Photo

INS020-00002

A federally endangered Salt Creek tiger beetle (Cicindela nevadica lincolniana) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. With a count of fewer than 250 adults in the summer of 2007, this subspecies of tiger beetle could be the rarest insect in North America. Found only in the interior saline wetlands of Lancaster County, Nebraska, the beetle has been in decline for years due to habitat loss from development.

Photo

INS020-00003

A federally endangered Salt Creek tiger beetle (Cicindela nevadica lincolniana) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. With a count of fewer than 250 adults in the summer of 2007, this subspecies of tiger beetle could be the rarest insect in North America. Found only in the interior saline wetlands of Lancaster County, Nebraska, the beetle has been in decline for years due to habitat loss from development.

Photo

INS020-00004

A federally endangered Salt Creek tiger beetle (Cicindela nevadica lincolniana) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. With a count of fewer than 250 adults in the summer of 2007, this subspecies of tiger beetle could be the rarest insect in North America. Found only in the interior saline wetlands of Lancaster County, Nebraska, the beetle has been in decline for years due to habitat loss from development.

Photo

INS020-00005

A federally endangered Salt Creek tiger beetle (Cicindela nevadica lincolniana) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. With a count of fewer than 250 adults in the summer of 2007, this subspecies of tiger beetle could be the rarest insect in North America. Found only in the interior saline wetlands of Lancaster County, Nebraska, the beetle has been in decline for years due to habitat loss from development.

Photo

INS020-00007

A federally endangered Salt Creek tiger beetle (Cicindela nevadica lincolniana) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. With a count of fewer than 250 adults in the summer of 2007, this subspecies of tiger beetle could be the rarest insect in North America. Found only in the interior saline wetlands of Lancaster County, Nebraska, the beetle has been in decline for years due to habitat loss from development.

Photo

INS020-00010

A federally endangered Salt Creek tiger beetle (Cicindela nevadica lincolniana) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. With a count of fewer than 250 adults in the summer of 2007, this subspecies of tiger beetle could be the rarest insect in North America. Found only in the interior saline wetlands of Lancaster County, Nebraska, the beetle has been in decline for years due to habitat loss from development.

Photo

PLA031-00044

Harper’s beauty (Harperocallis flava), a critically imperiled plant from Florida, at the U.S. Botanical Garden Production Facility in Washington, DC.

Photo

PLA025-00022

The federally endangered koki’o ke’ oke’o (Hibiscus waimeae ssp. hannerae) at the U.S. Botanic Garden in Washington, DC.

Photo

PLA025-00017

A Hawaiian orange hibiscus (Hibiscus kokio subsp. saintjohnianus), at the U.S. Botanical Garden Production Facility, Washington, DC. Though restricted in range, this plant is not yet listed and there is uncertainty about whether it should or shouldn’t be listed.

Photo

ESA001-00593

A federally endangered Karner blue butterflies (Lycaeides melissa samuelis) in larva form , at the Toledo Zoological Gardens.

Photo

ESA001-00582

Federally endangered Mitchell’s satyr butterflies (Neonympha mitchellii mitchellii) at the Toledo Zoological Gardens.

Photo

ESA001-00584

Federally endangered Mitchell’s satyr butterflies (Neonympha mitchellii mitchellii) at the Toledo Zoological Gardens.

Photo

ESA001-00590

A federally endangered Karner blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa samuelis) at the Toledo Zoological Gardens.

Photo

ANI027-00493

An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Virgin Islands boa (Chilabothrus granti) at Toledo Zoo.

Photo

ANI027-00495

An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Virgin Islands boa (Chilabothrus granti) at Toledo Zoo.

Photo

FIS011-00226

Barrens topminnow (Fundulus julisia) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center. This species is endangered (IUCN). It is only found in the Barrens Plateau in middle Tennessee, making it one of the rarest fish in eastern North America.

Photo

FIS014-00003

Critically endangered (IUCN) Chucky madtom (Noturus crypticus), one of only 14 specimens ever to be collected, at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center. This fish has not been listed due to lack of funding even though it is one of the rarest fish in North America.

Photo

ESA001-00566

Cape Fear shiner (Notropis mekistocholas) an endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered species at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center.

Photo

ESA001-00572

Relict darter (Etheostoma chienense) a federally threatened species at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center.

Photo

ESA001-00471

A vulnerable (IUCN) and federally threatened Atlantic loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) at Riverbanks Zoo.

Photo

ESA001-00377

Fringed campion flowers (Silene polypetala), a federally endangered plant that’s native to rich hardwood forests of Georgia and Florida.

Photo

ESA001-00229

Federally threatened Decurrent false aster (Boltonia decurrens), at the Missouri Botanical Garden.

Photo

ESA001-00203

Chiricahua leopard frog (Lithobates chiricahuensis), a vulnerable (IUCN) and federally threatened species, at the Phoenix Zoo.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

Speaking Engagements

Joel is a popular keynote speaker with conservation, corporate, and civic groups.

Hire him to entertain and inspire your audience.

Book Joel To Speak

The Photo Ark

Joel is the founder of the Photo Ark, a groundbreaking effort to document every species in captivity before it’s too late.

Explore the Photo Ark

Visit Our Store

Every purchase goes directly to support our mission: getting the public to care and helping to save species from extinction.

Help Us Build the Ark