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Biologists capture a male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) near Wood River, Nebraska. They will put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, the birds’ backs. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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Army soldiers doing training exercises at Fort Hood in Killeen, Texas.

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Army soldiers doing training exercises at Fort Hood in Killeen, Texas.

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Army soldiers doing training exercises at Fort Hood in Killeen, Texas.

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Army soldiers doing training exercises at Fort Hood in Killeen, Texas.

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Army soldiers doing training exercises at Fort Hood in Killeen, Texas.

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Army soldiers doing training exercises at Fort Hood in Killeen, Texas.

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Army soldiers doing training exercises at Fort Hood in Killeen, Texas.

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Endangered (US and IUCN) golden-cheeked warblers (Dendroica chrysoparia) Killeen, Texas.

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A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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A studio portrait of an endangered (IUCN and US) golden-cheeked warbler (Dendroica chrysoparia).

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An endangered (IUCN and US) golden-cheeked warbler (Dendroica chrysoparia) caught in a mist net by scientists from the Nature Conservancy. Scientists net and band golden-cheeked warblers at Fort Hood in Killeen, Texas.

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An endangered (IUCN and US) golden-cheeked warbler (Dendroica chrysoparia) caught in a mist net by scientists from the Nature Conservancy. Scientists net and band golden-cheeked warblers at Fort Hood in Killeen, Texas.

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A vulnerable black-capped vireo (Vireo atricapilla) at a nest in an Ashe juniper, Fort Hood, TX. Though at an active military base, this is a haven for this endangered species.

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Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

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Sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) kettling over the Platte River, near the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary in Gibbon, Nebraska.

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Sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) in flight over the Platte River near the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary in Gibbon, Nebraska.

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Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

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A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

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Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River, forming living sandbars, during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

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Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

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Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

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Sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) in flight over the Platte River near the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary in Gibbon, Nebraska.

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Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

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Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

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Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

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ANI082-00019

Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

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ANI082-00004

Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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