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ANI077-00342

An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Virgin Islands boa (Chilabothrus granti) at Toledo Zoo.

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ESA002-00370

The federally endangered hairy rattleweed (Baptisia arachnifera) at the Atlanta Botanical Garden.

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FIS011-00234

Barrens topminnow (Fundulus julisia) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center. This species is endangered (IUCN). It is only found in the Barrens Plateau in middle Tennessee, making it one of the rarest fish in eastern North America.

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INS011-00038

Greater-arid land katydid (Neobarrettia spinosa) at the Insectarium in New Orleans.

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INS010-00019

African moon moth (Argema mimosae) at the Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo.

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FIS017-00008

A juvenile flathead catfish (Pylodictus olivaris) at Gavins Point National Fish Hatchery and Aquarium.

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INS021-00017

El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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INS021-00018

El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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INS021-00014

El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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INS021-00015

El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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INS021-00011

El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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INS021-00012

El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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INS021-00013

El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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INS021-00002

El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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INS021-00003

El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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INS021-00004

El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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INS021-00005

El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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INS021-00001

El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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PLA013-00022

The thorns and flower petals of a federally endangered Nichol’s Turk’s head cactus (Echinocactus horizonthalonius var. nicholii).

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ESA001-00624

A federally endangered Delhi Sands flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus abdominalis). With fewer than 1,000 individuals left, this is the only fly to be federally listed.

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ESA001-00625

A federally endangered Delhi Sands flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus abdominalis). With fewer than 1,000 individuals left, this is the only fly to be federally listed.

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ESA001-00626

A federally endangered Delhi Sands flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus abdominalis). With fewer than 1,000 individuals left, this is the only fly to be federally listed.

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ESA001-00622

A federally endangered Delhi Sands flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus abdominalis). With fewer than 1,000 individuals left, this is the only fly to be federally listed.

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ESA001-00623

A federally endangered Delhi Sands flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus abdominalis). With fewer than 1,000 individuals left, this is the only fly to be federally listed.

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SCE051-00126

A caterpillar hunter beetle (Calosoma granatense) on Urbina Bay, Isabela Island.

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SCE051-00127

A caterpillar hunter beetle (Calosoma granatense) on Urbina Bay, Isabela Island.

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SCE051-00025

A painted locust (Schistocerca melanocera) on North Seymour Island in Galapagos National Park.

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INS007-00088

Miami blue butterfly (Cyclargus thomasi bethunebakeri). This species is being captive bred at the McGuire Center at the Univ. of Florida. Thousands have been released into the wild in South Florida over the past three years. So far, results are indeterminate. Fewer than 250 exist in the wild, making it one of the rarest butterflies in North America.

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INS007-00091

Miami blue butterfly (Cyclargus thomasi bethunebakeri). This species is being captive bred at the McGuire Center at the Univ. of Florida. Thousands have been released into the wild in South Florida over the past three years. So far, results are indeterminate. Fewer than 250 exist in the wild, making it one of the rarest butterflies in North America.

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INS007-00095

Miami blue butterfly (Cyclargus thomasi bethunebakeri). This species is being captive bred at the McGuire Center at the Univ. of Florida. Thousands have been released into the wild in South Florida over the past three years. So far, results are indeterminate. Fewer than 250 exist in the wild, making it one of the rarest butterflies in North America.

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INS007-00087

Miami blue butterfly (Cyclargus thomasi bethunebakeri). This species is being captive bred at the McGuire Center at the Univ. of Florida. Thousands have been released into the wild in South Florida over the past three years. So far, results are indeterminate. Fewer than 250 exist in the wild, making it one of the rarest butterflies in North America.

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INS009-00059

The federally endangered Iowa Pleistocene Snail (Discus macclintocki). This is a relict from the last ice age, some 400,000 years ago. It lives in cold air vents on 37 different hillsides in Iowa (and one in Illinois) and survives only in the cold air that blows past underground ice and out of the cracks in limestone cliffs.

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INS009-00052

The federally endangered Iowa Pleistocene Snail (Discus macclintocki). This is a relict from the last ice age, some 400,000 years ago. It lives in cold air vents on 37 different hillsides in Iowa (and one in Illinois) and survives only in the cold air that blows past underground ice and out of the cracks in limestone cliffs.

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INS020-00001

A federally endangered Salt Creek tiger beetle (Cicindela nevadica lincolniana) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. With a count of fewer than 250 adults in the summer of 2007, this subspecies of tiger beetle could be the rarest insect in North America. Found only in the interior saline wetlands of Lancaster County, Nebraska, the beetle has been in decline for years due to habitat loss from development.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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