Photo

ANI105-00143

A southwestern bobcat (Lynx rufus baileyi) at Southwest Wildlife Conservation Center.

Photo

ANI105-00142

A southwestern bobcat (Lynx rufus baileyi) at Southwest Wildlife Conservation Center.

Photo

ANI105-00141

A southwestern bobcat (Lynx rufus baileyi) at Southwest Wildlife Conservation Center.

Photo

ANI105-00140

A southwestern bobcat (Lynx rufus baileyi) at Southwest Wildlife Conservation Center.

Photo

ANI105-00133

A colocolo or pampas cat (Leopardus colocola garleppi) at Parque de las Leyendas in Lima, Peru.

Photo

ANI105-00132

A colocolo or pampas cat (Leopardus colocola garleppi) at Parque de las Leyendas in Lima, Peru.

Photo

ANI105-00131

A colocolo or pampas cat (Leopardus colocola garleppi) at Parque de las Leyendas in Lima, Peru.

Photo

ANI105-00130

A colocolo or pampas cat (Leopardus colocola garleppi) at Parque de las Leyendas in Lima, Peru.

Photo

ANI105-00129

A colocolo or pampas cat (Leopardus colocola garleppi) at Parque de las Leyendas in Lima, Peru.

Photo

ANI100-00132

A rusty-spotted cat (Prionailurus rubiginosus phillips) at the Exmoor Zoo in England. This is one of the smallest cat species in the world.

Photo

ANI100-00133

A rusty-spotted cat (Prionailurus rubiginosus phillips) at the Exmoor Zoo in England. This is one of the smallest cat species in the world.

Photo

ANI100-00127

A rusty-spotted cat (Prionailurus rubiginosus phillips) at the Exmoor Zoo in England. This is one of the smallest cat species in the world.

Photo

ANI100-00128

A rusty-spotted cat (Prionailurus rubiginosus phillips) at the Exmoor Zoo in England. This is one of the smallest cat species in the world.

Photo

ANI100-00131

A rusty-spotted cat (Prionailurus rubiginosus phillips) at the Exmoor Zoo in England. This is one of the smallest cat species in the world.

Photo

ANI100-00134

A rusty-spotted cat (Prionailurus rubiginosus phillips) at the Exmoor Zoo in England. This is one of the smallest cat species in the world.

Photo

ANI100-00130

A rusty-spotted cat (Prionailurus rubiginosus phillips) at the Exmoor Zoo in England. This is one of the smallest cat species in the world.

Photo

ANI100-00129

A rusty-spotted cat (Prionailurus rubiginosus phillips) at the Exmoor Zoo in England. This is one of the smallest cat species in the world.

Photo

ANI100-00126

A rusty-spotted cat (Prionailurus rubiginosus phillips) at the Exmoor Zoo in England. This is one of the smallest cat species in the world.

Photo

ANI105-00121

A margay (Leopardus wiedii yucatanensis) at Shaldon Wildlife Trust in Shaldon, England.

Photo

ANI105-00120

A margay (Leopardus wiedii yucatanensis) at Shaldon Wildlife Trust in Shaldon, England.

Photo

ANI085-00032

Studio portrait of a cat named Amadeus Wolfgang Meowzart.

Photo

ANI100-00098

A male guiña (Leopardus guigna guigna) from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile.

He has only three legs, having lost one in a trapper’s snare. He was brought here to be taken care of by the Chilean Wildlife Authority.

Despite the loss of his front leg, he moves around well and has a good life here at Fauna Andina, a wildlife conservation and research center in Chile. Their goal is to protect wildlife through study and, captive breeding and release back into the wild.

The guiña has the smallest distribution of any wild cat on the planet. This makes it very susceptible to being endangered.

The Fauna Andina conservation center near is the only known center that’s ever bred this species in captivity.

Photo

ANI100-00097

A male guiña (Leopardus guigna guigna) from Fauna Andina in central-south Chile.

He has only three legs, having lost one in a trapper’s snare. He was brought here to be taken care of by the Chilean Wildlife Authority.

Despite the loss of his front leg, he moves around well and has a good life here at Fauna Andina, a wildlife conservation and research center in Chile. Their goal is to protect wildlife through study and, captive breeding and release back into the wild.

The guiña has the smallest distribution of any wild cat on the planet. This makes it very susceptible to being endangered.

The Fauna Andina conservation center near is the only known center that’s ever bred this species in captivity.

Photo

ANI100-00096

A male guiña (Leopardus guigna guigna) from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile.

He has only three legs, having lost one in a trapper’s snare. He was brought here to be taken care of by the Chilean Wildlife Authority.

Despite the loss of his front leg, he moves around well and has a good life here at Fauna Andina, a wildlife conservation and research center in Chile. Their goal is to protect wildlife through study and, captive breeding and release back into the wild.

The guiña has the smallest distribution of any wild cat on the planet. This makes it very susceptible to being endangered.

The Fauna Andina conservation center near is the only known center that’s ever bred this species in captivity.

Photo

ANI100-00095

A male guiña (Leopardus guigna guigna) from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile.

He has only three legs, having lost one in a trapper’s snare. He was brought here to be taken care of by the Chilean Wildlife Authority.

Despite the loss of his front leg, he moves around well and has a good life here at Fauna Andina, a wildlife conservation and research center in Chile. Their goal is to protect wildlife through study and, captive breeding and release back into the wild.

The guiña has the smallest distribution of any wild cat on the planet. This makes it very susceptible to being endangered.

The Fauna Andina conservation center near is the only known center that’s ever bred this species in captivity.

Photo

ANI100-00094

A male guiña (Leopardus guigna guigna) from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile.

He has only three legs, having lost one in a trapper’s snare. He was brought here to be taken care of by the Chilean Wildlife Authority.

Despite the loss of his front leg, he moves around well and has a good life here at Fauna Andina, a wildlife conservation and research center in Chile. Their goal is to protect wildlife through study and, captive breeding and release back into the wild.

The guiña has the smallest distribution of any wild cat on the planet. This makes it very susceptible to being endangered.

The Fauna Andina conservation center near is the only known center that’s ever bred this species in captivity.

Photo

ANI100-00093

A male guiña (Leopardus guigna guigna) from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile.

He has only three legs, having lost one in a trapper’s snare. He was brought here to be taken care of by the Chilean Wildlife Authority.

Despite the loss of his front leg, he moves around well and has a good life here at Fauna Andina, a wildlife conservation and research center in Chile. Their goal is to protect wildlife through study and, captive breeding and release back into the wild.

The guiña has the smallest distribution of any wild cat on the planet. This makes it very susceptible to being endangered.

The Fauna Andina conservation center near is the only known center that’s ever bred this species in captivity.

Photo

ANI100-00092

A guiña (Leopardus guigna tigrillo) whose name is Pikumche from Fauna Andinain central-south, Chile. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN red list.

Photo

ANI100-00091

A guiña (Leopardus guigna tigrillo) whose name is Pikumche from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN red list.

Photo

ANI100-00090

A guiña (Leopardus guigna tigrillo) whose name is Pikumche from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN red list.

Photo

ANI100-00089

A guiña (Leopardus guigna tigrillo) whose name is Pikumche from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN red list.

Photo

ANI100-00088

A guiña (Leopardus guigna tigrillo) whose name is Pikumche from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN red list.

Photo

ANI100-00087

A guiña (Leopardus guigna tigrillo) whose name is Pikumche from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN red list.

Photo

ANI019-00219

An endangered Malayan tiger (Panthera tigris jacksoni) at the Omaha Zoo.

Photo

ANI019-00279

A North American mountain lion (Puma concolor couguar), at the Rolling Hills Wildlife Adventure near Salina, KS

Photo

ANI019-00599

A Central American margay (Leopardus wiedii nicaraguae) at Tierpark Berlin. This species is listed as near threatened on the IUCN Red List.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

Speaking Engagements

Joel is a popular keynote speaker with conservation, corporate, and civic groups.

Hire him to entertain and inspire your audience.

Book Joel To Speak

The Photo Ark

Joel is the founder of the Photo Ark, a groundbreaking effort to document every species in captivity before it’s too late.

Explore the Photo Ark

Visit Our Store

Every purchase goes directly to support our mission: getting the public to care and helping to save species from extinction.

Help Us Build the Ark