanical Garden. This photo was taken in 2013. This frog passed away in 2016, making the species extinct.

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The last known critically endangered Rabbs’ fringe-limbed tree frog (Ecnomiohyla rabborum) at the Atlanta Botanical Garden. This photo was taken in 2013. This frog passed away in 2016, making the species extinct.

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The last known critically endangered Rabbs’ fringe-limbed tree frog (Ecnomiohyla rabborum) at the Atlanta Botanical Garden. This photo was taken in 2013. This frog passed away in 2016, making the species extinct.

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The last known critically endangered Rabbs’ fringe-limbed tree frog (Ecnomiohyla rabborum) at the Atlanta Botanical Garden. This photo was taken in 2013. This frog passed away in 2016, making the species extinct.

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Rabbs’ fringe-limbed treefrog (Ecnomiohyla rabborum) at the Atlanta Botanical Garden. This old male was the very last of his kind. This photograph was taken in 2014. He died in 2016, making his species extinct.

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The last eggs of the Carolina parakeet (Conuropsis carolinensis) at the Florida Museum of Natural History. These were collected in the late 1920’s at Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park, Okeechobee, FL.

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The extinct Xerces blue butterfly (Glaucopsyche xerces). This photo was taken at the Maguire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity, Gainesville, FL. This is located on the campus of the University of Florida and is part of the Florida Museum of Natural History.

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Hands frame specimens of freshwater mussels belonging to the genus Epioblasma. The three in the very center are acornshells, last found alive in the 1970s. They are surrounded in the central box by catspaws, which are in rapid decline. The rest of the photo shows ten more Epioblasma species that are either extinct or nearly so.

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Portraits of ‘Orange’, the last dusky seaside sparrow (Ammodramus maritimus nigrescens). This species went extinct in 1987, after their last habitats in northeast Florida were ruined by man, from the construction of an expressway to mosquito spraying. The bird, along with ‘blue’ another one of the last to die, are kept in vials of alcohol in the Natural History Museum at Florida State University.

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The extinct Xerces blue butterfly (Glaucopsyche xerces). This photo was taken at the Maguire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity, Gainesville, FL. This is located on the campus of the University of Florida and is part of the Florida Museum of Natural History.

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The extinct Xerces blue butterfly (Glaucopsyche xerces). This photo was taken at the Maguire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity, Gainesville, FL. This is located on the campus of the University of Florida and is part of the Florida Museum of Natural History.

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The extinct Xerces blue butterfly (Glaucopsyche xerces). This photo was taken at the Maguire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity, Gainesville, FL. This is located on the campus of the University of Florida and is part of the Florida Museum of Natural History.

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The extinct Xerces blue butterfly (Glaucopsyche xerces). This photo was taken at the Maguire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity, Gainesville, FL. This is located on the campus of the University of Florida and is part of the Florida Museum of Natural History.

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The extinct Xerces blue butterfly (Glaucopsyche xerces). This photo was taken at the Maguire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity, Gainesville, FL. This is located on the campus of the University of Florida and is part of the Florida Museum of Natural History.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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