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Marsh frog (Pelophylax ridibundus) at the Plzen Zoo in the Czech Republic.

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Red-eyed tree frog (Agalychnis callidryas) at the Miller Park Zoo. These frogs sit completely still all day long and blend in with the surrounding leaves. They have the ability to change the green tint of their skin to make it harder for predators to see them.

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ANI101-00198

Red-eyed tree frog (Agalychnis callidryas) at the Miller Park Zoo. These frogs sit completely still all day long and blend in with the surrounding leaves. They have the ability to change the green tint of their skin to make it harder for predators to see them.

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ANI101-00199

Red-eyed tree frog (Agalychnis callidryas) at the Miller Park Zoo. These frogs sit completely still all day long and blend in with the surrounding leaves. They have the ability to change the green tint of their skin to make it harder for predators to see them.

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ANI101-00192

Treasury Island tree frog (Litoria thesaurensis) at the Plzen Zoo in Plzen, Czech Republic.

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Madagascar frog (Heterixalus alboguttatus) at the Plzen Zoo in Plzen, Czech Republic.

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Madagascar frog (Heterixalus alboguttatus) at the Plzen Zoo in Plzen, Czech Republic.

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Treasury Island tree frog (Litoria thesaurensis) at the Plzen Zoo in Plzen, Czech Republic.

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Juvenile American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeiana) at Jurong Bird Park, part of Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

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Juvenile American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeiana) at Jurong Bird Park, part of Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

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A Fort Randolph robber frog (Pristimantis gaigei) at the Atlanta Botanical Garden.

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A Fort Randolph robber frog (Pristimantis gaigei) at the Atlanta Botanical Garden.

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Gliding tree frog (Agalychnis spurrelli) from the Atlanta Botanical Garden.

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Gliding tree frog (Agalychnis spurrelli) from the Atlanta Botanical Garden.

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An adult fringe tree frog (Cruziohyla craspedopus) from the Atlanta Botanical Garden.

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A juvenile fringe tree frog (Cruziohyla craspedopus) from the Atlanta Botanical Garden.

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A Fort Randolph robber frog (Pristimantis gaigei) at the Atlanta Botanical Garden.

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A critically endangered, female Pirre harlequin frog (Atelopus glyphus,) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chrytrid fungus.

This species is highly susceptible to the fungus, so it has been brought in for captive breeding.

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ANI101-00180

A robber frog species (in the craugastor punctariolus series) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chrytrid fungus.

Shown are a female (larger) and a male.
This species is thought to be down to just two males and single female. Despite very intensive searches, the last wild individuals were seen in the wild in 2010.

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The underside of a robber frog species (in the craugastor punctariolus series) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chrytrid fungus.

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A male robber frog (in the Craugastor punctariolus series) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

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ANI101-00177

A robber frog (in the Craugastor punctariolus series) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

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ANI101-00178

A male robber frog (in the Craugastor punctariolus series) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

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ANI101-00167

Chevron patter color morph of the Limosa harlequin frog (Atelopus limosus) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. The male is smaller than the female. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

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Chevron patter color morph of the Limosa harlequin frog (Atelopus limosus) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. The male is smaller than the female. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

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ANI101-00169

Chevron patter color morph of the Limosa harlequin frog (Atelopus limosus) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. The male is smaller than the female. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

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ANI101-00170

Geminisa’s dart frog (Andinobates geminisae) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project.

This species occurs in a limited distribution in central Panama.

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Vicente’s poison frog (Oophaga vicentei) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

This is an arboreal species from a restricted habitat in central Panama. They have such a small distribution because of rainforest destruction.

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ANI101-00172

A critically endangered, female Pirre harlequin frog (Atelopus glyphus,) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

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ANI101-00173

Endangered female and male toad mountain harlequin frogs (Atelopus certus) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

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ANI101-00174

Endangered male and female toad mountain harlequin frogs (Atelopus certus) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

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ANI101-00175

An endangered female toad mountain harlequin frog (Atelopus certus) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

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ANI101-00161

The critically endangered, Pirre harlequin frog (Atelopus glyphus) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. The male is smaller. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

The male is smaller and darker with small yellow spots.

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ANI101-00162

The critically endangered, Pirre harlequin frog (Atelopus glyphus) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. The male is smaller. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

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ANI101-00163

The critically endangered, Pirre harlequin frog (Atelopus glyphus) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. The male is smaller. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

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ANI101-00164

Brown color morph of the Limosa harlequin frog (Atelopus limosus) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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