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A vulnerable (IUCN) and federally threatened loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) at the Riverbanks Zoo, Columbia, South Carolina.

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A vulnerable (IUCN) and federally endangered boulder darter (Etheostoma wapiti) at the Conservation Fisheries, Knoxville, Tennessee.

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A federally endangered Mexican gray wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) at the Wild Canid Survival and Research Center.

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Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered American burying beetle (Nicrophorus americanus) at the St. Louis Zoo’s Monsanto Insectarium.

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Manchado, a Mexican spotted owl (Strix occidentalis lucida) at The Wildlife Center in Espanola, New Mexico.

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Emi, a female Sumatran rhino at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of Emi’s calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

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Emi, a female Sumatran rhino at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of Emi’s calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

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Emi, a female Sumatran rhino at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of Emi’s calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

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Emi, a female Sumatran rhino, with her three-week-old calf, at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of this calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

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Emi, a female Sumatran rhino, with her three-week-old calf, at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of this calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

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Emi, a female Sumatran rhino, with her three-week-old calf, at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of this calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

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Puerto Rican crested toad (Peltophryne lemur) at the Sedgwick County Zoo in Wichita, Kansas. (IUCN: Critically Endangered, and federally threatened)

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Emi, a female Sumatran rhino at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of Emi’s calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

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Emi, a female Sumatran rhino, with her three-week-old calf, at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of this calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

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Emi, a female Sumatran rhino, with her three-week-old calf, at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of this calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

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Emi, a female Sumatran rhino, with her three-week-old calf, at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of this calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

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Emi, a female Sumatran rhino at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of Emi’s calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

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Emi, a female Sumatran rhino, with her three-week-old calf, at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of this calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

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Emi, a female Sumatran rhino, with her three-week-old calf, at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of this calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

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Emi, a female Sumatran rhino, with her three-week-old calf, at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of this calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

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Emi, a female Sumatran rhino at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of Emi’s calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

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Emi, a female Sumatran rhino, with her three-week-old calf, at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of this calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

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Emi, a female Sumatran rhino, with her three-week-old calf, at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of this calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

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Emi, a female Sumatran rhino, with her three-week-old calf, at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of this calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

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Emi, a female Sumatran rhino at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of Emi’s calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

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Emi, a female Sumatran rhino, with her three-week-old calf, at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of this calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

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Emi, a female Sumatran rhino, with her three-week-old calf, at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of this calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

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Emi, a female Sumatran rhino, with her three-week-old calf, at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of this calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

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Emi, a female Sumatran rhino, with her three-week-old calf, at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of this calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

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Emi, a female Sumatran rhino at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are only nine Sumatran rhinos in captivity, so the birth of Emi’s calf is a tremendous event for the conservation of the species. Sumatran rhinos are being poached in the wild so quickly that biologists fear they could go extinct in the wild within the next 20 years.

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Nene geese (Branta sandvicensis) at the Great Plains Zoo, Sioux Falls, South Dakota. (IUCN: Vulnerable; US: Endangered)

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A federally endangered, American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) at the Kansas City Zoo.

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The endangered Stock Island tree snail in a housing development in Key Largo, Florida. The snail has been extinct in its native key, Stock Island, for years.

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The endangered Stock Island tree snail in a housing development in Key Largo, Florida. The snail has been extinct in its native key, Stock Island, for years.

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At the Eagle Fish Hatchery in Idaho, biologists take blood and eggs from the nearly-extinct snake River Sockeye salmon.

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At the Eagle Fish Hatchery in Idaho, biologists take blood and eggs from the nearly-extinct snake River Sockeye salmon.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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