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A pair of critically endangered lemur leaf frogs (Agalychnis lemur) in amplexus, from the Panama, population, at the Atlanta Botanical Garden. The male is on top.

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A thick-tailed greater galago (Otolemur crassicaudatus) at the Tulsa Zoo.

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A critically endangered blue-eyed black lemur (Eulemur flavifrons) named “Presley” at the Duke Lemur Center. BEB lemurs are named here after blue-eyed actors and actresses. He has a twin sister named ‘Margret’, after Ann Margret. Only 61 are found in captivity worldwide, 21 of those in North America.

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A critically endangered blue-eyed black lemur (Eulemur flavifrons) named “Presley” at the Duke Lemur Center. BEB lemurs are named here after blue-eyed actors and actresses. He has a twin sister named ‘Margret’, after Ann Margret. Only 61 are found in captivity worldwide, 21 of those in North America.

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A critically endangered blue-eyed black lemur (Eulemur flavifrons) named “Presley” at the Duke Lemur Center. BEB lemurs are named here after blue-eyed actors and actresses. He has a twin sister named ‘Margret’, after Ann Margret. Only 61 are found in captivity worldwide, 21 of those in North America.

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A critically endangered blue-eyed black lemur (Eulemur flavifrons) named “Presley” at the Duke Lemur Center. BEB lemurs are named here after blue-eyed actors and actresses. He has a twin sister named ‘Margret’, after Ann Margret. Only 61 are found in captivity worldwide, 21 of those in North America.

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A critically endangered blue-eyed black lemur (Eulemur flavifrons) named “Poots” at the Duke Lemur Center. This animal is one of just three sexually active females in the U.S. Only 61 are found in captivity worldwide.

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A critically endangered blue-eyed black lemur (Eulemur flavifrons) named “Poots” at the Duke Lemur Center. This animal is one of just three sexually active females in the U.S. Only 61 are found in captivity worldwide.

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A critically endangered blue-eyed black lemur (Eulemur flavifrons) named “Poots” at the Duke Lemur Center. This animal is one of just three sexually active females in the U.S. Only 61 are found in captivity worldwide.

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A critically endangered blue-eyed black lemur (Eulemur flavifrons) named “Poots” at the Duke Lemur Center. This animal is one of just three sexually active females in the U.S. Only 61 are found in captivity worldwide.

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A critically endangered blue-eyed black lemur (Eulemur flavifrons) named “Poots” at the Duke Lemur Center. This animal is one of just three sexually active females in the U.S. Only 61 are found in captivity worldwide.

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A critically endangered blue-eyed black lemur (Eulemur flavifrons) named “Presley” at the Duke Lemur Center. BEB lemurs are named here after blue-eyed actors and actresses. He has a twin sister named ‘Margret’, after Ann Margret. Only 61 are found in captivity worldwide, 21 of those in North America.

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A critically endangered blue-eyed black lemur (Eulemur flavifrons) named “Presley” at the Duke Lemur Center. BEB lemurs are named here after blue-eyed actors and actresses. He has a twin sister named ‘Margret’, after Ann Margret. Only 61 are found in captivity worldwide, 21 of those in North America.

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A Spanish eagle owl (Bubo bubo hispanus) at the Palm Beach Zoo.

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A vulnerable pygmy slow loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus) at the Omaha Zoo.

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An endangered Coquerel’s sifaka (Propithecus coquereli) at the Houston Zoo.

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An endangered Coquerel’s sifaka (Propithecus coquereli) at the Houston Zoo.

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An endangered Coquerel’s sifaka (Propithecus coquereli) at the Houston Zoo.

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An endangered Coquerel’s sifaka (Propithecus coquereli) at the Houston Zoo.

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An endangered Coquerel’s sifaka (Propithecus coquereli) at the Houston Zoo.

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A tabby cat named Downtown at the Capital Humane Society in Lincoln.

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A brown tufted capuchin (Cebus apella apella) at the Rolling Hills Wildlife Adventure.

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Potto (Perodicticus potto) at the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo.

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Critically endangered (IUCN) Sulawesi macaques (Macaca nigra) at the Omaha Zoo.

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A federally endangered Key Largo wood rat (Neotoma floridana smalli) at Disney’s Animal Kingdom. Fewer than 250 adults are believed left in the wild, in just two parcels of public land on Key Largo. Captive breeding efforts are underway at both Disney’s Animal Kingdom and the Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa, thought the captive population still numbers less than 50 animals.

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A federally endangered Key Largo wood rat (Neotoma floridana smalli) at Disney’s Animal Kingdom. Fewer than 250 adults are believed left in the wild, in just two parcels of public land on Key Largo. Captive breeding efforts are underway at both Disney’s Animal Kingdom and the Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa, thought the captive population still numbers less than 50 animals.

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A federally threatened Northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) named Opal.

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A vulnerable (IUCN) and federally threatened polar bear (Ursus maritimus) at the Tulsa Zoo.

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A federally threatened Northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) named Opal.

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A federally threatened Northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) named Opal.

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A federally threatened Northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) named Opal.

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A federally threatened Northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) named Opal.

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A federally threatened Northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) named Opal.

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A federally threatened Northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) named Opal.

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A federally threatened Northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) named Opal.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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