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ANI014-00174

A female fringe-lipped bat, Trachops cirrhosus. Also sometimes known as the frog-eating bat. The function of the mouth tubercles are a mystery. Its long been hypothesized that they are used for chemo-reception, that the bat can fly over a frog or toad and just brush its skin with its lips, thus very quickly (and non-lethally) assess the palatability of its prey. Nobody knows for sure though.

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ANI014-00170

A female fringe-lipped bat, Trachops cirrhosus, at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute.

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BIR059-00006

A white-naped jacobin hummingbird (Florisuga mellivora) from the wild in Gamboa, Panama.

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BIR059-00003

White-naped jacobin hummingbirds (Florisuga mellivora) from the wild in Gamboa, Panama.

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BIR059-00004

A white-naped jacobin hummingbird (Florisuga mellivora) from the wild in Gamboa, Panama.

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BIR059-00005

A white-naped jacobin hummingbird (Florisuga mellivora) from the wild in Gamboa, Panama.

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ANI078-00500

An extinct splendid poison frog (Oophaga speciosa) preserved in alcohol at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Gamboa, Panama.

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ANI078-00501

Extinct Chiriqui harlequin frogs (Atelopus chiriquiensis) preserved in alcohol at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Gamboa, Panama.

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ANI078-00502

Two extinct frog species, a Chiriqui harlequin frog (Atelopus chiriquiensis) and a splendid poison frog (Oophaga speciosa) at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Gamboa, Panama.

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ANI078-00503

A man checks on the frogs at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Gamboa, Panama.

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ANI078-00499

Hundreds of endangered Toad Mountain harlequin froglets (Atelopus certus) explore their new home inside a plexiglass rearing tank at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Gamboa, Panama. The outside of the tank is covered in transparent labels, each indicating the date the froglets emerged from the water, as well as their parentage.

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INS012-00030

A male katydid (Chloroscirtus discocercus), which was caught in the wild in Gamboa, Panama.

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INS012-00031

A male katydid (Chloroscirtus discocercus), which was caught in the wild in Gamboa, Panama.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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