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Indian star tortoises (Geochelone elegans) at the Taronga Zoo.

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Indian star tortoises (Geochelone elegans) at the Taronga Zoo.

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Indian star tortoises (Geochelone elegans) at the Taronga Zoo.

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Indian star tortoises (Geochelone elegans) at the Taronga Zoo.

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Silkie and buff orpington chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) in Lincoln, Nebraska.

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Silkie and buff orpington chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) in Lincoln, Nebraska.

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Yellowtail demoiselle fish (Neopomacentrus azysron) at Nebraska Aquatic Supply.

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Indian star tortoises (Geochelone elegans) at the Taronga Zoo in Sydney, Australia.

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Blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, at the Sedge Island Natural Resource Education Center in the Sedge Islands Marine Conservation Zone, Barnegat Bay, New Jersey.

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Organically raised pigs on a farm near Palmyra, Nebraska.

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Cheyenne Mountain Zoo is home to the world’s most prolific captive reticulated giraffe herd with 197 births at the Zoo since 1954, when giraffes were introduced to the Zoo’s animal collection. Cheyenne Mountain Zoo currently has 21 reticulated giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis reticulata) in the herd, making it the largest captive giraffe herd in North America.

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Dall sheep in Denali National Park in Alaska’s Interior.

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Brahminy blind snakes (Ramphotyphlops braminus) at Cape Canaveral.

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Brahminy blind snakes (Ramphotyphlops braminus) at Cape Canaveral.

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A group of eastern tiger salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum tigrinum) at the Caldwell Zoo in Tyler, Texas.

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A group of eastern tiger salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum tigrinum) at the Caldwell Zoo in Tyler, Texas.

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Common river frogs (Amietia angolensis) collected during the Bioblitz in the Mt. Gorongosa area.

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Natal multimammate mice (Mastomys natalensis), trapped during the bioblitz, seem almost to be plotting their escape. Two of them had in fact disappeared into tall grass before a photograph could be taken. A couple of local kids ran into the field and came back with the mice in hand just a few moments later. Residents of Mount Gorongosa often hunt rodents for food.

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Federally endangered Iowa Pleistocene Snails, Discus macclintocki.

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A striated heron, Butorides striata, on Floreana Island in Galapagos National Park.

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A row of critically endangered ploughshare tortoises (Astrochelys yniphora) at Zoo Atlanta. These animals were confiscated after being stolen. They are valued at about $10,000 each.

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Brown-and-yellow flower beetles (Pachnoda sinuata flaviventris) at the Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo.

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Larval stage of the atlas beetle (Chalcosoma atlas) at the Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo. When grown into an adult, this type of beetle is able to lift 850 times its own body weight making it the strongest animal on earth compared to its body weight.

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A zookeeper holds two larva of the atlas beetle (Chalcosoma atlas) at the Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo.When grown into an adult, this type of beetle is able to lift 850 times its own body weight making it the strongest animal on earth compared to its body weight.

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Pupal stage of the atlas beetle (Chalcosoma atlas) at the Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo. When grown into an adult, this type of beetle is able to lift 850 times its own body weight making it the strongest animal on earth compared to its body weight.

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A male Atlas beetle (Chalcosoma atlas) and a female (smaller, hornless) at the Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo. This type of beetle is able to lift 850 times its own body weight making it the strongest animal on earth compared to its body weight.

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A blue death-feigning beetle (Asboulus verrucosus) at the Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo.

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Sam and her partner Craig Coupland hand raise four orphaned koala babies in Ormiston, Australia. The couple has been working with orphans for five years. Young koalas take more work and care than human babies, but Longman says the animals are part of the family.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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