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Cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) flying into their mud nests under a county bridge near Raymond, Nebraska.

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A mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) walks along a mountain in Glacier National Park, Montana.

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A female bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) is caught by biologists using a mist net, near Wood River, Nebraska. Avian ecologists trap and put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, on male bobolinks. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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Biologists tag a male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) in Nebraska. They will put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, the birds’ backs. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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A grasshopper sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum) nest is well camouflaged in the thick prairie grasses along the Platte River near Wood River, Nebraska.

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A male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) near Wood River, Nebraska.

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A biologist holds a male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus), captured for a study near Wood River, Nebraska. They will put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, the birds’ backs. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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Biologists capture a male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) near Wood River, Nebraska. They will put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, the birds’ backs. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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Biologists capture a male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) near Wood River, Nebraska. They will put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, the birds’ backs. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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Workers from Southern Native Plants out of Milton, Florida planting sea oats (Uniola paniculata) on a newly created sand dune to protect Dauphin Island, Alabama from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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An aerial of heavily oiled marshlands surrounded by oil booms in Barataria Bay, Louisiana.

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A close up of white cottongrass (Eriphorum scheuchzeri) growing on the tundra near Deadhorse, Alaska.

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A protest cemetery dedicated to all the things lost because of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on Grand Isle, Louisiana.

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A crew of BP contractors attempt to siphon oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill out of a marsh in the Gulf of Mexico.

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Massive amounts of oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill ring the outer edges of a marsh near the mouth of the Mississippi river in Louisiana.

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Crude oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill coats marshes on a barrier island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. Once oiled this heavily, marsh grasses will die.

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Crude oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill coats marshes on a barrier island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. Once oiled this heavily, marsh grasses will die.

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A brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis), covered with oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, on Queen Bess Island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. The bird was taken to a rehab center.

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A failed boom lies washed up in a marsh, showing the effects of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

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A BP clean up crew tries to sop oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill at Queen Bess Island, Louisiana.

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A cattle guard being installed at a pasture near Valparaiso, Nebraska.

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A sister and brother ride together on an ATV at their farmhouse in Dunbar, Nebraska.

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A young boy poses for a photograph while on vacation in Crosslake, Minnesota.

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Two white tail deer (Odocoileus virginianus) standing along the Steamboat Trace trail near Nebraska City, Nebraska.

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A garter snake (Thamnophis sp.) near the Steamboat Trace trail between Nebraska City and Peru, Nebraska.

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A garter snake (Thamnophis sp.) near the Steamboat Trace trail between Nebraska City and Peru, Nebraska.

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A garter snake (Thamnophis sp.) near the Steamboat Trace trail between Nebraska City and Peru, Nebraska.

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A mother and father with their two sons in rural southeastern Nebraska.

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A mother and father with their two sons in rural southeastern Nebraska.

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A mother and her son sit on the porch at a Nebraska farmhouse.

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A husband and wife stop for a portrait in rural southeastern Nebraska.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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