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A common whitetail skimmer dragonfly (Libellula lydia) at Crosslake, MN.

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A common whitetail skimmer dragonfly (Libellula lydia) at Crosslake, MN.

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Workers sweep up lake flies that swarmed the lodge and died.

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Lovebugs (Plecia nearctica) collected from the wild near Gainesville, Florida.

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Lovebugs (Plecia nearctica) collected from the wild near Gainesville, Florida.

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El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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An entomologist scouts for El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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Joel Sartore prepares to photograph El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). With fewer than 100 individuals left on Earth, this species is as close to extinction as you can get. This animal was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population was discovered in the early 2000s.

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An entomologist scouts for El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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An entomologist scouts for El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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An entomologist searches for a federally endangered Delhi Sands flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus abdominalis). With fewer than 1,000 individuals left, this is the only fly to be federally listed.

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An entomologist carefully walks through the habitat of the federally endangered Delhi Sands flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus abdominalis). With fewer than 1,000 individuals left, this is the only fly to be federally listed.

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A federally endangered Delhi Sands flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus abdominalis). With fewer than 1,000 individuals left, this is the only fly to be federally listed.

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A federally endangered Delhi Sands flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus abdominalis). With fewer than 1,000 individuals left, this is the only fly to be federally listed.

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A federally endangered Delhi Sands flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus abdominalis). With fewer than 1,000 individuals left, this is the only fly to be federally listed.

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The habitat of the federally endangered Delhi Sands flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus abdominalis). With fewer than 1,000 individuals left, this is the only fly to be federally listed.

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A federally endangered Delhi Sands flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus abdominalis). With fewer than 1,000 individuals left, this is the only fly to be federally listed.

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A federally endangered Delhi Sands flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus abdominalis). With fewer than 1,000 individuals left, this is the only fly to be federally listed.

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Images of a blooming Stern’s medlar (Mespilus canescens), one of the rarest plants in the U.S. This plant is now reduced to just 25 specimens in two locations. This one is located on the grounds of the Missouri Botanical Gardens.

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Images of a blooming Stern’s medlar (Mespilus canescens), one of the rarest plants in the U.S. This plant is now reduced to just 25 specimens in two locations. This one is located on the grounds of the Missouri Botanical Gardens.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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