Dear Friends: We are still open for business, but it might take longer to fill your orders and requests as we have shifted to minimal staffing as a precaution against COVID-19. We appreciate your patience.

Photo

BIR070-00096

A black-banded owl (Ciccaba huhula huhula) at Mantenedor da Fauna Silvestre Cariuá.

Photo

BIR070-00095

A black-banded owl (Ciccaba huhula huhula) at Mantenedor da Fauna Silvestre Cariuá.

Photo

BIR070-00094

A black-banded owl (Ciccaba huhula huhula) at Mantenedor da Fauna Silvestre Cariuá.

Photo

BIR070-00093

A black-banded owl (Ciccaba huhula huhula) at Mantenedor da Fauna Silvestre Cariuá.

Photo

ANI108-00063

An endangered gray woolly monkey (Lagothrix cana) at Mantenedor da Fauna Silvestre Cariuá. This animal is named Prince William.

Photo

ANI108-00062

An endangered gray woolly monkey (Lagothrix cana) at Mantenedor da Fauna Silvestre Cariuá. This animal is named Prince William.

Photo

ANI108-00061

An endangered gray woolly monkey (Lagothrix cana) at Mantenedor da Fauna Silvestre Cariuá. This animal is named Prince William.

Photo

ANI108-00056

A female Venezuelan red howler monkey (Alouatta seniculus juara) at Mantenedor da Fauna Silvestre Cariuá. This animal is named Ella.

Photo

ANI107-00069

A Hoffmann’s two-toed sloth (Choloepus hoffmanni capitalis) at Zoologico de Quito.

Photo

ANI107-00065

A Linne’s two-toed sloth (Choloepus didactylus) at Zoologico de Quito.

Photo

ANI107-00064

A Linne’s two-toed sloth (Choloepus didactylus) at Zoologico de Quito.

Photo

ANI107-00063

A Linne’s two-toed sloth (Choloepus didactylus) at Zoologico de Quito.

Photo

ANI105-00115

A margay (Leopardus wiedii pirrensis) named Diego, at Zoologico de Quito.

Photo

ANI110-00143

Juliet, a Sehuencas water frog (Telmatobius yuracare) at Museo De Historia Natural Alcide d’Orbigny, a natural history museum and rare amphibian breeding center in Chocabamba Bolivia. A single lone male of this species, named ‘Romeo’ had been thought to be the very last of his kind until she and four other animals were discovered in December of 2018.

Photo

ANI110-00142

A critically endangered giant water frog (Telmatobius gigas) collected near Oruro, Bolivia, photographed at at Museo De Historia Natural Alcide d’Orbigny, a natural history museum and rare amphibian breeding center in Chocabamba Bolivia. This species is totally aquatic. The name gigas means ‘big’, and refers to the giant tadpoles of this species, not the adults.

Photo

ANI110-00141

A critically endangered giant water frog (Telmatobius gigas) collected near Oruro, Bolivia, photographed at at Museo De Historia Natural Alcide d’Orbigny, a natural history museum and rare amphibian breeding center in Chocabamba Bolivia. This species is totally aquatic. The name gigas means ‘big’, and refers to the giant tadpoles of this species, not the adults.

Photo

ANI110-00134

An undescribed Telmatobius sp., a new species of water frog from Potosi, Bolivia photographed at at Museo De Historia Natural Alcide d’Orbigny, a natural history museum and rare amphibian breeding center in Chocabamba Bolivia. This species is totally aquatic.

Photo

ANI110-00132

Romeo, a ten-year-old Sehuencas water frog (Telmatobius yuracare) at Museo De Historia Natural Alcide d’Orbigny, a natural history museum and rare amphibian breeding center in Chocabamba Bolivia. Romeo had been thought to be the very last of his kind until a female named Juliet and four other animals were discovered in December of 2018.

Photo

BIR069-00148

A female true silver pheasant (Lophura nycthemera nycthemera) from a private collection.

Photo

BIR024-00244

A white-tailed hawk (Geranoaetus albicaudatus colonus) at the Membeca Lagos Farm, near Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Photo

BIR070-00085

A spectacled owl (Pulsatrix perspicillata perspicillata) at Cetas-IBAMA, a wildlife rehab center in Manaus, Brazil. This is administered by IBAMA, the government wildlife agency of Brazil.

Photo

ANI108-00047

A juvenile large-headed capuchin monkey (Sapajus macrocephalus) from the Coari area of Amazona, Brazil. Photograhed at Cetas-IBAMA, a wildlife rehab center in Manaus, Brazil. This is administered by IBAMA, the government wildlife agency of Brazil.

Photo

ANI108-00039

A critically endangered pied tamarin (Saguinus bicolor) at Cetas-IBAMA, a wildlife rehab center in Manaus, Brazil. This is administered by IBAMA, the government wildlife agency of Brazil.

Photo

BIR070-00083

A rusty-barred owl, Strix hylophila, at Tierpark Berlin.

Photo

BIR070-00081

A rusty-barred owl, Strix hylophila, at Tierpark Berlin.

Photo

BIR070-00079

A spot-bellied eagle owl (Bubo nipalensis blighi) at Tierpark Berlin.

Photo

ANI033-00229

An elliptical waterbuck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus ellipsiprymnus) at Tierpark Berlin.

Photo

ANI033-00228

An elliptical waterbuck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus ellipsiprymnus) at Tierpark Berlin.

Photo

ANI023-00235

An endangered male Persian fallow deer (Dama mesopotamica) at Tierpark Berlin.

Photo

ANI004-00151

A pair of pallid foxes (Vulpes pallida) at Cub Creek Science Camp in Rolla, MO. The female on the left is named Pallida and the male on the right in named Gadget.

This species is not well-studied. They come from Sub-Saharan Africa. Their large ears not only assist with hearing prey and threats, but serve to regulate their body temperature.

Cub Creek Science Camp is a residential animal and science summer camp located in central Missouri. Here children from all over the world come to learn about the Earth’s creatures and to gain an appreciation for science and nature.

Photo

ANI004-00150

A pair of pallid foxes (Vulpes pallida) at Cub Creek Science Camp in Rolla, MO. The female on the left is named Pallida and the male on the right in named Gadget.

This species is not well-studied. They come from Sub-Saharan Africa. Their large ears not only assist with hearing prey and threats, but serve to regulate their body temperature.

Cub Creek Science Camp is a residential animal and science summer camp located in central Missouri. Here children from all over the world come to learn about the Earth’s creatures and to gain an appreciation for science and nature.

Photo

ANI004-00149

A pair of pallid foxes (Vulpes pallida) at Cub Creek Science Camp in Rolla, MO. The female in the front is named Pallida and the male in the back in named Gadget.

This species of fox comes from Sub-Saharan Africa. Their large ears not only assist with hearing prey and threats, but serve to regulate their body temperature.

Cub Creek Science Camp is a residential animal and science summer camp located in central Missouri. Here children from all over the world come to learn about the Earth’s creatures and to gain an appreciation for science and nature.

Photo

ANI110-00114

A Prince Charles stream frog (Hyloscirtus princecharlesi) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal was originally from Aloag – Tandapi Road, Pichincha Province, Ecuador.

Photo

ANI110-00112

A common Suriname toad (Pipa pipa) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal was originally from Shiripuno, Orellana Province, Ecuador.

Photo

ANI110-00089

A pacific toad (Ceratophrys stolzmanni) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Reserva Ecologica militar Arenillas, El Oro Province, Ecuador.
This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN. It is a rare species in nature and little known due to its biology. It is active only in the rainy season. However, Ecuadorian populations may be declining as a result of the destruction and fragmentation of dry coastal forests, urban growth, the use of agrochemicals.

Photo

ANI110-00086

A Spurrell leaf frog (Agalychnis spurrelli) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Otokiki – Alto Tambo, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

Speaking Engagements

Joel is a popular keynote speaker with conservation, corporate, and civic groups.

Hire him to entertain and inspire your audience.

Book Joel To Speak

The Photo Ark

Joel is the founder of the Photo Ark, a groundbreaking effort to document every species in captivity before it’s too late.

Explore the Photo Ark

Visit Our Store

Every purchase goes directly to support our mission: getting the public to care and helping to save species from extinction.

Help Us Build the Ark