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ANI031-00108

Bryn, the federally endangered Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), sat for this portrait in 2007 at the Oregon Zoo in Portland, Oregon. She was one of two female Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits left, the end of the line for this species of animals. Since there are no males left, this means only animals intercrossed with the Idaho race will survive. She died in 2008, marking the end of her genetic line. This subpopulation lost its sagebrush habitat as the land was developed for agriculture in the state of Washington.

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ANI031-00109

Bryn, the federally endangered Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), sat for this portrait in 2007 at the Oregon Zoo in Portland, Oregon. She was one of two female Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits left, the end of the line for this species of animals. Since there are no males left, this means only animals intercrossed with the Idaho race will survive. She died in 2008, marking the end of her genetic line. This subpopulation lost its sagebrush habitat as the land was developed for agriculture in the state of Washington.

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ANI031-00111

Bryn, the federally endangered Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), sat for this portrait in 2007 at the Oregon Zoo in Portland, Oregon. She was one of two female Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits left, the end of the line for this species of animals. Since there are no males left, this means only animals intercrossed with the Idaho race will survive. She died in 2008, marking the end of her genetic line. This subpopulation lost its sagebrush habitat as the land was developed for agriculture in the state of Washington.

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ANI031-00112

Bryn, the federally endangered Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), sat for this portrait in 2007 at the Oregon Zoo in Portland, Oregon. She was one of two female Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits left, the end of the line for this species of animals. Since there are no males left, this means only animals intercrossed with the Idaho race will survive. She died in 2008, marking the end of her genetic line. This subpopulation lost its sagebrush habitat as the land was developed for agriculture in the state of Washington.

Photo

ANI031-00101

Bryn, the federally endangered Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), sat for this portrait in 2007 at the Oregon Zoo in Portland, Oregon. She was one of two female Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits left, the end of the line for this species of animals. Since there are no males left, this means only animals intercrossed with the Idaho race will survive. She died in 2008, marking the end of her genetic line. This subpopulation lost its sagebrush habitat as the land was developed for agriculture in the state of Washington.

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ANI031-00103

Bryn, the federally endangered Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), sat for this portrait in 2007 at the Oregon Zoo in Portland, Oregon. She was one of two female Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits left, the end of the line for this species of animals. Since there are no males left, this means only animals intercrossed with the Idaho race will survive. She died in 2008, marking the end of her genetic line. This subpopulation lost its sagebrush habitat as the land was developed for agriculture in the state of Washington.

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ANI076-00012

Extinct species of amphibians at Pontificia Universidad Catòlica in Quito, Ecuador. Many have gone extinct in the last decade or less.

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ESA001-00011

Palos Verdes blue butterflies (Glaucopsyche lygdamus palosverdesensis) at the McGuire Center, Gainesville, Florida.

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Portraits of “Orange”, the last dusky seaside sparrow (Ammodramus maritimus nigriscens). This species went extinct in 1987, after their last habitats in northeast Florida were ruined by man, from the construction of an expressway to mosquito spraying. This bird is kept in a vial of alcohol in the Florida Museum of Natural History at the University of Florida.

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Butterfly splitfins or butterfly goodeids (Ameca splendens) at the Denver Aquarium, Denver, Colorado. This species is considered extinct in the wild.

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Butterfly splitfins or butterfly goodeids (Ameca splendens) at the Denver Aquarium, Denver, Colorado. This species is considered extinct in the wild.

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Butterfly splitfins or butterfly goodeids (Ameca splendens) at the Denver Aquarium, Denver, Colorado. This species is considered extinct in the wild.

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Butterfly splitfins or butterfly goodeids (Ameca splendens) at the Denver Aquarium, Denver, Colorado. This species is considered extinct in the wild.

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Butterfly splitfins or butterfly goodeids (Ameca splendens) at the Denver Aquarium, Denver, Colorado. This species is considered extinct in the wild.

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FIS011-00092

Butterfly splitfins or butterfly goodeids (Ameca splendens) at the Denver Aquarium, Denver, Colorado. This species is considered extinct in the wild.

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FIS011-00093

Butterfly splitfins or butterfly goodeids (Ameca splendens) at the Denver Aquarium, Denver, Colorado. This species is considered extinct in the wild.

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FIS011-00094

Butterfly splitfins or butterfly goodeids (Ameca splendens) at the Denver Aquarium, Denver, Colorado. This species is considered extinct in the wild.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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