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Wolf biologist David Mech tracks reintroduced gray wolves in Yellowstone National Park.

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For fear she and her pack might harm cattle, Opal was captured and collared by USFWS workers. She was then released as a “Judas wolf” — once she lead the workers back to her pack, they were all exterminated. (Montana, outside of Yellowstone.)

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Four wolf pelts lie draped over the back of a federal official’s truck near Helena, MT. These wolves once formed a pack that was killed to assuage local ranchers’ fears that theymight someday kill cattle.

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Four wolf pelts lie draped over the back of a federal official’s truck near Helena, MT. These wolves once formed a pack that was killed to assuage local ranchers’ fears that theymight someday kill cattle.

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Four wolf pelts lie draped over the back of a federal official’s truck near Helena, MT. These wolves once formed a pack that was killed to assuage local ranchers’ fears that theymight someday kill cattle.

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Pawprint of a gray wolf surrounded by ferns on the floor of the old-growth rainforest of Clayoquot Sound, Vancouver Island (British Columbia, Canada.)

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Four wolf pelts lie draped over the back of a federal official’s truck near Helena, MT. These wolves once formed a pack that was killed to assuage local ranchers’ fears that theymight someday kill cattle.

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A worker uses binoculars to track wild gray wolves in Yellowstone National Park.

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Captive gray wolf pups at a breeding facility in South Dakota.

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Mike Phillips, former director of the Yellowstone wolf reintroduction program uses radio telemetry to track wild gray wolves recently released into the park.

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Volunteers give gray wolf pup its shots in an acclimation pen in Yellowstone National Park.

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Volunteers give gray wolf pup its shots in an acclimation pen in Yellowstone National Park.

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Volunteers give gray wolf pup its shots in an acclimation pen in Yellowstone National Park.

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Wild gray wolf waiting to leave the acclimation pen at Yellowstone National Park as part of the reintroduction program.

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Wild gray wolf leaving the acclimation pen at Yellowstone National Park as part of the reintroduction program.

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Two wild gray wolves wait to be released into the acclimation pen in Yellowstone National Park as part of the reintroduction program.

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For fear she and her pack might harm cattle, Opal was captured and collared by USFWS workers. She was then released as a “Judas wolf” — once she lead the workers back to her pack, they were all exterminated.

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For fear she and her pack might harm cattle, Opal was captured and collared by USFWS workers. She was then released as a “Judas wolf” — once she lead the workers back to her pack, they were all exterminated.

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For fear she and her pack might harm cattle, Opal was captured and collared by USFWS workers. She was then released as a “Judas wolf” — once she lead the workers back to her pack, they were all exterminated.

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For fear she and her pack might harm cattle, Opal was captured and collared by USFWS workers. She was then released as a “Judas wolf” — once she lead the workers back to her pack, they were all exterminated.

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For fear she and her pack might harm cattle, Opal was captured and collared by USFWS workers. She was then released as a “Judas wolf” — once she lead the workers back to her pack, they were all exterminated.

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For fear she and her pack might harm cattle, Opal was captured and collared by USFWS workers. She was then released as a “Judas wolf” — once she lead the workers back to her pack, they were all exterminated.

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Hayley Jolma, is comforted by her mother, Karen Jolma, after they discovered that one of the family’s calves had been killed by wolves in the night. (Western MT)

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Four wolf pelts lie draped over the back of a federal official’s truck near Helena, MT. These wolves once formed a pack that was killed to assuage local ranchers’ fears that they might someday kill cattle.

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A captive gray wolf pup reclines in the grass in South Dakota.

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Wild wolf on the beach in Clayoquot Sound, British Columbia.

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Wild wolf resting on the beach in Clayoquot Sound, British Columbia.

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Wild wolf on the beach in Clayoquot Sound, British Columbia.

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Wild wolf on the beach in Clayoquot Sound, British Columbia.

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Wild wolf on the beach in Clayoquot Sound, British Columbia.

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Wild wolf on the beach in Clayoquot Sound, British Columbia.

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A wild wolf forages for food on the beach of Vargas Island, British Columbia, Canada.

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Gray wolves on Vargas Island have become habituated because of feeding by tourists. The wolves are not only a threat to humans, but are also putting themselves in danger of extermination by approaching humans. Here, naturalist Doug Chadwick tries to chase one away through intimidation.

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Wild wolf on the beach in Clayoquot Sound, British Columbia.

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Wild wolves on the beach in Clayoquot Sound, British Columbia.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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