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ANI040-00431

An endangered silvery Javan gibbon (Hylobates moloch) at the Gibbon Conservation Center.

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ANI040-00430

An endangered silvery Javan gibbon (Hylobates moloch) at the Gibbon Conservation Center.

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ANI040-00429

A vulnerable male Eastern hoolock gibbon (Hoolock leuconedys) at the Gibbon Conservation Center.

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ANI040-00428

A vulnerable male and female Eastern hoolock gibbon (Hoolock leuconedys) at the Gibbon Conservation Center.

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ANI040-00427

A vulnerable female Eastern hoolock gibbon (Hoolock leuconedys) at the Gibbon Conservation Center.

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ANI040-00426

A vulnerable male and female Eastern hoolock gibbon (Hoolock leuconedys) at the Gibbon Conservation Center.

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ANI040-00411

A male and female endangered Western hoolock gibbon (Hoolock hoolock) at the Assam State Zoo cum Botanical Garden.

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ANI099-00101

An endangered male yellow cheeked gibbon (Nomascus gabriellae) at the Singapore Zoo.

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ANI099-00102

An endangered female yellow-cheeked gibbon (Nomascus gabriellae) at the Singapore Zoo.

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ANI099-00100

An endangered male yellow cheeked gibbon (Nomascus gabriellae) at the Singapore Zoo.

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ANI099-00060

A male, endangered Western hoolock gibbon (Hoolock hoolock) at the Assam State Zoo cum Botanical Garden.

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ANI099-00061

A female, endangered Western hoolock gibbon (Hoolock hoolock) at the Assam State Zoo cum Botanical Garden.

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ONA007-00140

Tilo Nadler with a rare gibbon at the Endangered Primate Rescue Center in Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam.

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ESA002-00460

An endangered lar gibbon (Hylobates lar) at the Gladys Porter Zoo in Brownsville, Texas.

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ANI040-00308

An endangered male southern white-cheeked gibbon (Nomascus siki) named ‘Jonas’ at the Endangered Primate Rescue Center in Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam. All of the animals here are either confiscations from the pet or bush meat/medicine trade, or were born here.

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ANI040-00309

An endangered male southern white-cheeked gibbon (Nomascus siki) named ‘Jonas’ at the Endangered Primate Rescue Center in Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam. All of the animals here are either confiscations from the pet or bush meat/medicine trade, or were born here.

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ANI040-00310

An endangered male southern white-cheeked gibbon (Nomascus siki) named ‘Jonas’ at the Endangered Primate Rescue Center in Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam. All of the animals here are either confiscations from the pet or bush meat/medicine trade, or were born here.

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ANI040-00311

An endangered male southern white-cheeked gibbon (Nomascus siki) named ‘Jonas’ at the Endangered Primate Rescue Center in Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam. All of the animals here are either confiscations from the pet or bush meat/medicine trade, or were born here.

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BIR003-00428

A flock of migrating federally endangered Sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary in Gibbon, Nebraska.

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ESA002-00305

A critically endangered male and female white-cheeked gibbon(Nomascus leucogenys) at the Gladys Porter Zoo. The male has a black coloration and the female has a blonde coloration.

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ESA002-00306

An endangered white-handed gibbon (Hylobates lar) at the Gladys Porter Zoo.

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ESA002-00134

The endangered grey gibbon (Hylobates muelleri muelleri) may not be seen in captivity much longer. There are now too few in captivity to keep their population sustained and too few in the wild to bring more in. With limited space and funding, zoos must make hard choices every year in deciding which species to breed and which to let go, or ‘phase out’.

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ESA002-00135

The endangered grey gibbon (Hylobates muelleri muelleri) may not be seen in captivity much longer. There are now too few in captivity to keep their population sustained and too few in the wild to bring more in. With limited space and funding, zoos must make hard choices every year in deciding which species to breed and which to let go, or ‘phase out’.

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ESA002-00136

The endangered grey gibbon (Hylobates muelleri muelleri) may not be seen in captivity much longer. There are now too few in captivity to keep their population sustained and too few in the wild to bring more in. With limited space and funding, zoos must make hard choices every year in deciding which species to breed and which to let go, or ‘phase out’.

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ANI040-00140

In vogue no more, the endangered grey gibbon (Hylobates muelleri muelleri) will not be seen in captivity much longer. There are now too few in captivity to keep their population sustained and too few in the wild to bring more in. With limited space and funding, zoos must make hard choices every year in deciding which species to breed and which to let go, or ‘phase out’. Often zoos go with more showy species of primate to propagate, leaving the fate of the more drab species in question.

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ANI082-00020

Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

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ANI082-00021

Sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) kettling over the Platte River, near the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary in Gibbon, Nebraska.

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ANI082-00022

Sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) in flight over the Platte River near the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary in Gibbon, Nebraska.

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ANI082-00023

Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

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ANI082-00014

Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River, forming living sandbars, during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

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ANI082-00015

Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

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ANI082-00016

Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

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ANI082-00017

Sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) in flight over the Platte River near the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary in Gibbon, Nebraska.

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ANI082-00002

Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

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ANI082-00018

Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

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ANI082-00003

Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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