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INS006-00339

Trinidad dwarf tiger, Cyriocosmus elegans, at the Moscow Zoo.

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BIR040-00118

A white-tailed hawk (Geranoaetus albicaudatus hypospodius) at SIA, the Comanche Nation Ethno-Ornithological Initiative.

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BIR040-00115

A white-tailed hawk (Geranoaetus albicaudatus hypospodius) at SIA, the Comanche Nation Ethno-Ornithological Initiative.

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BIR025-00348

Spotted eagle owl (Bubo africanus) from the Plzen Zoo in the Czech Republic.

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BIR025-00350

Spotted eagle owl (Bubo africanus) from Plzen Zoo in the Czech Republic.

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BIR025-00341

Eurasian eagle owl (Bubo bubo omissus) at the Plzen Zoo in the Czech Republic.

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BIR059-00083

A Peruvian thick-knee, Burhinus superciliaris, at the Miller Park Zoo.

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ANI062-00312

Llamas, Lama glama, after a recent summer haircut at the Lincoln Children’s Zoo

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ANI062-00313

Llamas, Lama glama, after a recent summer haircut at the Lincoln Children’s Zoo

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BIR039-00050

Red-cheeked cordon-bleu finch (Uraeginthus bengalus brunneigularis) from a private collection.

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BIR003-00439

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

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BIR003-00440

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

Photo

BIR003-00441

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

Photo

BIR003-00442

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

Photo

BIR003-00443

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

Photo

BIR003-00444

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

Photo

BIR003-00435

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

Photo

BIR003-00436

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

Photo

BIR003-00437

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

Photo

BIR003-00438

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

Photo

ANI077-00391

A panamint rattlesnake (Crotalus mitchellii stephensi) at The Living Desert in Palm Desert, California.

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ANI077-00388

A panamint rattlesnake (Crotalus mitchellii stephensi) at The Living Desert in Palm Desert, California.

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ANI012-00229

A Key Largo woodrat (Neotoma floridana) (US: Endangered) at Disney’s Animal Kingdom. Fewer than 250 adults are believed left in the wild, in just two parcels of public land on Key Largo. Captive breeding efforts are underway at both Disney’s Animal Kingdom and the Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa, thought the captive population still numbers less than 50 animals.

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ANI082-00040

Army soldiers doing training exercises at Fort Hood in Killeen, Texas.

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ESA001-00152

A Key Largo woodrat (Neotoma floridana) (US: Endangered) at Disney’s Animal Kingdom. Fewer than 250 adults are believed left in the wild, in just two parcels of public land on Key Largo. Captive breeding efforts are underway at both Disney’s Animal Kingdom and the Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa, thought the captive population still numbers less than 50 animals.

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ANI031-00101

Bryn, the federally endangered Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), sat for this portrait in 2007 at the Oregon Zoo in Portland, Oregon. She was one of two female Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits left, the end of the line for this species of animals. Since there are no males left, this means only animals intercrossed with the Idaho race will survive. She died in 2008, marking the end of her genetic line. This subpopulation lost its sagebrush habitat as the land was developed for agriculture in the state of Washington.

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ANI031-00102

Bryn, the federally endangered Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), sat for this portrait in 2007 at the Oregon Zoo in Portland, Oregon. She was one of two female Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits left, the end of the line for this species of animals. Since there are no males left, this means only animals intercrossed with the Idaho race will survive. She died in 2008, marking the end of her genetic line. This subpopulation lost its sagebrush habitat as the land was developed for agriculture in the state of Washington.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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